Dismiss Notice



Register Today It's free! This box will disappear once registered!

Overhead Valve vs. Overhead Cam Radiator

Discussion in 'Under the Hood' started by KwaiChangKate, August 5, 2010.

^^Searches ExplorerForum.com^^





  1. KwaiChangKate

    KwaiChangKate New Member

    Joined:
    August 3, 2010
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    City, State:
    Honolulu, HI
    Year, Model & Trim Level:
    2000 XLS
    Aloha! I am the happy owner of a 2000 Ford Explorer with a 4.0L overhead cam V6. (I'm not sure if it's single or dual overhead cams.)

    My Story:

    I recently popped the seam in the upper tank of my radiator — and went out to purchase a new radiator from a local shop and have my mechanic install it. All was well, until he went to hook up the transmission cooling lines. They simply did not fit.

    After queering the radiator shop, they said, "Oh! You must have the overhead cam engine. That's a different radiator."

    And with that, the shop refused to accept the mistaken part for return. After all, it had, "Already been installed." And they could care less that they specified and sold the wrong part in the first place.

    So, my questions:

    1. Is there a way to adapt the cooling lines to fit this radiator?

    2. Do I want to? After all, if this is a radiator for the overhead valve engine, does it have less cooling capacity than the radiator for the overhead cam engine?

    3. Should I just purchase a transmission cooler and call it a day?

    Note: This is an explorer XLS with airconditioning and all the other basic power options.

    Mahalo for your time and consideration,


    Katie
     
  2. Support EF

    Special! - 2 Year Elite membership now through July 24 $20!

    Explorer Forum has probably saved you that much already, and will continue to save you money as you learn how to diagnose fix problems yourself and learn which modifications work without having to experiment on your own. Elite Explorer members see practically no ads, can add their own profile photo, upload photo attachments in all forums, and Media Gallery, create more private Conversations, and more. Join Today. Your support is greatly appreciated.



  3. IZwack

    IZwack Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    February 5, 2003
    Messages:
    21,786
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    68
    City, State:
    Germantown, MD
    Year, Model & Trim Level:
    1998 Ford Explorer
    What do you mean by they did not fit? Are the lines not long enough or are the threaded fittings different?
     
  4. KwaiChangKate

    KwaiChangKate New Member

    Joined:
    August 3, 2010
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    City, State:
    Honolulu, HI
    Year, Model & Trim Level:
    2000 XLS
    Different fittings. They simply would not thread, as if the radiator were metric and the lines standard. Personally, I suspect a difference in line diameter size. Erm, more cooling capacity for DOHC drive trains?
     
  5. IZwack

    IZwack Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    February 5, 2003
    Messages:
    21,786
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    68
    City, State:
    Germantown, MD
    Year, Model & Trim Level:
    1998 Ford Explorer
    Perhaps you can find some radiator lines from an OHV vehicle and spice the ends into the existing lines with rubber hose from the auto parts store (as I recall, its 3/8" diameter). The transmission lines are low pressure so rubber hose is suitable. Dont forget to use some hose clamps to prevent the hose from pulling out.
     
  6. KwaiChangKate

    KwaiChangKate New Member

    Joined:
    August 3, 2010
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    City, State:
    Honolulu, HI
    Year, Model & Trim Level:
    2000 XLS
    Thanks IZ. I'll run this one as plan C. I'd prefer to simply come up with an adaptive fitting … or get the radiator I should have gotten to begin with. *Sigh*
     
  7. rhauf

    rhauf Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    November 1, 2005
    Messages:
    1,244
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    48
    City, State:
    Ca
    Year, Model & Trim Level:
    '93 and '91 explorer
    many radiators have pipe thread fittings on the built-in cooler, transmission line fittings are always compression fittings, it's very likely you just need to go to the hardware store and get an adapter (get a brass one) sometimes the radiators come with them.

    the cooling capacity of the radiators should be about the same, usually the only time there is a selection of radiator cooling capacity for a given application, it's for if the car has A/C, or something.


    btw: if you try to plumb up rubber hose fittings, be sure to use transmission cooler line, as fuel line won't last. trans coolers peak at about 30psi so clamp 'em good so they dont pop off.
     
  8. Anime

    Anime EF YEAH!! Elite Explorer

    Joined:
    November 6, 2000
    Messages:
    5,445
    Media:
    9
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    23
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Year, Model & Trim Level:
    2018 EX Sport Concept
    If the shop ordered the radiator for you after diagnosing the problem, and after looking at the vehicle, THEN they tried to install a OHV radiator in a 2000 Explorer (that never even came with the OHV of older Explorers), it's their fault for ordering the wrong part.

    They should immediately order the correct part specific to your vehicle, at no additional cost. Anything less is risking their customer's safety and compromising their vehicle.

    While it's probably possible to adapt things and make it work, I would never suggest doing so, especially for someone who does not work on their own vehicle, and depends on a shop to keep their vehicle in top running shape.

    You don't have to pay for the part if they ordered the wrong thing. If you ordered it on your own, or bought the part elsewhere then brought it to them to install, then it's your problem, but if they sourced the part and made a mistake, it's on them.

    I would refuse to have them install anything but the exact replacement part for the vehicle. If they give you any trouble, advise them of your consumer rights and that you will be in touch with the Better Business Bureau, the State's Attorney General, and the departments that issue their business license. Credit card companies also protect you in these circumstances and will reverse the charges and require that the business take action to your satisfaction if you call them and complain about it, if you used a credit card to pay for the transaction when you agreed to them ordering the part and doing the work.

    If necessary, take your business elsewhere.
     
  9. rabbit91

    rabbit91 Active Member

    Joined:
    January 25, 2011
    Messages:
    654
    Likes Received:
    15
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City, State:
    Surrey
    Year, Model & Trim Level:
    2000 V8 lifted 33s
    Bump what was the outcome? Sounds like the SOHC and OHV mount the same but just have different tranny cooler line fittings ?

    I’ve been thinking about going to a dual core rad and just plumbing my tranny to the aux tranny cooler
     

Share This Page







We Support Our Troops!