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1994 Transfer Case Problem/idenfcation

Fordsgalore4

Elite Explorer
Joined
January 28, 2013
Messages
208
Reaction score
1
City, State
La Habra California
Year, Model & Trim Level
94 EX, 86 Ranger
my 1994 Explorer has 150,000 miles on it and when I was changing my u joints I noticed there was a lot of end play on my transfer case output shaft so I think I need a new rear bearing and seal or should I just rebuild it and I need to no what type of T case I got what numbers on the tag tell me ill list them top to bottom its a Borg Warner IF some one could help me that would be awesome autozone guys have no idea and I also have no clue I got a 5,000 mile road trip in July and need to see if it is safe the way it is or fix it


K2533 1354-13

729877 F27A-J
 



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The transfer case is a Borg Warner 13-54. The T-cases on these models are very strong and last for a long time. Bearing problems at 150k miles would be unlikely, unless there was a defect or the unit had problems internally, or fluid maintenance was not done.

Both t-case output yokes are splined if I recall correctly. Check that the retaining nut is tight on each. This will require a 30mm thin-wall socket. I bought a 30mm impact socket and had a machine shop lathe it down to fit.

The T-case is real easy to tear apart if you want to check out the inside.

It is pretty easy to remove the transfer case. I have done it several times by myself and it is about a 30 minute job once you get good at it. Drain the fluid by removing the vibration damper and then drain plug. Remove the skid plate, four bolts. Undo the driveshafts at the t-case yokes. You can just let them dangle. Remove the electrical connectors if you have an electronic shift t-case, and the t-case speed sensor. Remove the vehicle speed sensor. Disconnect the breather tube, which is just rubber tubing. Five bolts hold the t-case to the transmission. Three are accessible from underneath easily. The top two can be removed from underneath (very hard) but it is far easier to pull back the carpet, remove the transmission access panel in the floor, and remove the bolts through there. Not necessary to remove seats or console to get at the panel. Pull the transfer case backwards off the locating dowels and trans output shaft (splined) and lower it down. I believe the weight is about 72lbs so you can remove it by hand yourself if you have a little bit of muscle. I am a skinny 25 year old and can lift the t-case in and out by myself. Using a jack is just awkward and you risk dropping the case. If the factory gasket is present between t-case and transmission, try to preserve it, but RTV will work if the stock gasket is destroyed. I could not easily find a replacement gasket.

Once you remove the t-case, fluid will dribble out the back of the transmission if you have an automatic. There is a small hole that it dribbles out of in the extension housing. I jammed a coarse thread self tapping screw into the hole to plug it temporarily. The aluminum is soft enough to accept the screw and you won't hurt anything. Just remember to remove it before re-assembly.

Once the case is out you can split it; remove the yokes (30mm thinwall socket) and shift motor (e-shift) with t-case speed sensor if you haven't already done so. 9 bolts hold the front and rear halves together. Use a prybar (Ford says so!) on the bosses provided to split the case. Inside is the guts of your case and it's really not too hard to tear apart and re-assemble. Before re-assembly, clean the case halves and apply new RTV to the mating surfaces.

Common failure and wear items are the low range shift fork wear pads. These plastic pads wear out over time and can allow the low range gear to walk balk and forth and try to engage at cruising speeds. The pads themselves, when completely worn out, often disintegrate and plug the t-case oil pump's screen. Stock wear pads are white opaque plastic so they're easy to find. Replacement pads are available with some searching. They were used on several t-cases and some transmissions.

While you're in there, replacing output yoke bearings and seals are relatively easy. The seals are not too hard to find and I know RockAuto sells a complete new bearing kit.

If you start on this process and want more info on it, or scans from the Ford Service Manual which will make it easier, let me know.
 






The transfer case is a Borg Warner 13-54. The T-cases on these models are very strong and last for a long time. Bearing problems at 150k miles would be unlikely, unless there was a defect or the unit had problems internally, or fluid maintenance was not done.

Both t-case output yokes are splined if I recall correctly. Check that the retaining nut is tight on each. This will require a 30mm thin-wall socket. I bought a 30mm impact socket and had a machine shop lathe it down to fit.

The T-case is real easy to tear apart if you want to check out the inside.

It is pretty easy to remove the transfer case. I have done it several times by myself and it is about a 30 minute job once you get good at it. Drain the fluid by removing the vibration damper and then drain plug. Remove the skid plate, four bolts. Undo the driveshafts at the t-case yokes. You can just let them dangle. Remove the electrical connectors if you have an electronic shift t-case, and the t-case speed sensor. Remove the vehicle speed sensor. Disconnect the breather tube, which is just rubber tubing. Five bolts hold the t-case to the transmission. Three are accessible from underneath easily. The top two can be removed from underneath (very hard) but it is far easier to pull back the carpet, remove the transmission access panel in the floor, and remove the bolts through there. Not necessary to remove seats or console to get at the panel. Pull the transfer case backwards off the locating dowels and trans output shaft (splined) and lower it down. I believe the weight is about 72lbs so you can remove it by hand yourself if you have a little bit of muscle. I am a skinny 25 year old and can lift the t-case in and out by myself. Using a jack is just awkward and you risk dropping the case. If the factory gasket is present between t-case and transmission, try to preserve it, but RTV will work if the stock gasket is destroyed. I could not easily find a replacement gasket.

Once you remove the t-case, fluid will dribble out the back of the transmission if you have an automatic. There is a small hole that it dribbles out of in the extension housing. I jammed a coarse thread self tapping screw into the hole to plug it temporarily. The aluminum is soft enough to accept the screw and you won't hurt anything. Just remember to remove it before re-assembly.

Once the case is out you can split it; remove the yokes (30mm thinwall socket) and shift motor (e-shift) with t-case speed sensor if you haven't already done so. 9 bolts hold the front and rear halves together. Use a prybar (Ford says so!) on the bosses provided to split the case. Inside is the guts of your case and it's really not too hard to tear apart and re-assemble. Before re-assembly, clean the case halves and apply new RTV to the mating surfaces.

Common failure and wear items are the low range shift fork wear pads. These plastic pads wear out over time and can allow the low range gear to walk balk and forth and try to engage at cruising speeds. The pads themselves, when completely worn out, often disintegrate and plug the t-case oil pump's screen. Stock wear pads are white opaque plastic so they're easy to find. Replacement pads are available with some searching. They were used on several t-cases and some transmissions.

While you're in there, replacing output yoke bearings and seals are relatively easy. The seals are not too hard to find and I know RockAuto sells a complete new bearing kit.

If you start on this process and want more info on it, or scans from the Ford Service Manual which will make it easier, let me know.



Thank you so much, I ordered a over haul kit online for 80 bucks the original owner I bought it from was older and he never ever used the 4X4 the shift motor sized up from not being used and he never serviced the T case that was the first thing I did was change the fluid and ya could you send some scans from the book the only thing I got is an exploded view of it and my regular manual shows nothing on it
 






Removal

Removal

Step 12 tip: Remove bottom three bolts from below. Remove top two bolts through the access panel in the transmission tunnel. Pull back the carpet up front, remove the four bolts holding the access panel down, and reach through to easily access the bolts.
 

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Installation

Installation

There is no step 1 for some reason.

Step 2 tip: Install bottom three bolts from below. Install top two bolts through the access panel in the transmission tunnel. Pull back the carpet up front, remove the four bolts holding the access panel down, and reach through to easily access the bolts.
 

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Dissassembly pt1

Dissassembly pt1

Step 2 tip: A 30mm thin wall socket can be hard to find. I ordered a 30mm deep impact socket on Amazon for about $15. Then I had a machine shop lathe down the outside of the socket to fit inside the yoke.
 

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Disassembly Part 2

Disassembly Part 2

Step 3 tip: A 30mm thin wall socket can be hard to find. I ordered a 30mm deep impact socket on Amazon for about $15. Then I had a machine shop lathe down the outside of the socket to fit inside the yoke.
 

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Disassembly part 3

Disassembly part 3

Step 27 tip: Check the nylon wear pads for damage. If they need to be replaced, you can find replacements for not too much money. They are used in several transfer cases and some transmissions. The part numbers vary a little as there have been some revisions. The factory wear pads are usually opaque white. The replacements I installed on mine are somewhat milky colored. If your wear pads are missing (this is bad), you will likely find them in pieces clogging up the screen of the oil pump pick-up.
 

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Disassembly part 4 (final)

Disassembly part 4 (final)
 

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Re-Assembly Part 1

Re-Assembly Part 1
 

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Re-Assembly Part 2

Re-Assembly Part 2
 

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Re-Assembly Part 3

Re-Assembly Part 3
 

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Re-Assembly Part 4 (final)

Re-Assembly Part 4 (final)

Step 30 tip: The shift rails don't usually want to stand perfectly straight up, so the case won't want to go back together. This is inevitably after you put RTV all over the mating surfaces and you will swear and cuss. Try to avoid hammering on the case in your anger. It can shatter. Patience, wooooo sahhhhh. Keep trying and eventually they will slip into their proper holes. Sometimes shifting the case (4Hi, 4Lo, Neutral, 2Hi) can help.
 

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Specifications and Torque Values

Specifications and Torque Values
 

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Re:

To anyone viewing the above information:

First of all, please consider becoming an Elite Explorer if you have not already done so. Information like this is valuable and costs other people time and money to post and host. This forum has saved me thousands and can save you money too, so please become an Elite Explorer by clicking the "Elite Membership" link at the top of the page.

Second, this information is for a 1994 Ford Explorer with electronic shift Borg Warner 13-54 transfer case. Year to year differences may occur so FYI. Manual shift 13-54 cases use many of the same parts and are a little simpler inside. Contact me if you need assistance with a manual shift version and I may post up the same stuff for it.
 






thank you still have not rebuilt the t case yet had to go back to ohio for a month or two I just no it got worse the last two weeks i drove it im going to order all the wear parts and redo the hole thing and those scans are really nice and its going to make the job so much easier thank you for them and your help
 






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