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Front wheel bearings

Discussion in 'Stock 1991 - 1994 Explorers' started by Chrisman889, August 25, 2013.

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  1. Chrisman889

    Chrisman889 Active Member

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    Was looking to see what tools I need to change my front wheel bearings on my 93 stock explorer 4X4. I bought a set of 4 Timken set 37 to install.
     
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  3. TorontoGuy

    TorontoGuy Member

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    This is an excellent write-up that was done on replacing the front brakes, but also includes the front wheels bearings. Trust me when I say it only looks intimidating. It's all really straight forward, just take your time.

    http://www.explorerforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=122696

    The only additional tools you need other than a proper socket set are a 2 3/8" hub socket like this:

    [​IMG]

    and a strong magnet. I was prepared with a set of picks (like the ones the dentist uses) in case the magnet wasn't strong enough to pull out the key as outlined in the link I posted.

    Hope this help! :)
     
  4. Chrisman889

    Chrisman889 Active Member

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    The problem is I have put on the Warn manual locking hubs and the spindle nut is different but 2 3/8 sounds like the right size.
     
  5. Chrisman889

    Chrisman889 Active Member

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    Wait a second, is there only one bearing per hub? I thought there were two.
     
  6. TorontoGuy

    TorontoGuy Member

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    If you've got the Warn manual hubs you won't need the 2 3/8" socket but instead you'll need a 4 pronged 4WD hub socket that looks like this:

    [​IMG]

    I'm not exactly sure if there's different sizes though so you'll have to look into that.

    As for the bearings there are 2 per hub. One inner (that goes into the back of the rotor and will require a new seal) and one that goes into the front of the rotor that sits up against the hub nut.

    This is where the outer bearing goes:
    [​IMG]

    This is where the inner bearing goes:
    [​IMG]

    This is the seal that will need to be replaced onto the back of the rotor. You can see that the inner bearing has been installed in this picture:
    [​IMG]

    Cheers.
     
  7. Chrisman889

    Chrisman889 Active Member

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    Thank you very much this is awesome info. One last thing, the torque specs, I believe you torque down to 125 lbs and then back it off, then torque down to 25lb. Is this correct?
     
  8. TorontoGuy

    TorontoGuy Member

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    Last edited: August 26, 2013
  9. Maniak

    Maniak Moderator-Stock 91-94 Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    If I'm understanding the thread correctly, you have the warn manual hubs now..

    In that case the inner nut gets put on and while turning the rotor, crank it down to 25 ft pounds or so.. Now back it off and it goes back on loose. I can't remember the exact "inch pound" torque spec but I always just put it greasy finger tight.

    Now put on the washer thing and the outer nut and crank down on that outer nut. 125 Foot pounds or more.

    ~Mark
     
  10. Tony H

    Tony H Well-Known Member

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    Just tight enough so the tires do not have an up and down or side to side movement.
    Then the washer with the holes will lock that nut from turning. The outer nut you can hammer home pretty good since that acts as a pinch nut.

    Take note that the two nuts are NOT the same. The Inner nut has a Pin pressed in it that.
    Hopefully you can enlage this Hub Install to see the Pin on teh Nut. ( Right side of picture
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: August 26, 2013
  11. Carguy3J

    Carguy3J Well-Known Member

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    Just a word of warning, be VERY careful when you try to torque down the outer nut, with the 4 pronged socket. Once you get up to trying to put all that force (125 Ft-Lbs minimum) on it, the socket will try to "cam-out" of the slots, and you will proceed to slam your hand/fingers into the wheels studs/rotor/etc with a LOT of force. I did it once, in the middle of winter (single digits), and I was sure I broke my hand, until it thawed out a bit. It throbbed for nearly a a week, along with a nice cut.

    Be sure you are using your other hand to push that socket straight in, as hard as you can, and be very aware of when it starts to slip. At that point, you can switch to using a punch or an old hefty screw driver, in the slots on the lock nut, and tap a little tighter with a hammer. That's usually how I, and many mechanics, break it loose when its time to take them back off. Just be careful not to chip a a corner off, and leave it in the bearings.

    Look here, in the "Locking Hub" section- right side of the page:
    http://www.therangerstation.com/tech_library/index-axles.shtml

    The first too articles, for manual hub swaps, will be helpful.

    Also, as much of a pain as it can be, be sure you change out the bearing races, in the rotor too. (unless you're also installing new rotors, which should have new races already installed)They come in the "Set37" anyway, and you need to use them. New bearings in old races=problem.
     
  12. IAmTodd

    IAmTodd 4x Explorer Veteran

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    Best investment ever:

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Carguy3J

    Carguy3J Well-Known Member

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    I've seen those before, but nobody had those in stock at the time I got mine. In any case, I don't see how that would really help. The issue isn't really a case of the tool "slipping" per-se.

    Rather, your applying a huge amount of force, via a lever that is off-set to one side of the axis of rotation, upon which you are trying to apply that force. ( the long handle of the torque wrench is not in "in-line" with the nut- specifically the 4 teeth where the force is applied) That is inducing a side load that wants to push the socket in directions other then just a linear rotational direction. Adding in the fact that your arm, which is applying the force, is likely to also be offset from the rotational axis, it only gets worse. That's why using you other hand/foot to simultaneously apply inward force on the socket helps to keep it in place. Of course that might also alter the torque wrench readings, but I doubt that really matters in this application.

    I think the only thing that would eliminate that ""side" force and possible camming action would be a spanner wrench, with a straight handle, directly on the nut (no socket/ratchet to offset the force applied), with you arm pulling/pushing in a perfectly straight line. It would be probably have to be on a lift, with you (or your arm at least) being directly under/in-line with the nut/wrench.

    Or just use the hammer and punch.......
     
  14. Tony H

    Tony H Well-Known Member

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    Yes support that socket, it does want to walk out.

    I have never found that shielded style. I was going to weld a sleeve over mine. never did
     
  15. Chrisman889

    Chrisman889 Active Member

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    Where can I order one of those? Brand? There's actually a real good video on YouTube with the job being done on a ranger with a similar socket.
     
  16. IAmTodd

    IAmTodd 4x Explorer Veteran

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    Found it at a swap meet with no package. It does work much better than the open one, I have both. I've found that you still need to keep pressure on it to keep it seated but it doesn't want to walk around as much. The open style was chewing up the slots on the nuts, the closed one does not.
     
  17. Maniak

    Maniak Moderator-Stock 91-94 Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    Here it is on Amazon.com for < $20

    http://www.amazon.com/AMPRO-T72044-Bearing-Locknut-Socket/dp/B00A4AIRDS

    That looks to be a different brand than what I own ( I can't remember what brand I have, but its not black). I ran across mine in a auto parts store.. Of course, I don't use it anymore... but I have it.

    ~Mark
     
  18. Tony H

    Tony H Well-Known Member

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    To help in locating one, they are the same as is on the 1/2 ton Chevy vehicles.
    E-bay "1/2 ton spindle nut .. plenty to choose from http://www.ebay.com/itm/KD-Tools-4-...ltDomain_0&hash=item4cfe950d0f#ht_2045wt_1027


    Here's another great tool for a slide hammer for when it comes time to do Upper and lower ball joints. Pops teh spindle off in a second. http://www.lislecorp.com/divisions/products/?product=95
     
  19. 4x4junkie

    4x4junkie Well-Known Member

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    Change the races no matter what (your SET-37s come with them, use them).
    Mismatched bearings & races are probably a significant reason why a lot of people have bearing failures happen on these frontends (stupidest thing ever to include the races in new rotors without the bearings that are supposed to go with them :rolleyes: Who knows what their country of origin is).

    Changing races only takes me a few minutes per rotor using a hammer & punch. Not a pain at all.
     
  20. IAmTodd

    IAmTodd 4x Explorer Veteran

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    Possibly what happened with my first set. Used the installed races and blew through the bearings. When I removed them (much easier than I though, used the old race to drive the new one in) I found them to be made in China. Matched Timken bearings and races installed now. :thumbsup:
     
  21. Punjab

    Punjab Member

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    How do I get the inner bearing seal out of the rotor?
     

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