'22 Timberline High Beam Trigger for Light Bar | Ford Explorer Forums - Serious Explorations

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'22 Timberline High Beam Trigger for Light Bar

Dutch555

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City, State
Winnipeg, MB
Year, Model & Trim Level
2022 Explorer Timberline
Does anyone know where I can pull a high beam trigger from to run an LED light bar...?
I've tapped the high beam wire from the Body Control Module that connects to the headlamp assembly (See attached photo).
The issue is that the line is always hot, whether the high beams are on, or the low beams are on. This is also true when I test the pin on the connector from the rear of the headlight assembly.
Can anyone explain why that is, or point me in the right direction?
Thanks

Screenshot_20230416_221508_Drive.jpg
 



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Welcome to the Forum. :wave:
Sorry, can't help with your question, but if you have the light bar mounted or when you do, I picture would be appreciated.

Peter
 
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Welcome to the Forum. :wave:
Sorry, can't help with your question, but if you have the light bar mounted or when you do, I picture would be appreciated.

Peter
Hey, thanks. I don't intend on getting the light bar unless I can figure this out first. I've got my eye on the Dark Knight from BrightSource, though...
 
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Do you have a high beam shutter line? That might be capable of being used as a signal on an electronic flip-flop circuit to energize a relay for the light bar, assuming the shutter just activates for the moment of movement instead of receiving continual power in either position. If receiving continual power in one but not both positions, then can directly control a normally open vs normally closed relay circuit.

That looks like a really nice light bar for the size, but kind of expensive. There are several on amazon ranging from poor to "good enough" quality at $150USD or lower price points.
 
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Do you have a high beam shutter line? That might be capable of being used as a signal on an electronic flip-flop circuit to energize a relay for the light bar, assuming the shutter just activates for the moment of movement instead of receiving continual power in either position. If receiving continual power in one but not both positions, then can directly control a normally open vs normally closed relay circuit.

That looks like a really nice light bar for the size, but kind of expensive. There are several on amazon ranging from poor to "good enough" quality at $150USD or lower price points.
I'm not sure what a shutter is, so I'll google that. I assume there's some sort of a signal from the control module, but I have no idea what form that would take, or how to trap it. I believe there is a module within the headlamp itself that decodes the signal dictating which lamps within the assembly are active or not.

I haven't settled on a light bar, the styling of that one just really caught my attention. If I can figure out the trigger, I'll look more closely at my final option. Everything seems to be more expensive in CAD anyway, so will likely err on the side of quality so as to hopefully not have to endure the labour of mounting a bar more than once. I intend on putting it behind the grille just above the front licence plate...
 
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Why not a separate switch in the cabin? Seems like having an extremely bright off-road light that triggers every time you use your high beams could be dangerous for other drivers.
 
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Why not a separate switch in the cabin? Seems like having an extremely bright off-road light that triggers every time you use your high beams could be dangerous for other drivers.
That's why it gets triggered by the high beams, so you only have to operate one switch as opposed to two. There will be a switch in the cabin that allows for the use of the light bar with high beams, or disable it so you can use the high beams as usual....
 
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I'm not sure what a shutter is, so I'll google that. I assume there's some sort of a signal from the control module, but I have no idea what form that would take, or how to trap it. I believe there is a module within the headlamp itself that decodes the signal dictating which lamps within the assembly are active or not.
On some explorers, apparently the same lighting element is used for high and low beam, and the shutter solenoid is activated to move a physical shutter in the housing that blocks the light from shining as far. It would just be one of the other wires to the headlight housing, or two wires. I don't know how they set up control of it toggling between the two different open/shut, shutter states if yours even has this.. you only showed us a little chunk of the wiring diagram.
 
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On some explorers, apparently the same lighting element is used for high and low beam, and the shutter solenoid is activated to move a physical shutter in the housing that blocks the light from shining as far. It would just be one of the other wires to the headlight housing, or two wires. I don't know how they set up control of it toggling between the two different open/shut, shutter states if yours even has this.. you only showed us a little chunk of the wiring diagram.
I don't think there's a shutter. There's a separate lamp for the low and high beams...
Here's a wider view of the diagram and the connector on the headlamp...
 
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I don't think there's a shutter. There's a separate lamp for the low and high beams...
Here's a wider view of the diagram and the connector on the headlamp...
Not sure the .pdf worked...Here's some screen shots

Screenshot_20230417_191116_Drive.jpg


Screenshot_20230417_191038_Drive.jpg
 
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It is quite puzzling then, how it can be supplying power to the high beam even when it's not on. I am out of ideas for the moment.
 
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It is quite puzzling then, how it can be supplying power to the high beam even when it's not on. I am out of ideas for the moment.
It makes no sense to me... that's why I'm here....
 
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What does your multimeter say about the voltage on the high beam + lead on the connector Pin 2 when you switch between high and low beam? Perhaps it's always "hot" but the voltage changes to turn it on and off (i.e. the light itself has an activation threshold).

Also are there any modules on the back of the headlamp assembly that might be buried behind plastic? There might be a relay or transistor behind it that is triggered.
 
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I don't think there's a shutter. There's a separate lamp for the low and high beams...
Here's a wider view of the diagram and the connector on the headlamp...
I believe the pre-2016 Explorers used the shutter on the headlamps.

Peter
 
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My guess; and it is just that; is that those are control lines and that power is supplied via PIN 11 on the connector.
 
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Sorry for the delayed responses.. wasn't getting email notifications of the new posts. Also been busy diving into Lin Bus to see if I can use that control signals somehow...
 
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What does your multimeter say about the voltage on the high beam + lead on the connector Pin 2 when you switch between high and low beam? Perhaps it's always "hot" but the voltage changes to turn it on and off (i.e. the light itself has an activation threshold).

Also are there any modules on the back of the headlamp assembly that might be buried behind plastic? There might be a relay or transistor behind it that is triggered.
There's no change in the voltage between high beams on/off. It's either 12.4 off the battery, or 14.5 with the vehicle running.

There is definitely a control module built into the headlamp assembly. I believe that I'll either have to get into the headlamp assembly and tap between that module and the actual lamp, or tap into the Lin Bus system.....
 
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