97 v8 AWD left turn into parking lot space - sound from my driver side front like landing gear being lowered?? | Ford Explorer Forums - Serious Explorations

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97 v8 AWD left turn into parking lot space - sound from my driver side front like landing gear being lowered??

ELeBlanc

Well-Known Member
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Location
brooklyn ny
City, State
brooklyn, ny
Year, Model & Trim Level
1997 Ford Explorer
Any ideas? No sound when just driving. I've been told I have a leak in one of the front axle bushings - dont recall if driver or passenger side?
 



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It must be an axle seal on the differential (that’s leaking). If it’s coming from one side it’s most likely a CV axle. Take a look at the accordion like boot to see if there are tears.
 






It must be an axle seal on the differential (that’s leaking). If it’s coming from one side it’s most likely a CV axle. Take a look at the accordion like boot to see if there are tears.
Thanks. I think that is what my mechanic said by looking at vehicle on the lift before I heard anything. What would be average repair cost at a local mechanic? Also how do I judge the urgency.
 






If you can hear it, it’s days are numbered. If it breaks while driving it’s no bueno. I’d expect several hundred to repair at a shop.
 






Any ideas? No sound when just driving. I've been told I have a leak in one of the front axle bushings - dont recall if driver or passenger
A hard turn to either side can produce a clunk when the steering stops need to be lubed
 






If it's a CV joint, a noise is near the end of life. Those run about $60 or so at auto parts stores. The labor is an hour or two depending on skills and tools for a CV axle.

Suspension03.JPG
 






If it's a CV joint, a noise is near the end of life. Those run about $60 or so at auto parts stores. The labor is an hour or two depending on skills and tools for a CV axle.

View attachment 326848
thanks very much for info and even more for picture. Is that thing on the right a 'steering dampener'?
 






That's the right TRE from the rack. For just the CV shaft, the TRE and calipers have to come off. The large hub nut has to be removed before the tire is off the ground, and the three hub bolts are the toughest part sometimes. Those take a shallow 15mm socket, and 3/8" breaker bar or long ratchet. Beyond that and hammering the TRE to make it let go, it's not a terrible task.
 






That's the right TRE from the rack. For just the CV shaft, the TRE and calipers have to come off. The large hub nut has to be removed before the tire is off the ground, and the three hub bolts are the toughest part sometimes. Those take a shallow 15mm socket, and 3/8" breaker bar or long ratchet. Beyond that and hammering the TRE to make it let go, it's not a terrible task.
Ok so admitting my lack of knowledge - what is a TRE? Maybe I should just get both replaced at the same time?

And totally unrelated question - I have a leak from the rear main seal. To see how serious I'm going to put something like a cardboard box on driveway underneath the vehicle. To check the leak do I leave the car running in the driveway or do I check when it's parked after a drive. I'm assuming I leave it running in the driveway.
 






Sorry, the TRE is the tie rod end, from the steering rack. Those are a weak link and if very old or unknown mileage, are good to replace, maybe a $20 item. The alignment should be done after those, while the CV axle doesn't require one.

For most leaks, it takes a lot of time to identify just where they are from. The rear main seal is easy to identify, and common, but not fixible without R&Ring the engine or trans. Follow the leak(wetness), up and forward to where it's dry. Leaks all go down and back, so for example, a coolant leak at the top front could hit the ground at the back of the engine.
 






Sorry, the TRE is the tie rod end, from the steering rack. Those are a weak link and if very old or unknown mileage, are good to replace, maybe a $20 item. The alignment should be done after those, while the CV axle doesn't require one.

For most leaks, it takes a lot of time to identify just where they are from. The rear main seal is easy to identify, and common, but not fixible without R&Ring the engine or trans. Follow the leak(wetness), up and forward to where it's dry. Leaks all go down and back, so for example, a coolant leak at the top front could hit the ground at the back of the engine.
My mechanic said the leak was rear main seal. My question was about how to see the volume of the leak with the car sitting in the driveway. Thanks for more input...
 






You’ve got fixed gear, not a retract 😂
 






If it's the main seal, front or rear, the best treatment is an oil additive. There are many and not really effective, but the type made for rejuvenating(expanding) the seals, will do the most good. I have tried several, and gotten my leaks reduced by about a third.
 






To check the volume of your oil loss, change or top the oil up to full and check every week. If it’s less than a quart between changes, I’d forget it.
 






To check the volume of your oil loss, change or top the oil up to full and check every week. If it’s less than a quart between changes, I’d forget it.
Ok can do that. So checking leak volume on driveway is not effective?
 






It can be, but it’ll leak more when it’s warm and running. Some leaks only leak when running, but you’ll get residual dripping hours after shutting it off.
 












Ditto, the oil on the ground is a nuisance, but how much is consumed you have to care about. Watch the dipstick and how far you drive per week. Then you can figure out how much is actually being used.
 






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