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1995 Manual transmission issue

numskull223

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1995 Ford Explorer Sport
I have a 1995 4.0l 2wd 5 speed explorer sport

Some times the manual trans acts weird. Sometimes when I go to put it in 1st gear it doesn't want to go. But It will go into all other gears. But other times it's fine. I have no grinding or whining. I've replaced and bench bleed the clutch master cylinder, then bleed the slave cylinder.
I was told to put synthetic granny fluid in it. But not sure what to put in a manual tranny.

Any idea what's up with this?
Thanks
 



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FijiBill

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I use Valvoline DexMerc ATF in mine. I don't think synthetic ATF will cure anything but you can try with Mercon V as Ford says it is OK to use now. Anything besides ATF will gum up the oil flow to the bearings.

When my transmission had troubles shifting, I would have to turn the engine off in order to shift into first. The clutch seemed to always be somewhat engaged.

I thought the problem was with the slave cylinder, but actually the issue was the pilot bearing had disintegrated and was dragging. Replaced the pilot bearing, slave cylinder and the clutch (it was due for a new clutch and slave cylinder anyway) and now runs fine.

Hope you fix it! A manual 4.0 should last a long long time.
 






fast_dave

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If your Slave Cylinder has been bled and is in good condition, and your pilot bearing is fine, your 1st gear synchro-mesh is getting worn - common issue as you always start in 1st. My Ex has this issue at 203,000 + miles. More prevalent when the trans is cold.

Tip: When your trans doesn't want to go into 1st, rock the gear shift lever back towards 2nd & then quickly back towards 1st and it'll go in. Just stroke your gear lever back-and-forth softly. Going hard on it just jams things up.

Change your trans fluid to Synthetic ATF - (1) Gallon of Valvoline Synthetic ATF is $18 at Wally World.

b7-b95b61305ef9_4.798cb8fcaf9704a99a737916e34d2dcb.jpg
 






numskull223

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Thanks guys. This is my 1st ford explorer. I wanted a reason to change the clutch. It seems really too firm to press down. My other truck is a manual also. And after driving the explorer , and I hop into it, and I about slam the clutch pedal though the floorboard. Lol.
 






numskull223

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If your Slave Cylinder has been bled and is in good condition, and your pilot bearing is fine, your 1st gear synchro-mesh is getting worn - common issue as you always start in 1st. My Ex has this issue at 203,000 + miles. More prevalent when the trans is cold.

Tip: When your trans doesn't want to go into 1st, rock the gear shift lever back towards 2nd & then quickly back towards 1st and it'll go in. Just stroke your gear lever back-and-forth softly. Going hard on it just jams things up.

Change your trans fluid to Synthetic ATF - (1) Gallon of Valvoline Synthetic ATF is $18 at Wally World.

b7-b95b61305ef9_4.798cb8fcaf9704a99a737916e34d2dcb.jpg


So it only takes a gallon?
 












fast_dave

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BTW - numskull223,

I should add, I don't know which method you utilized to bleed your master & slave cylinder - as there are many and with greatly varying results of efficiency...

NOTE: The "gravity" bleeding methods with this Slave Cylinder is the LEAST efficient method and more than likely will not be 100% successful depending on how "much/if" you disassembled the hydraulic system.

With that said, I'm just saying; I learned early on from this forum, under certain circumstances, that the slave cylinder on the Ex has a reputation of being a beeotch to properly bleed. There are lots of places within the hydraulic system for air bubbles to hide and stay put.

Therefore, for 13 years, I always use one of these, for BOTH my slave cylinder AND f/r disc calipers.

It's available at Harbor Freight for around $25 before using the 20% off coupon.

Hope that helps and as a disclaimer, your mileage may vary ;-)

9020007_acn_cp7835_pri_larg.jpg
 






numskull223

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BTW - numskull223,

I should add, I don't know which method you utilized to bleed your master & slave cylinder - as there are many and with greatly varying results of efficiency...

NOTE: The "gravity" bleeding methods with this Slave Cylinder is the LEAST efficient method and more than likely will not be 100% successful depending on how "much/if" you disassembled the hydraulic system.

With that said, I'm just saying; I learned early on from this forum, under certain circumstances, that the slave cylinder on the Ex has a reputation of being a beeotch to properly bleed. There are lots of places within the hydraulic system for air bubbles to hide and stay put.

Therefore, for 13 years, I always use one of these, for BOTH my slave cylinder AND f/r disc calipers.

It's available at Harbor Freight for around $25 before using the 20% off coupon.

Hope that helps and as a disclaimer, your mileage may vary ;-)

9020007_acn_cp7835_pri_larg.jpg
Thanks. I read it was best to bench bleed the master cylinder because of the angle it sets. I I'm not sure about the mileage, cause the engine was changed and only had 65,000 on it. Body odometer shows 295,000. But the frontend was rebuilt, and drives and rides great, runs great also. Not sure if the tranny is original and has 295,000 on it.
I may go ahead and change the clutch pressure plate, and throw out bearing and slave cylinder, just to cover everything.
I have found that I really like the explorer with the 4.0L.
Thanks for the info!!
 






fast_dave

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Not sure if the tranny is original and has 295,000 on it.

It sounds like you have no idea about the previous service and mileage on the trans.

These manual transmissions have a very high OD gear, and are known to literally cook the ATF fluid if they have a lot of highway miles. Optimally, the trans should be services every 30 - 40,000 miles with new ATF. A good indication is the trans has been previously serviced is remove the inspection plate inside of your Ex, to look at the top of the trans, and see if the 3 (or 4) rubber plugs immediately behind the gear shift lever have been removed and replaced with either brass OR steel Dorman cups. On long highway trips, as temperatures & pressures built up, the original factory rubber plugs were known to blow out of their holes, and allow ATF to leak out all over the trans and exhaust system. Knowledgeable transmission service shops (and owners that knew about this design defect) replaced them. If the rubber plugs are still installed - assume the worst and hope for the best.

Also, before you have the trans removed to replace all the other parts, I'd suggest draining it's ATF fluid into a pan, walking out into the sunlight, and evaluating the fluid as you rock the pan back and forth. Good ATF fluid will be close to red, with a bare minimum of very fine brass (synchros) and silver metal (ball/roller bearings).

Cooked ATF fluid will be brown/black, smell like burnt garlic, and have a high content of brass and metal.

The reason I'm advising you dig into your trans a lil' deeper before you replace the other parts, is because you don't want to have to remove the trans shortly after replacing everything else.

Hope that helps -

PS - Another design "head scratcher" of the Ex clutch hydraulic system: at the end of the Master Cylinder Hydraulic Line, where it connects to the Slave Cylinder Hydraulic Line, there is a VERY SMALL black rubber O Ring that commonly gets lost/overlooked/not installed...
 






numskull223

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It sounds like you have no idea about the previous service and mileage on the trans.

These manual transmissions have a very high OD gear, and are known to literally cook the ATF fluid if they have a lot of highway miles. Optimally, the trans should be services every 30 - 40,000 miles with new ATF. A good indication is the trans has been previously serviced is remove the inspection plate inside of your Ex, to look at the top of the trans, and see if the 3 (or 4) rubber plugs immediately behind the gear shift lever have been removed and replaced with either brass OR steel Dorman cups. On long highway trips, as temperatures & pressures built up, the original factory rubber plugs were known to blow out of their holes, and allow ATF to leak out all over the trans and exhaust system. Knowledgeable transmission service shops (and owners that knew about this design defect) replaced them. If the rubber plugs are still installed - assume the worst and hope for the best.

Also, before you have the trans removed to replace all the other parts, I'd suggest draining it's ATF fluid into a pan, walking out into the sunlight, and evaluating the fluid as you rock the pan back and forth. Good ATF fluid will be close to red, with a bare minimum of very fine brass (synchros) and silver metal (ball/roller bearings).

Cooked ATF fluid will be brown/black, smell like burnt garlic, and have a high content of brass and metal.

The reason I'm advising you dig into your trans a lil' deeper before you replace the other parts, is because you don't want to have to remove the trans shortly after replacing everything else.

Hope that helps -

PS - Another design "head scratcher" of the Ex clutch hydraulic system: at the end of the Master Cylinder Hydraulic Line, where it connects to the Slave Cylinder Hydraulic Line, there is a VERY SMALL black rubber O Ring that commonly gets lost/overlooked/not installed...


Actually, The transmission mission fluid was changed out a few months ago. Maybe 3000 miles ago. The fellow I got it from had it changed at a checker lube place. He had that, an oil change done at the same time. Only reason I believed him is because he had record of it (reciept). I'm am going change it out myself this weekend.

Since the 5th is so tall, a round town at top speed of 55mph, you recommend just staying in 4th gear, since it's a manual tranny
 






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