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3D Printer: Most unbelievable gizmo ever

BrooklynBay

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The filament that I used is flexible. I made a couple of these rubber faucet covers, and found out that it's only flexible when it's very thin. It won't flex that much if you make it too thick.

There are a couple of all in one scanner/3D printer combos but from what I've read they still aren't completely perfected to make a perfect scan without tweaking the image on a computer first. The companies recommend covering the scanned object with some sort of powder or wax to help eliminate glare & reflections to increase the resolution. Most people either use a dedicated high resolution scanner or just draw a 3D model with a CAD program after taking measurements of the original object. There's a way to use a smartphone camera as the imager with the proper app but I don't know if the resolution is that great.

Any object could be sanded. I've read that acetone is used to smooth a rough object but it didn't seem to do anything for the rubber material that was used. Maybe it's only good for standard ABS or PLA which I haven't tried yet.
 


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BrooklynBay

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The 3D pen is very useful for repairing cracked plastic. I've been using a butane powered plastic welder for a while, and it's not that easy to use. It gets clogged very easily, and could only handle a small amount of plastic rod at a time. The 3D pen automatically feeds as much plastic filament as needed. It's easy to maintain a specific temperature & feeding speed plus you don't have a lot of wasted material which needs to be scraped off the tool compared to the butane welder.

One of my plastic refrigerator shelf supports cracked in 2 places. The 3D pen was able to repair it. The appearance of the material in the photo looks like hot melt glue but it's actually plastic which matches the color of the shelf.
 

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BrooklynBay

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After getting more practice using the 3D pen, I was able to make an improved faucet spout cover. The old cover was too thick, and was hard to press. It wasn't a good fit, and kept popping off. This new cover is smoother, fits better, is easy to press, and doesn't pop off.

The 3D pen came in handy for filling a hole in a PVC electrical box. I was surprised at how strong the repair was. It doesn't bend or pop off even if I apply a lot of pressure with my thumb.
 

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BrooklynBay

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BrooklynBay

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Rick

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Rick

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CDW6212R

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Rick

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MIT develops ink that changes the color of 3D printed objects

MIT develops ink that changes the color of 3D printed objects

New research from MIT released on Monday details a method called ColorFab for recoloring 3D printed objects after they have been printed. The method combines software, hardware and special 3D ink.

The effort aims to reduce waste: You won't need to print something again to change the color.

The method uses a specialized 3D printable ink that changes color when it's exposed to UV light. The new color remains even after the light has been removed.

On the ColorFab interface, users can upload a 3D model, choose a color pattern and print the object. MIT uses a UV light to change the 3D pixels on an item from transparent to colored, and a standard office projector to change them from colored to transparent.

180126125243-mit-3d-printing-color-780x439.jpg



The ink, developed by MIT, includes a base dye, a "photo initiator" and "light adaptable" dyes. The latter brings out the color in the base dye, while the photo initiator lets the base dye harden during printing. The inks can alter their appearance from transparent to colored when exposed to certain light.

The researchers say they can change the color of an object in about 20 minutes, but believe it will take less time in the future as the method improves. Another drawback: for now, the colors can appear grainy.

Although the research is focused on common 3D printed materials such as plastic, it could ultimately be used on a wide variety of other items, such as metals for jewelry.
 








shucker1

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Mankind can create wonders like this but still can't figure out a way to make headers for a Explorer 5.0l that fit and don't leak.

Heretic!

"Burn Him At The Stake!"

LOL.
 




CDW6212R

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Mankind can create wonders like this but still can't figure out a way to make headers for a Explorer 5.0l that fit and don't leak.

:rolleyes:

Hell, get that 3D printer and make some headers yourself.

I'd love one of those to test ideas out, for hair brained ideas. The trans cross member, fab one up and test fit it, then send it to your favorite builder.
 




BrooklynBay

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There are readily available spools of interesting filaments such as color changing with temperature, light, rainbow color, marble look, metal look, etc. New designs keep coming out. I saw brand new completely assembled 3D printers selling for under $200, so just about anybody who is interested could get into it. It's not thousands of dollars as it once was. You could get a spool of PLA or ABS filament for $10 to $20, and make a lot of things before the roll runs out.
 




CDW6212R

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I've got that on my wish list along with the new virtual reality drones, fun no matter what your age.
 




BrooklynBay

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You could start with a 3D pen to get the feel of 3D printing before you upgrade to a 3D printer. It's not the same but it will give you an idea of what you could do. I've used my 3D pen to make a couple of replacement faucet spout covers for pull out kitchen faucets, repair plastic electrical boxes, cover exposed battery terminals, etc. It comes in handy for quick repair jobs.
 




CDW6212R

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Interesting, I'll hunt that soon.
 


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