2010 Explorer, 172k. Should I do the tensioners? | Ford Explorer Forums - Serious Explorations

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2010 Explorer, 172k. Should I do the tensioners?

GB1977

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City, State
Georgia
Year, Model & Trim Level
2010 Explorer XLT
We bought this a few years back. It seems to have been dealer maintained its whole life, and I've done everything I can to keep her in good shape. Changed every fluid in the car, etc. My question is, should I do the external timing tensioners? I haven't noticed any of the startup rattles yet. The oil change before last I put my flex wire camera up the oil drain plug and didn't see any plastic lying around. I've also sent out an oil sample to Blackstone(?) labs and it came back favorable. I've read on the internet people saying don't do it, others saying it should definitely be done and is a wear item. I can't find anything from FORD saying one way or the other. What does the forum conclude?
 



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If you want to keep the engine running for a long time then look into installing a pre-oiler. This has been done by several members here and they seem to have good luck with them. Since yours seems to be running well this might be worth considering.
 






Is it 4.6 3v?

Timing chain kits replacement procedure in this motors is pretty easy (lot of parts and tools to buy but it can be done )
20201204_122025.jpg


20201211_112522.jpg

Ive replaced mine in 125k because of low oil pressure symptoms.anyways the chain guides were cracked,tensioner orings melted and VVT locking pins almost weared at all.

If timing kit replacement considered ,always buy ford OEM parts.never buy these chinese crap kits
 






What Bazz said :)
Count all day to do it properly, but all shafts, sprockets and chains are marked and keyed. And once you take the fan and shroud off, it's pretty good access from the top and bottom.
And yes, use Motorcraft parts only. Don't forget to use some gasket maker in the corners of the timing cover and valve covers.
 






What Bazz said :)
Count all day to do it properly, but all shafts, sprockets and chains are marked and keyed. And once you take the fan and shroud off, it's pretty good access from the top and bottom.
And yes, use Motorcraft parts only. Don't forget to use some gasket maker in the corners of the timing cover and valve covers.
Is it prudent to not replace the rear chains and guides too? Just asking for my own educational purposes.
 






No any timing parts in the rear of 4.6 engine.only from the front (radiator removed for better crank pulley impact wrench access)
20201211_145809.jpg
in 4.0 you have to replace the rear timing kit parts too.
 












In this case of coarse you have to replace the whole kit including the rear portion
 






We bought this a few years back. It seems to have been dealer maintained its whole life, and I've done everything I can to keep her in good shape. Changed every fluid in the car, etc. My question is, should I do the external timing tensioners? I haven't noticed any of the startup rattles yet. The oil change before last I put my flex wire camera up the oil drain plug and didn't see any plastic lying around. I've also sent out an oil sample to Blackstone(?) labs and it came back favorable. I've read on the internet people saying don't do it, others saying it should definitely be done and is a wear item. I can't find anything from FORD saying one way or the other. What does the forum conclude?
I would. Changing mine out rid me of a noise I begain hearing at startup during cold temperatures. The old ones that came out at 110,000 could be compressed with my finger when primed. The new ones were unable to be compressed when they were primed with just my hand strength. I used oem Ford parts.
 






We bought this a few years back. It seems to have been dealer maintained its whole life, and I've done everything I can to keep her in good shape. Changed every fluid in the car, etc. My question is, should I do the external timing tensioners? I haven't noticed any of the startup rattles yet. The oil change before last I put my flex wire camera up the oil drain plug and didn't see any plastic lying around. I've also sent out an oil sample to Blackstone(?) labs and it came back favorable. I've read on the internet people saying don't do it, others saying it should definitely be done and is a wear item. I can't find anything from FORD saying one way or the other. What does the forum conclude?
Sorry I didn't clarify, it's a V6 4.0
 






I ask a mechanic that I trust about my lower mileage 4.0 and he said that he wouldn't do it without any noise at startup. It
(radiator removed for better crank pulley impact wrench access)
I could fit my air impact in and I barely hit the button, it spun out way faster than I thought and mashed the gun against my 2 month old OEM Ford radiator. Of course the direction switch was on the rear of the gun. In the end it didn't leak and I learned a lesson but it hurt my heart to see it.
Explorer Rad.jpg
 






I've heard reports that the springs in the newer tensioners are weaker than the original tensioners. If that's the case then the chains will not be taught until oil pressure builds up and there may be start up rattle. I suggest waiting for start up rattle before replacing the tensioners.
I installed an engine pre-oiler after replacing my front and rear cassettes. I've read that the majority of bearing wear occurs during "dry starts". I installed an Accusump (pressurized oil cylinder) in my 4.0L SOHC but a motorized pre-oiler in my rebuilt 4.6L DOHC. I prefer the motorized pre-oiler.
 






I installed an Accusump (pressurized oil cylinder) in my 4.0L SOHC but a motorized pre-oiler in my rebuilt 4.6L DOHC. I prefer the motorized pre-oiler.
I would be interested in hearing the details of your installs.
 






We bought this a few years back. It seems to have been dealer maintained its whole life, and I've done everything I can to keep her in good shape. Changed every fluid in the car, etc. My question is, should I do the external timing tensioners? I haven't noticed any of the startup rattles yet. The oil change before last I put my flex wire camera up the oil drain plug and didn't see any plastic lying around. I've also sent out an oil sample to Blackstone(?) labs and it came back favorable. I've read on the internet people saying don't do it, others saying it should definitely be done and is a wear item. I can't find anything from FORD saying one way or the other. What does the forum conclude?
I would not do it until you have to. To have it done is about $2k-$2500. You have to pull the engine out to do it because the cam chains are on the front and back of the motor.
 


















I have two 4.0L Explorers (3rd & 4th gen).
Ford upgraded the tensioners (can’t remember what year), it didn’t solve the problem with timing chain failures. Not worth the effort or expense, IMHO.
If you love the truck, body in great shape, and want to keep it for years, then replace both front and rear timing chains, cassettes, etc. with OEM Motorcraft or Cloyes kits. Its a big job that requires several special tools, so give yourself lots of time and choose when you want to do it ( instead of letting fate decide).
You should have a b.u. vehicle available …
Don’t wait for a chain to fail. My ‘02 suffered a failed chain( I bought it that way, so only $500 with a great body). Did the chains and the engine failed a short time later due to structural damage from the first failure. I was able to re-use the new chaines, etc., in a replacement engine, and its been running great ever since. Now my son’s car.
My 2010 has 145k miles. I plan to replace the chains premptively next summer ( its cold winters here in Michigan). I have another daily driver now (EV) but still love the truck for snow, carying lots of people (3 rows) or stuff, and towing. Hope for it to last many more years. Good luck.
 






I have two 4.0L Explorers (3rd & 4th gen).
Ford upgraded the tensioners (can’t remember what year), it didn’t solve the problem with timing chain failures. Not worth the effort or expense, IMHO.
If you love the truck, body in great shape, and want to keep it for years, then replace both front and rear timing chains, cassettes, etc. with OEM Motorcraft or Cloyes kits. Its a big job that requires several special tools, so give yourself lots of time and choose when you want to do it ( instead of letting fate decide).
You should have a b.u. vehicle available …
Don’t wait for a chain to fail. My ‘02 suffered a failed chain( I bought it that way, so only $500 with a great body). Did the chains and the engine failed a short time later due to structural damage from the first failure. I was able to re-use the new chaines, etc., in a replacement engine, and its been running great ever since. Now my son’s car.
My 2010 has 145k miles. I plan to replace the chains premptively next summer ( its cold winters here in Michigan). I have another daily driver now (EV) but still love the truck for snow, carying lots of people (3 rows) or stuff, and towing. Hope for it to last many more years. Good luck.
 






@Argentimage there aint no message with the post just a quote ;)
 



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Elite Explorer members see no advertisements, no banner ads, no double underlined links,.
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I have two 4.0L Explorers (3rd & 4th gen).
Ford upgraded the tensioners (can’t remember what year), it didn’t solve the problem with timing chain failures. Not worth the effort or expense, IMHO.
If you love the truck, body in great shape, and want to keep it for years, then replace both front and rear timing chains, cassettes, etc. with OEM Motorcraft or Cloyes kits. Its a big job that requires several special tools, so give yourself lots of time and choose when you want to do it ( instead of letting fate decide).
You should have a b.u. vehicle available …
Don’t wait for a chain to fail. My ‘02 suffered a failed chain( I bought it that way, so only $500 with a great body). Did the chains and the engine failed a short time later due to structural damage from the first failure. I was able to re-use the new chaines, etc., in a replacement engine, and its been running great ever since. Now my son’s car.
My 2010 has 145k miles. I plan to replace the chains premptively next summer ( its cold winters here in Michigan). I have another daily driver now (EV) but still love the truck for snow, carying lots of people (3 rows) or stuff, and towing. Hope for it to last many more years. Good luck.
There was another thread that pointed to YouTube videos pulling the Ranger engine 4.0L saying explorer is the same

Is it really possible to change front and rear timing chains without a full engine pull?

Any one have a videos of the process?
 






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