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How many tools does it take?

Discussion in 'Stock 1995 - 2001 Explorers' started by koda2000, March 20, 2017.

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    1. koda2000

      koda2000 Explorer Addict

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      I'm always amazed how many tools it takes to do a relatively simple repair. Today I replaced the upper control arms and lower ball joints on my daughter's 2000 Mountaineer. I've done this same job twice before, so I should know what's required, but when the job is done and I look at all the tools I've used (and now have to pick up and put away) I amazed.

      - air compressor
      - extension cord
      - impact wrench
      - various 1/2" impact sockets
      - various 3/8's metric sockets
      - several 3/8's ratchets and extensions
      - 1/2" ratchet
      - 1/2" torque wrench and extension
      - BFH and smaller hammer
      - 3 screw drivers (none of which were used for screws)
      - various metric wrenches
      - large pry bar
      - chisel
      - magnet (to pick up tools I drop)
      - flashlight (to locate the tools I drop)
      - piece of pipe for extra leverage on ratchets
      - needle nose pliers
      - diagonal cutters
      - snap ring pliers
      - grease gun
      - 2 floor jacks
      - pair of safety stands
      - 2 cement blocks (to rest brake calipers on)
      - cotter pin assortment
      - blue Loctite
      - utility knife (to open boxes and plastic parts bags)
      - awl (to align cotter pin holes)
      - ball joint press (though I only uses a few pieces of it)
      - trim tool (to remove splash shield retainers_
      - mechanics stool
      - large piece of cardboard to sit/lay on
      - WD40
      - garden hose
      - mechanics gloves
      - paper towels
      - piece of re bar (to make sure the hood stays open)

      and I'm sure I'm forgetting a few other tools I used...
       
      Last edited: March 21, 2017
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    3. shucker1

      shucker1 Elite Explorer

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      Koda,

      Not sure if you have seen this but.

      TOOLS EXPLAINED:

      DRILL PRESS:

      A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat metal bar
      stock out of your hands so that it smacks you in the chest and flings
      your beer across the room, denting the freshly-painted project which
      you had carefully
      set in the corner where nothing could get to it.



      WIRE WHEEL:

      Cleans paint off bolts and then throws them somewhere under the
      workbench with the speed of light. Also removes fingerprints and hard-
      earned calluses from fingers in about the time it takes you to
      say, 'Oh sh --'



      SKILL SAW:

      A portable cutting tool used to make studs too short.



      PLIERS:

      Used to round off bolt heads. Sometimes used in the creation of blood-
      blisters.




      BELT SANDER:

      An electric sanding tool commonly used to convert minor touch-up jobs
      into major refinishing jobs.



      HACKSAW:

      One of a family of cutting tools built on the Ouija board
      principle... It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable
      motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course, the more
      dismal your future becomes.




      VISE-GRIPS:

      Generally used after pliers to completely round off bolt heads. If
      nothing else is available, they can also be used to transfer intense
      welding heat to the palm of your hand.




      OXYACETYLENE TORCH:

      Used almost entirely for lighting various flammable objects in your
      shop on fire. Also handy for igniting the grease inside the wheel hub
      out of which you want to remove a bearing race..




      TABLE SAW:

      A large stationary power tool commonly used to launch wood
      projectiles for testing wall integrity.




      HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK:

      Used for lowering an automobile to the ground after you have
      installed your new brake shoes, trapping the jack handle firmly under
      the bumper.



      BAND SAW:

      A large stationary power saw primarily used by most shops to cut good
      aluminum sheet into smaller pieces that more easily fit into the
      trash can after you cut on the inside of the line instead of the
      outside edge.




      TWO-TON ENGINE HOIST:

      A tool for testing the maximum tensile strength of everything you
      forgot to disconnect.




      PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER:

      Normally used to stab the vacuum seals under lids or for opening old-
      style paper-and-tin oil cans and splashing oil on your shirt; but can
      also be used, as the name implies, to strip out Phillips screw heads.




      STRAIGHT SCREWDRIVER:

      A tool for opening paint cans. Sometimes used to convert common
      slotted screws into non-removable screws and butchering your palms.




      PRY BAR:

      A tool used to crumple the metal surrounding that clip or bracket you
      needed to remove in order to replace a 50 cent part.




      HOSE CUTTER:

      A tool used to make hoses too short.




      HAMMER:

      Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer nowadays is used
      as a kind of divining rod to locate the most expensive parts adjacent
      the object we are trying to hit.




      UTILITY KNIFE:

      Used to open and slice through the contents of cardboard cartons
      delivered to your front door; works particularly well on contents
      such as seats, vinyl
      records, liquids in plastic bottles, collector magazines, refund
      checks, and rubber or plastic parts.

      Especially useful for slicing work clothes, but only while in use.




      Son of a b*tch TOOL:

      Any handy tool that you grab and throw across the garage while
      yelling 'Son of a b*tch' at the top of your lungs. It is also, most
      often, the next tool that you will need

       
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    4. koda2000

      koda2000 Explorer Addict

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      LOL... all too true.
       
    5. toypaseo

      toypaseo Flunked daycare Elite Explorer

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      Geez, that tool list makes me think that job is far beyond what I want to attempt...
       
    6. RandomNerd2000

      RandomNerd2000 Active Member

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      I've done this, and that list sounds about right, I have a really long breaker bar I ended up with though I use, it's 3 feet or so, works great, or at least it did on my green truck, don't even want to go there on the white one but it needs a whole front end rebuild seemingly.
       
    7. koda2000

      koda2000 Explorer Addict

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      It's not that bad of a job. Just time consuming. I'd rather change control arms and bj's than ever mess with another 5.0 water pump again.
       
    8. 429CJ-3X2

      429CJ-3X2 Elite Explorer

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      How many tools? At least 1 more than what is within reach at any given time.

      2 or 3 years ago, I bought an extendable 3/8" ratchet. Collapsed, it's maybe a little longer than a regular ratchet. Pull the collar on the handle down, and it extends 3-4". That extra leverage often turns a "no way that's going to turn" into an easy job. I bought it at Northern Tool and Equipment, but I don't know the brand.
       
    9. koda2000

      koda2000 Explorer Addict

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      I've seen those extendable ratchets. Seems like a good design. I have a 2 piece jack handle that I saved from the first small floor jack I ever bought. Each piece is about 12" long and one piece fits inside the other. It's made of heavy steel. The diameter of the larger diameter piece is just right for ratchet handles. I use it all the time with my ratchets. I also have a 36" piece of old BMW motorcycle fork tube for the really tough stuff. My IR 1/2" pneumatic impact wrench works for most big bolts/nuts, but there isn't always room to use it. I have a 3 foot 1/2" breaker bar and a 3/8" pneumatic ratchet that I almost never use.
       
    10. Josh P

      Josh P Shaggin Wagon Elite Explorer

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      Beer would be a job aid and it wasn't on the list.
       
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    11. koda2000

      koda2000 Explorer Addict

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      I figured beer is a given...
       
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    12. Spuddy

      Spuddy Active Member

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      If you can't fix it with wrenches or yer BFH , watcha got there is electramicle problems.

      :chug:
       
    13. CDW6212R

      CDW6212R Hauls the mail. Elite Explorer

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      I'm a sissy, I use gloves for sure(prefer the 7mm thick ones), no air tools just the C3 19v stuff(love the impact wrench), with lots of paper towels and cardboard.

      I just bought a big new toolbox that I need to put my tools into, when I can find them. I've buried most of my extra parts and tools, scattered all around the garage, ... and through the house too.

      I'm a collector of tools, and parts, not so much of a user anymore.
       
    14. koda2000

      koda2000 Explorer Addict

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      Some of my tools were my dad's, but not very many. I recall a Snap-On socket set, a few wrenches and my BFH were my dad's, but the majority of my tools I've acquired over a lifetime. I got enough tools to fill a large 3-tier tool box, another smaller 2-tier toolbox and a 2 draw carry tool box. I have a 5 draw tool box that has most of my dad's old tools in it, but I seldom have any reason to go in there as his thing was more plumbing related and mine has always been motorcycles, cars & trucks. It saddens me that once I'm gone no one in my family well have any use for my tools.
       

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    15. 429CJ-3X2

      429CJ-3X2 Elite Explorer

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      That's true for most of what we've accumulated in our lifetimes. Just before we got married, an older couple we knew at church was moving from their house to an apartment. They gave us this advice, "Start throwing it out now." No matter what it was, start throwing it out now. We most definitely did not take their advice. After dealing with my parents' leftovers after Dad died 4 years ago, I see the wisdom in that advice, but I still keep accumulating stuff.

      Harbor Freight has built 4 new stores that I know of in eastern Iowa since last fall. I delivered the copier to 3 of them while they were still under construction. Spent my lunch break at the new store in Muscatine, Ia today, and I spotted an extendable 1/2" ratchet there for $17.99. It extends to 18".
       
    16. koda2000

      koda2000 Explorer Addict

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      Well, I figure when I'm gone my junk will be someone else's problem... LOL
       
    17. Josh P

      Josh P Shaggin Wagon Elite Explorer

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      Where there is a will, I want to be in it...
       
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    18. CDW6212R

      CDW6212R Hauls the mail. Elite Explorer

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      That's good Josh, funny.

      The longer ratchets, I've relied on an old Craftsman 3/8" long swivel headed thing since the 80's. I bought it knowing it'd be handier than going bigger with breaker bars and 1/2" stuff. I misplaced it last Spring, and giving up(thought I left it at JY), I bought a Gear Wrench set of swivel ratchets. Then Sears put the Craftsman ratchets on sale for over 2/3 off, and I got both the 3/8" and 1/2" size. They were both under $20 each, and the big one is as long as my old 1/2" breaker bar. Those are handy tools.

      Then soon I got under the hood of my Mercury that I hadn't touched for months. I had pulled the power steering pulley to check the new 8-rib piece I had. LOL, I had left my old long 3/8" ratchet on the tensioner bolt. Now I have two of them, one with a bit of corrosion.
       
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    19. Josh P

      Josh P Shaggin Wagon Elite Explorer

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      I've done the same, give up looking for a lost tool and buy and new one. When I'm done using it I say to myself I'll store it next to the old tool so it doesn't get lost and sure enough that is when I find it.
       
    20. toypaseo

      toypaseo Flunked daycare Elite Explorer

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      I have collected a "decent" set of tools. Most from me sale shopping at Sears, some from my Dad, from flea markets, from eBay, and from Harbor Freight. The most used brand for me is made in USA Craftsman though...
       
    21. koda2000

      koda2000 Explorer Addict

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      I have that same Craftsman flex head 3/8's ratchet. I like the longer handle and sometimes the flex head comes in handy, but the fact that it "flexes" so easily sometimes drive me nuts.

      I have this 3/8's plastic knob thing I got at Napa. It's great for increasing the torque you can apply to a socket with your fingers so that you can turn a bolt/nut by hand, instead of struggling with a ratchet when a bolt/nut is too tight to turn with your fingers alone, but too lose to turn with a ratchet. I've misplaced it twice and bought another one only to find the original (once while going to put a new one away in my tool chest). Once I left it on a bolt, started the engine, heard something go flying under the hood smacked by the fan. At the time I didn't know what it was. Years later I was taking an inner fender loose to get at something and guess what fell out?

      I also have a draw of my tool chest dedicated to what I call "special tools". These are regular tools that I've had to modify, one why or an other, to do a particular job. For example; a 4" long 7/8" Snap-On box wrench (I also have a 8" long 3/4" Snap-on box wrench) a screw diver shaped like a spoon handle, a flat blade screw driver with a 90 degree bend on its tip, a long flat blade screw driver with a notch filed in its tip, modified sockets and needle nose pliers and such. Sometimes you just gotta do what you gotta do.
       
    22. CDW6212R

      CDW6212R Hauls the mail. Elite Explorer

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      That's true, and a whole lot cheaper than hunting a Snap-On truck to jump onto to browse for that odd stuff.
       

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