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Quick & Dirty front brake job

Discussion in 'Stock 1995 - 2001 Explorers' started by koda2000, October 20, 2014.

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  1. koda2000

    koda2000 Explorer Addict

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    post content deleted
     
    Last edited: October 21, 2014
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  3. swshawaii

    swshawaii Elite Explorer

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    Aka- "Pad Slap" ;)

    Always a good idea to check the bottom slide pins, especially a used vehicle that had pads replaced before.
    Too often they are lubed with regular grease or anti seize that will cause sticking, and swell the rubber boots.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: October 20, 2014
  4. koda2000

    koda2000 Explorer Addict

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    FYI, I did check them by sliding them in and out. They felt smooth and well lubricated. I usually remove them. check them visually, clean and lube them with hi-temp synthetic grease, but this was a "quick & dirty brake job" so you don't get soup and salad with it. There are other things I could have done, like repack the front wheel bearings, doing a real fluid flush, resurfacing (or replacing) the rotors and installing better, more expensive brake pads. This truck is a spare vehicle and as such doesn't get any repairs that aren't necessary right now. if/when it enters the regular rotation it will get better care.
     
  5. RomeovilleIL

    RomeovilleIL Well-Known Member

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  6. koda2000

    koda2000 Explorer Addict

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    yes, I know. I worked at AutoZone for 5 years. I could have done a lot of things, but you're missing my point, "quick & dirty".
     
  7. BustedKnuckles24

    BustedKnuckles24 Member

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    Well, my personal opinion is 'quick and dirty' is simply saving 30 mins and leaving a lot of simple steps out that may come back to bite you.

    Skipping the slide inspection, cleaning and regreasing is a big no-no. Especially since it could be years before you need to replace the pads again. If that grease is near it's limit of repelling water now, 25,000 miles down the road and you could have rust-frozen slides.

    And, just for the record, I always crack open the bleeder when compressing the piston to prevent back-flushing the ABS module with dirty fluid.
     
  8. koda2000

    koda2000 Explorer Addict

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    ahhhh, i give up. i'm deleting my post. there were some good tips there, but you insist on pointing out things i should have done differently. believe me i know the "correct" way to do a brake job.
     
  9. RomeovilleIL

    RomeovilleIL Well-Known Member

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    Don't give up! Fight the good fight for quick and dirty fixes -- they are essential to keeping older vehicles on the road. Yes there are some nice ones still floating around, but the second gens are 14 to 20 years old. Lots of things we fixed "the right way" when the truck was worth $20,000+ don't make a lot of sense when it's aged to the point of being worth $1,500. At this point I wouldn't be too quick to look down at low cost or used parts to keep the trucks on the road a few more years, and certainly quick fixes that work are much better than hauling them off for scrap.

    ** BTW -- I've still got 2, but they aren't driven much anymore. Playing with newer 3/4 ton diesel 4x4's :)
     
  10. 2000StreetRod

    2000StreetRod Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    disappointed

    I am disappointed that you deleted your instructions which I had bookmarked for my future brake upgrade. I found it useful.

    Creative people take a chance of being criticized when posting something helpful to others. Some members who won't take the time to post something original are quick to comment. This is good when done tactfully to correct an error or to improve the original content. Creative people need to be "thick skinned" or they will not gain the satisfaction that comes with helping others.
     
  11. jremington59

    jremington59 Well-Known Member

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    I've done my fair share of quick and dirty and it was just fine. I just take a big C clamp and depress the pistons before removing the caliper. I've found out that a factory rotor with 150,000 miles and a couple scratches and some rust is still a whole lot better then a "new" 30 dollar warp in a year replacement". I've even gone as far as to pull back one side of the slide pin boot and force brake grease into it if it was still sliding smoothly.

    I know Koda well enough to know he'd change something if it were a safety issue but for a spare vehicle that you may or may not drive I'd do the same thing.
     
  12. jremington59

    jremington59 Well-Known Member

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    Do you really think the fluid in the line is any different then the fluid in the ABS system?
     
  13. crunchie_frog

    crunchie_frog Active Member

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    My experience has been (from observations rebuilding calipers) that the dirtiest fluid is in the caliper housing behind the pistons that push the pad. Water will migrate to the low point and corrosion products will develop and collect there as well. I agree with not pushing the dirty fluid back into the abs system as a best practice but to each his own.
     
  14. crunchie_frog

    crunchie_frog Active Member

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    My experience has been (from observations rebuilding calipers) that the dirtiest fluid is in the caliper housing behind the pistons that push the pad. Water will migrate to the low point and corrosion products will develop and collect there as well. I agree with not pushing the dirty fluid back into the abs system as a best practice but to each his own.
     
  15. swshawaii

    swshawaii Elite Explorer

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    Ditto. Granted, I had a folded dust boot, contaminants find a way of getting in. This remained in the bores AFTER flushing TWICE.

    http://www.explorerforum.com/forums/showpost.php?p=3336494&postcount=4
     
  16. koda2000

    koda2000 Explorer Addict

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    Okay, just for you 2000StreetRod, below are the non-controversial tips.

    1. Start by sucking as much old brake fluid as you can get out of the master cylinder. I use an ear syringe with a piece of tubing on the end. Not quite a flush, but better than leaving old water-contaminated fluid in the system.

    2. After loosening the lug nuts, barely jack the tires off the ground. This makes putting the wheels back on very easy, as you don't have to lift the heavy wheel/tire up to get it back on the studs. It's also easier to align the studs with the wheel holes if you put one stud in the 12 o'clock position before reinstalling the wheel.

    3. Remove only the top caliper bolt and just swing the caliper out of your way to be able to remove the old pads and install the new pads easily. If deemed necessary, replace the brake hardware at this time.

    4. Don't put sticky goop on the shims until after the pads are installed in the brake bracket. It makes for a much less messy job.

    5. After pushing back the caliper piston (opening the bleeders to expel contaminated fluid, rather than pushing it back up through the ABS system) swing the caliper back over the pads, and replace the top bolt with Loctite blue on the threads. Torque to 35 Ft lbs. Then remove the bottom bolt, apply Loctite and torque it down. Note: It's a good idea to inspect, clean an lubricate the caliper slides with hi-temp synthetic grease.

    6. Refill the master cylinder with fresh brake fluid. Start the engine and gently pump the brake pedal until the caliper pistons contact the pads. Note: Don't push the brake pedal to the floor when doing this, as it can damage the master cylinder's internal seals. Go for a test drive. Be gentle on the new pads for the first 100 miles or so, until they bed in.

    Note: There are many other things you can include to do a brake job to "best practices" level. I could have included all these things, but then I'd have to rename this thread "How to do a complete and proper brake job" instead of "Quick and Dirty Brake Job". If you want to know how to do a complete and proper brake job... read the service manual and never compromise safety.
     
  17. 2000StreetRod

    2000StreetRod Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    thanks!

    I really appreciate you reposting the steps. I've never replaced any brake components on an Explorer. The last time I replaced any pads was about 15 years ago on a 1997 Tahoe.
     
  18. Carguy3J

    Carguy3J Well-Known Member

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    Its always "deemed" necessary. Its like changing your oil without changing the filter. Many quality pads sets even come with new hardware in the box anyway, and for those that don't, they, literally, cost a couple of dollars.

    a.) It should be clarified, the "sticky goop" that goes on the back side of the pad shims is NOT lube. It should be (typically orange) "disc brake quiet", which is kind of like a rubberized glue/vibration damper material in a squeeze bottle. b.) the hardware/pad guides should be lubed, with synthetic brake grease, before putting the pads on. They move very little in operation. Lubing around them, after install will do little to lube the pad ears.

    Actually, being gentle on the pads is the wrong way to break them in, and it certainly doesn't take anywhere near 100 miles. Of course, if your slapping new pads on an "old" rotor surface (not new or at least freshly "turned"), then you've already lost the battle and they will never be right.
    Here is the proper way to break in/bed new pads:
    (copied from http://www.powerstop.com/brake-pad-break-in-procedure/ )

    The break in procedure is critical to brake performance. The reason for a proper break in is to establish an even layer of friction material deposited on the rotors from the brake pads. It is very important that this initial layer of friction material is evenly distributed.

    Break in the pads as follows :

    5 moderate to aggressive stops from 40 mph down to 10 mph in rapid succession without letting the brakes cool and do not come to a complete stop. If you're forced to stop, either shift into neutral or give room in front so you can allow the vehicle to roll slightly while waiting for the light. The rotors will be very hot and holding down the brake pedal will allow the pad to create an imprint on the rotor. This is where the judder can originate from.
    Then do 5 mod#erate stops from 35 mph to 5 mph in rapid succession without letting the brakes cool. You should expect to smell some resin as the brakes get hot.
    After this is complete, drive around for as long as possible without excessively heating the brakes and without coming to a complete stop (Try for about 5 minutes at moderate speed). This is the cooling stage. It allows the heated resin in the brake pads to cool and cure.
    After the brakes have cooled to standard operating temperature, you may use the brakes normally.

    There should not be any instructions available on how to do a half-assed job, especially on brakes. People on the internet are often too stupid for their own good. They will not have the common sense to know when its ok to get away with less then a full job. (Very rarely, and generally only as a temporary emergency band-aid- not because you feel like saving a few bucks or minutes.) So, they should only be given full and proper instructions, so they learn to do the job right.
     
  19. RomeovilleIL

    RomeovilleIL Well-Known Member

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    Slapping on a new set of pads and driving is a whole lot safer than having worn down pads with no friction material. Sure if components are worn or broken then a complete teardown and rebuild is in order, but most of the time what Koda posted is right on the money for safely keeping the truck on the road.
     
  20. koda2000

    koda2000 Explorer Addict

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    Thank you! That's all I was going for. I did the rears today, only diff was I lubed the slide pins because they were dry. Another $19.99.
     
  21. bill06447

    bill06447 Active Member

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    +1

    Thank you for the informative thread. (even though it's now gone, I got it). I've done my share of quick and dirty's and I'm still here, safe and sound.

    Bill
     

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