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Transmission Line Leaking

Discussion in 'Stock 1995 - 2001 Explorers' started by Jyosua, June 10, 2011.

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    1. Jyosua

      Jyosua Member

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      The transmission line that goes into the radiator to cool it down is leaking. I took it apart and put a rubber o-ring in and that stopped the leaking for a while, but I fear the heat may be ruining that seal, and causing the leak again. Below is a picture. It's leaking right from that thread that is circled. Any advice/instruction for how to fix this? Is it possible to just replace the line? Can I repair it somehow? Thanks.

      http://jyosua.superbusnet.com/TrannyLeak.jpg
       
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    3. mayhem1605

      mayhem1605 Member

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      I'm not sure about repairing it, someone else may know but you should be able to buy steel tubing from your local parts store and bend it up yourself
       
    4. Jyosua

      Jyosua Member

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      Is it hard to connect at the other end? I'm not even sure where it leads... Additionally, how do you go about bending the tube? Do you have to apply heat?
       
    5. mayhem1605

      mayhem1605 Member

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      it leads to the passenger side of the transmission, i'm not sure how difficult it is to replace, i haven't gone down that road yet. you do not need heat to bend the line, harbor freight sells a kit that has a single flare tool and 4 benders. I'm not sure how well these work, eastwood sells a couple different tools for bending transmission, brake, and fuel lines.
       
    6. Jyosua

      Jyosua Member

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      Well thank you. I'd still like advice on repair the current line if it's possible, so I'm not going to mark this as resolved yet. I imagine I could cut the line and reflare it.
       
    7. drdoom

      drdoom Well-Known Member

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      Replacing the whole line would be a little tough, I would think. If it was me I would try to stop the leak at the fitting (again). Has your radiator been replaced recently? Reason I am asking is, is that not an adapter we see in your photo? I replaced my radiator some years back, and I seem to recall there being some adapters that came with it.
       
    8. Jyosua

      Jyosua Member

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      It might have been. I bought my truck used about 2 years ago, but I don't know the entirety of the work that went into it before my ownership.
       
    9. Jyosua

      Jyosua Member

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      I took a look at the fitting, and noticed the flared end had a flat side to it. I'm guessing that's probably the issue. I cut it off and reflared the fitting, but I had to bend the line to do it. Now I can't get it back on... Anyone know a good way to bend the line again without hurting it?
       
    10. Jyosua

      Jyosua Member

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      I figured out how to reconnect the hose, but the leak is still there. In fact, it's a little bit worse since I took out a temporary o-ring.

      http://jyosua.superbusnet.com/IMG_0231.JPG

      There are some cracks around the end of the part that screws in, the portion that holds the flared end to the inside of the connector, and I'm not sure if that's affecting the leak.

      If anybody knows what might be causing this, advice would be greatly appreciated.
       
    11. my98nnj

      my98nnj Well-Known Member

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      Put the o-ring back and call it fixed!
       
    12. Jyosua

      Jyosua Member

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      I would do that, except the o-ring was pretty chewed up because of the heat, and I don't want to ruin my transmission with o-ring particles. I'm going to buy a o-ring today, and hope that will fix it well enough.
       
    13. budwich

      budwich Well-Known Member

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      The "basic strategy" for trans line "repair".... is cut the line, throw out the "faulty component" (ie. tube, connector or otherwise). In this case, get a replacement line with the appropriate connectors (as short as possible but irrelevant... since it is going to be cut to fit). Cut the replacement line so the you now have a new connector (and flare) and an "appropriate" length of line. Connect it to the rad. Get a short length of rubber hose with the inner diameter EQUAL to the other diameter of the line/tube. "Connect" the new line and existing old line using the rubber hose by sliding the hose over the two lines/tube. Use worm screw clamps to secure the hose around each line/tube. Done. Anyone who has tried to get a very old rad off a vehicle has done this "method" because they usually are not able to get the threaded connections off at the rad and thus they just cut the lines. Make sure you get the right size replacement tube/fitting/threadings.
       
    14. Jyosua

      Jyosua Member

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      I could do that, but that would require me to buy a line with the right fitting. At Autozone, it runs about $76 and requires special ordering... that's not something I'd like to entertain, but will if I absolutely have to.

      That said, thank you for the advice if I end up having to go that route. I can easily get the threaded fittings off at the radiator, but finding replacements seems impossible...
       
    15. budwich

      budwich Well-Known Member

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      I don't think you understand.... you don't replace the entire line or even try to buy one "like it". you buy a straight metal line that is 2 or 3 feet long.... basically $10. They are "generic". They are used for trans, gas, brake, etc. Most auto parts places have them.... and if we got them up here in "back water canada", you guys got them down there. The important thing is to get the right diameter and threaded fitting / flare.... but there are adapters (as someone noted) that you can buy that will typically adapter almost anything on the rad (rad shop or otherwise).

      You basically cut a small length of this line and use it to basically replace the "bad" end.
       
      Last edited: June 13, 2011
    16. Jyosua

      Jyosua Member

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      Oh, I understood that much. The problem is the connectors... I can't seem to find suitable ones anywhere...
       
    17. budwich

      budwich Well-Known Member

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      go to a rad shop...they will have either new ones or a "ton" of "recycled" adapters for any kind of fitting.

      Actually back to someone elses question, I suspect you don't actually have the right fitting on the rad to begin with, hence you are battling up hill. The "receiver" is probably NOT for a flair nut connector... it is intended to have an adapter on it. Just my guess.... but I agree with the other poster's comment... something isn't right based on my experience a couple of years ago... a real bad one with tranny fluid and coolant mixing... :-(

      I had to re-read what you wrote.... not sure I understand "you re-flared" the fitting... ????? or did you mean the tube/line? I don't think you can "re-flare" a fitting "successfully".... I guess you found that out... :-(
       
      Last edited: June 13, 2011
    18. Jyosua

      Jyosua Member

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      I'm actually considering tossing the connector that is used to connect the double flaired tube end to the radiator, in lieu of a brass adaptor to allow the use of a rubber hose. Has anyone tried using a rubber hose to connect to the radiator? Is this a good or a bad idea? I just need something to last me a few months, until I can get the money and time (and back to my house in Florida!) to fix it properly.

      I'm currently in California for an internship. I actually live in Florida, so all my tools and essentially everything is back there. I'm currently working with a friend's tools, and limited time.

      Also: Yes, I meant the tube, not the fitting. My bad. I don't always re-read what I write. :p
       
      Last edited: June 13, 2011
    19. BubbaFL

      BubbaFL Active Member

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      I've got a similar leak from the bottom line - I tightened up the connectors; if that doesn't stop the leak I'm just going to get an aftermarket trans cooler, cut the hard lines and run rubber hoses.

      The transmission will probably be happy to not have its fluid bathed in hot coolant during 100+ degree summers here.
       
    20. Jyosua

      Jyosua Member

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      I was thinking about doing that as well, but isn't that a harder job? Also, would doing that require me to bypass my stock cooler?

      The bottom line isn't leaking, so I was wondering if a kit would provide me with everything I need to cut the top line, run rubber from it to the aftermarket cooler, and then run rubber from the aftermarket to the stock cooler.
       
    21. BubbaFL

      BubbaFL Active Member

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      I don't think you could run rubber from the aftermarket cooler to the stock one.

      My plan is to just cut the lines, plumb in an aftermarket cooler, and forget about the stock one.
       
    22. Jyosua

      Jyosua Member

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    23. budwich

      budwich Well-Known Member

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      As you "think", just get the appropriate brass to hose fitting that goes directly into the rad... choose wisely for the hose size that fits over the existing flare line.... just push the flare nut back at bit, slip on the hose, clamp and your done. It won't be a problem as it isn't a high pressure flow.
       
    24. Jyosua

      Jyosua Member

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      About $17 and 45 minutes later, my leak is fixed, and wonderfully so! BubbaFL, you should definitely give this a go.
       
    25. Jyosua

      Jyosua Member

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      Well it turns out this was only part of the problem... It's also leaking from between the radiator and that large brass nut. At this point, I'm probably going to caulk it, and call it a day.
       
    26. budwich

      budwich Well-Known Member

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      be very careful here.... cause if you have a leak that allows "intermixing"... your transmission isn't going to like it... :-( hopefully that leak is external and NOT a symptom that the entire connection is "weak".
       

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