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Leaking Kitchenaid Dishwasher Repair

Discussion in 'Home Improvement' started by 2000StreetRod, January 4, 2019.

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    1. 2000StreetRod

      2000StreetRod Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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      For decades my wife and I always started the dishwasher just before going to bed at night. But on the evening of July 9, 2014 the float valve on our General Electric dishwasher stuck open. The next morning my wife found the kitchen flooded and eventually all our downstairs hardwood floors had to be replaced: Running dishwasher at bedtime Since then we have started our dishwasher at 7:30 pm so the wash cycle will be complete before we go to bed.

      On Dec. 26, 2018 I noticed a puddle forming on the floor in front of our 4.5 year old Kitchenaid dishwasher. I removed the cover below the door and found water dripping from the central area of the dishwasher bottom. Thru internet research I learned that our model (KDEF104DWH0) utilized narrow, crimp style hose clamps that were prone to failure. Since I have a large collection of hose clamps that includes narrow German made screw type hose clamps used on motorcycles I decided to remove the dishwasher and inspect.

      Below is an illustration of the pump motor assembly (#1) and related parts.
      PumpDiagram.jpg
      #20 is the narrow crimp hose clamp. There is one on each end of the flexible elbow (#9). #11 is an expandable flexible coupling.

      The photo below shows the pump motor assembly with the damper (#21) installed.
      Bottom1.jpg
      The photo below shows the pump assembly after the damper (that reduces noise) has been removed.
      Bottom2.jpg
      Inspection revealed that both crimp hose clamps were intact and tight.
      Hoses.jpg
      There is no solid support for the pump assembly - probably to reduce noise and vibration. The pump assembly is only kept in place by the flexible elbow and the flexible coupling. The motor can move about 0.5 inches laterally at the coupling. With age the coupling would leak and I assumed this was the source of my current leak. I decided to attempt to stop the leak without replacing any parts. I applied a coating of 100% silicone clear outdoor sealant to the exposed portion of the coupling. The specified curing time of the sealant is 24 hours but I used a hair dryer to shorten the time. During a period of two hours I applied a total of 3 coats of sealant and let it cure for about 30 hours.
      Hoses2.jpg
      I found information on a Whirlpool dishwasher that incorporates a similar motor assembly configuration but utilizes a support bracket. So I installed insulated wire to limit the movement of the motor assembly as shown below.
      Bottom3.jpg
      I placed a cookie sheet on the floor below the pump assembly to act as a drip pan. So far the dishwasher has completed 5 wash cycles with no leaks. Online I found a replacement flexible elbow for $49.59 (includes 2 hose clamps that are $8.49 each) and the flexible coupling for $21.06. I haven't yet ordered any parts.
       
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    3. BrooklynBay

      BrooklynBay Moderator & long time member. Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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      Before you removed the dishwasher, did you see water marks on the areas where you applied silicone? The large seal around the entire assembly where it meets the plastic housing could leak with age so that's another area to check. Those crimp band clamps are similar to the type which are used on CV joint boots.
       
    4. 2000StreetRod

      2000StreetRod Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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      When the dishwasher was leaking I could tell that it was not leaking from the large diameter main seal. After removing the dishwasher I could not find any water marks but it had only just started to leak. Because of that, I had no confidence that the silicone was being applied to the correct component. I made sure the three fasteners on the main seal were tight.
       

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