How to: - 4.0 OHV Refresh | Page 4 | Ford Explorer Forums - Serious Explorations

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How to: 4.0 OHV Refresh

Prefix for threads which are instructional.
, I'll just clean everything and reassemble
You can VERY CAREFULLY VERY LIGHTLY!!! clean up the brushes and slip ring with some 400-600 grit sand paper
This will reseat the brushes like new and kill the noise ....hopefully...
You have plenty of brush and copper material there
 



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I disagree!
I was referring to the timing chain system and the lack of durability.

Honestly, is it the plastics used in the guides and everything else that is the problem? Or maybe the chains were of a poor design/material? Might the tensioners have too much pressure causing excess wear on the guides/too much stretch on the chains?

There is no question that the single chain system of the OHV is much more robust and outlasts the SOHC in all regards. That is all I was referring to.
 






After some sanding the brush tips and slip rings, I wiped the alternator parts clean with an alcohol-soaked rag and reinstalled the brushes. No more chirping now!

I also installed the crankshaft pulley seal in my timing cover last night, and I'm nearing the point where I've cleaned up almost everything that was easily removed from the engine bay. The next phase will be cleaning on and around the engine itself (really hoping for some warmer weather).

One thing that occurred to me as I looked over my engine bay last night was how easy it would be to pull out the power steering pump now with the AC compressor and cooling system out of the way. I haven't noticed any leaks, but the pump was very noisy when I last drove the truck. Seems like a good time to go ahead and replace it. Anyone have suggestions as far as new vs. rebuilt or specific brands worth considering? I've read the AGR 808156 is a good upgrade, but Summit shows an estimated ship date of 5/3/22 -- I'd really like to be driving my truck sooner than that! RockAuto has a reman Cardone pump for just under $40 once the core goes back and the reman Motorcraft (only option I've seen with a translucent reservoir like the original) is just a little over $100.
 






As far as A/C pumps, I would only go with a Motorcraft reman if a new pump is not available.

In regards to the power steering pump, I had noise with my 1996 Explorer and with my 2002 Mustang and it is the same pump on both. I basically ended up flushing both by first jacking up the front end, suctioning out everything in the reservoirs, running it while suctioning at the lowest point to suck out as much fluid as possible while running it as little as possible. I then filled with with Amsoil power steering fluid, ran it while filling and rotating the rack back and forth to fill as much as possible. Did that drain/fill process three times. Every time the fluid the came out has less metal (graphite color) in it than the time before. The fourth fill was done with an entire container of the Amsoil red heavy power steering "fix" and the rest with Amsoil power steering fluid and did the bleed with the back and forth lock to lock. I then shut it off, waited a good 30 minutes, started it up, did the lock to lock only once, shut it down and repeated 4 times. I then checked the level and refilled it to the full mark and dropped it off the jackstands.

After that neither vehicle makes any noise, is quiet and the steering feels great. The design of the pump is prone to make noise, but they work great. I am replacing the fluid in the reservoir once every 2 years. I use a mix of 1/3 of the Amsoil "fix" and the rest being Amsoil power steering fluid each time a do it. That is the routine I did with the Mustang 5 years ago and did the second exchange last year and it is still silent. I don't have to do it again until next year.

The Explorer will have the exchange done again this year, but it is still quiet.
 






I'd reseal the factory pump

Like $10 and some time
 






I'd reseal the factory pump

Like $10 and some time
Is there a benefit to resealing if it's not currently leaking? I do like the lower cost of a seal kit compared to a reman pump, but I also don't want to screw something up and make a non-leaking unit into a leaky one...
 






Is there a benefit to resealing if it's not currently leaking? I do like the lower cost of a seal kit compared to a reman pump, but I also don't want to screw something up and make a non-leaking unit into a leaky one...
The benefit is the easy access to the pump, and empty system. The rebuilding is pretty straight forward. You need a puller for the pulley removal and the hardest part is sliding the half together. Do it now or do it later. It really up to you. You are getting side track by doing thing you do not really have too.
 






Any preferred brand for the PS pump seal kits?
 






Just sayin'

The p/s pumps with the internal translucent reservoir, as installed on the 4.0 OHV Sport's, are the same p/s pump as on the '82 - 90 FOX body mustang.

Those of us familiar with this design understand that no matter who made or remanufactured them, they all "groan" when the steering wheel is turned l/r (especially in the morning when they're cold).

As long as the wheels turn smoothly l/r the groan is not a sign of the pump going south.

With that said; unless you know the history of your 22 Year Old P/S Rack (OEM or Rebuilt), as well as if any regular maintenance was ever performed on it during it's service (i.e. p/s fluid changes, addition of a inline filter, etc.) I'd just leave everything be with the current p/s pump and get the engine running 1st.

I've read numerous posts very similar to yours where a guy re-works, in-parallel, all sorts of subsystems on a non-running vehicle.

Then when Spring comes and he turns the ignition key, he is greeted with more problems that he had last Fall when the vehicle went into the garage for the original problem.

Your mileage may vary -
 






Thanks everyone. At this point, I plan to just drain and flush the PS pump and reservoir and run it as-is until serious issues arise.

As for getting sidetracked from the core of this refresh, I'm mainly just trying to stay productive at this point. It's been so cold here that I have been running into issues of connectors and other plastic parts breaking while disassembling, so I decided to hold off from on-vehicle work till it warms up -- I was starting to do more harm than good. I have a propane heater, but it really can't keep up when it's below 25F or so. Hopefully I'll get a decent thaw over a weekend sometime soon. Until then, I'll be doing what little I can to make improvements to the truck!
 






Sounds like a solid plan...

Funny you mention the cold making plastic that much more brittle since I am ALWAYS concerned if I have an interior issue that is under warranty that the dealership won't allow the interior to come up to temp before ripping panels off and breaking things in the process...

My 2017 Lincoln MKT had the climate control buttons go out for the third time. Last time was back in 2020 and they replaced the FCIM (center-section "touch" controls). This time the covered it except for a $100 "warranty deductible", which I could have complained about, but considering the 2017+ vehicles you need to "marry" the module to the car, I just gladly agreed to pay it and can only hope this module is a newer "fixed" version and will last. Turns out the summer heat causes the original design to have the "+" temperature button "go bad", so I can only hope it won't do it with this module, since if it does it again I already know I can just go in a desolder the "touch chip" for that button and everything else will work. I am just afraid that if this one goes bad that ALL of them will and the more the dealership messes around with the interior, the more likely they will break something and then I get a rattle.

BTW, the MKT content it relevant to the forum considering the Explorer and the MKT share the exact same platform and the majority of the electrical and mechanical parts for any given year. ;)

Also, I have been on the Lincoln forums... Those idiots are just that... Idiots... I don't care to go there unless I am looking for something that is so specific it *might* be talked about. Those guys are such morons they run regular dino oil, or even "blends" with twin-turbo engines and think it is "ok" because the manual says so... Just like running 87 octane in the same... No form of reason or anything will convince them that the manual is a "bare minimum" resource that is only there to get you through the warranty period.
 






I pulled the PS pump this afternoon and I'm glad I did. Whether the flush helps or not, it'll be nice to clean everything and I'll have a lot more room to work now.
20220205_163825.jpg
 






Ya know, cleanup of parts is one of the most time consuming of the chores in doing any job, but also is one of the biggest factors in making sure there are not leaks outward (oil/coolant) or inward (air ingestion post throttlebody), and so so necessary for a "good job".

Yet, at the same time, it is amazing how LITTLE of it is done in a ton of repair shops. I mean I have had friends whose families have owned shops and I literally told them (and hurt the friendship) that I would NEVER take a vehicle there and tell everyone to NOT take their vehicles their because of the lack of detailed cleanup on most of the jobs I have seen.

Honestly, being "rushed" on a job is no excuse. For what they charge (ie, "book time") there is no way in hell they are losing money on ANY job, thus they are just ripping off the customer if they take shortcuts.

Worst part is, when the customer comes back because something isn't right, they will literally make **** up to charge extra for when it is all about fixing the issues THEY CREATED in doing a sub-standard job.

I was even called in to help diagnose a timing issue and they tore an optispark down to the internal module (which you should NEVER do as they are replaced as an assembly) for diagnostics and they didn't put new thermal compound on the module when reassembling like I told them to. Customer came back two days later and had the have the car towed in because it wouldn't run. I was there when they tried to tell him it was the ignition module that took out a new optispark and he would have to pay TWICE for an optispark they didn't even replace the first time. I was there, told my friend he better not pull that **** with me around and he better fix the guys car without a new ignition module as it was just the first optispark that the guy already paid for that he never got. My buddy got pissed, told me to leave at which point I told him, "I will call the police and pull witness unless you swap it out in front of me, I will spend my time here to make sure it is done right and once you give the car back with it running properly, I will leave, not before". Needless to say I had to tell them to scrape the old gaskets off the waterpump ("but they came off perfect from the block, why not reuse them?" was the response), to properly clean the block and to use new coolant (the jerk tech was going to refill with what they pulled out and even stated, "hey, they didn't pay for a coolant flush!"). Needless to say the guy that picked his car up was happy as could be it wasn't going to cost him anything else and it ran well (I also made them use a AC Delco NEW optispark, not a parts house reman that ALWAYS fail since they charged him the retail price of a new AC Delco the first time). I walked out with the guy and told him what went down, gave him my number and said that if he has any problems in the future to take it to a given dealership that I trusted that would make sure he wouldn't get screwed and to ask for a specific tech that I knew to be sure of that. Needless to say I haven't spoken to that "buddy" since. That was a good 17 years ago.
 






We finally got a warm weekend day in Wisconsin and I dove back into my 4.0. One of the last things to take apart before finishing cleaning and starting reassembly is my timing set. I spun the timing gears into position and gave the bolt my best twist -- the socket slipped right out and took some cam bolt with it. I sharpened the socket to a nice flat edge and tried again -- it slipped out along with more can bolt shavings.
20220220_131821.jpg


At this point, I know I'm going to replace the Cam bolt due to the stripped teeth, but how on earth can I get the thing out? Unfortunately the outside edge of the bolt head is tapered, so I can't clamp down on it. Anyone have a good strategy for this?
 






We finally got a warm weekend day in Wisconsin and I dove back into my 4.0. One of the last things to take apart before finishing cleaning and starting reassembly is my timing set. I spun the timing gears into position and gave the bolt my best twist -- the socket slipped right out and took some cam bolt with it. I sharpened the socket to a nice flat edge and tried again -- it slipped out along with more can bolt shavings.
View attachment 426557

At this point, I know I'm going to replace the Cam bolt due to the stripped teeth, but how on earth can I get the thing out? Unfortunately the outside edge of the bolt head is tapered, so I can't clamp down on it. Anyone have a good strategy for this?
Bolt extractor will take care of that. It will be hammered in and bites as you unscrew it.
 






Tack weld a nut on it ...or extractor kit ....
 






Simultaneous post...but DP beat me to the draw by milliseconds..
 






Also, this is EXACTLY why you NEVER use red loctite on engine components... If it needs to stay, blue loctite is plenty. If it won't stay with blue loctite it needs to be torqued to spec properly.

Ultimately there is nothing on a production car that needs red loctite EVER. It is mostly reserved for items that don't have a torque spec and need to be held in place due to vibration (think: motorcycle stuff). Custom stuff that is mostly ornamental, not mechanical.

I only mentions this because I have been screwed more than once by some jackass using red loctite where they shouldn't.

I just got in a new turbo for another project a couple of months ago... Those idiots used red loctite on the studs for the turbo drain into an iron center section. Why would you ever do something so stupid? Just torque the studs in place and be done. Not like the drain flange is going to be torqued in place with anymore more than "snug" considering there is a Viton coated metal spring gasket used. Oh, they also used red loctite on the bolts used to hold the wastegate actuator to the compressor housing... Again, totally stupid.
 






DIRECT Torch heat was your best friend (before the bolt became stripped).

Now employ @EB4X 's idea of welding a nut onto it...
 



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Thanks guys! I don't have a welder (hope to someday), so I'll have to pick up a bolt extractor kit and give it a go.

Can anyone confirm the part number for this bolt? I see the W703167-S430 looks about right but is listed online as the 4.0L SOHC Rear Balance / Jack Shaft Bolt. I'm struggling to find a part number that's specific to the pushrod 4.0.
 






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