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Advantages of using an oil catch can! Here's the proof.

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94Eddie

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Because they build carbon soot crap mobiles like BMW/ VW/ Audi. Even they are using more high composite materials in their engines to reduce the problems that you are talking about. Buy a vehicle from this decade then it won't have an issue, the problems you speak of are found on 10-15 years old motors. No amount of K&N filters or Oil Catch cans are going to save a 100-200k mile motor from any long term effects. Only taking care of the oil changes and routine maintenance will. Oil catch cans serve a purpose on older rides but again it is like a band aid covering other issues. Ethanol is more of an enemy to old rides then uncontrollable oil sludge build up. I have rebuild many an intake on 99-2010 rides all caused mainly from poor maintenance and ethanol build up.

but to answer your question they do this to get a more clean combustion and get more complete burn. Same reason why Dodge uses 2 spark plugs in their Hemi motors per cylinder and the Ford 6.2 liter boss does the same. Reduces emissions and improves fuel economy. I have already prepared for the future and that is EV. Everything in the next 10 years will be EV. I plan to keep my sentimental STI since it is worth more now than what I paid for it when new in 2016.
GDI fuel delivery was done to improve emissions and mpg. The early versions used only one injector placed to deliver fuel directly into the combustion chamber. This eliminated the ability of previously used port fuel injector systems to clean carbon buildup off the intake valves. Hence the single port GDI engines suffer from very bad carbon buildup on the intake valves. Carbon buildup is caused from oil being sucked into the intake track via the PVC system. In fact, carbon buildup on single injection GDI engines was such a major issue the manufacturers added back a port injector on GDI systems. This injector does not spray every combustion cycle. It does this periodically to keep most of the benefits of GDI in place while helping to wash carbon off the intake valves. Catch cans serve a very worthwhile purpose on single port GDI engines. The jury is still out on the effectiveness of dual port injection which is a very good reason to use a catch can on them. The only way to remove carbon from the intake valves is to pull the intake off which isn't an inexpensive job on today's engines.
The future is EV. Period, especially with Porsche and Tesla building sub 8 second quarter rides.
EVs have nothing to do with this thread unless you are telling people with GDI turbocharged engines to sell what they have and buy an EV. Also, battery powered EVs have massive issues too so thinking they are the future might be premature. Hydrogen powered vehicles have many advantages over battery EVs and many companies, higher education institutions and research facilities are making big advances in this technology. The world's electrical system and generaing capacity isn't even close to having the ability to support EVs in any large number. It would take trillions upon trillions of dollars to make battery EVs viable worldwide. Then there is the massive environmental impacts to producing EVs. Especially the batteries. In the end it might be more environmentally friendly to use fossil fuels more efficiently than strip mine the world for trace minerals and metals. If we go with battery EVs then what fuel will we burn to generate the electricity required? Green energy won't even come close to meeting the demand. This is why hydrogen has a very good chance to by the long term solution, IMO. Also, that 8 second Tesla guzzles electricity at a ferocious pace when driven hard. Make a few passes and then sit around for an hour charging the battery from a fossil fuel or uranium fired generating plant. So much for all the environmental reasons to go EV.
 


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DoraAExplorer

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GDI fuel delivery was done to improve emissions and mpg. The early versions used only one injector placed to deliver fuel directly into the combustion chamber. This eliminated the ability of previously used port fuel injector systems to clean carbon buildup off the intake valves. Hence the single port GDI engines suffer from very bad carbon buildup on the intake valves. Carbon buildup is caused from oil being sucked into the intake track via the PVC system. In fact, carbon buildup on single injection GDI engines was such a major issue the manufacturers added back a port injector on GDI systems. This injector does not spray every combustion cycle. It does this periodically to keep most of the benefits of GDI in place while helping to wash carbon off the intake valves. Catch cans serve a very worthwhile purpose on single port GDI engines. The jury is still out on the effectiveness of dual port injection which is a very good reason to use a catch can on them. The only way to remove carbon from the intake valves is to pull the intake off which isn't an inexpensive job on today's engines.

EVs have nothing to do with this thread unless you are telling people with GDI turbocharged engines to sell what they have and buy an EV. Also, battery powered EVs have massive issues too so thinking they are the future might be premature. Hydrogen powered vehicles have many advantages over battery EVs and many companies, higher education institutions and research facilities are making big advances in this technology. The world's electrical system and generaing capacity isn't even close to having the ability to support EVs in any large number. It would take trillions upon trillions of dollars to make battery EVs viable worldwide. Then there is the massive environmental impacts to producing EVs. Especially the batteries. In the end it might be more environmentally friendly to use fossil fuels more efficiently than strip mine the world for trace minerals and metals. If we go with battery EVs then what fuel will we burn to generate the electricity required? Green energy won't even come close to meeting the demand. This is why hydrogen has a very good chance to by the long term solution, IMO. Also, that 8 second Tesla guzzles electricity at a ferocious pace when driven hard. Make a few passes and then sit around for an hour charging the battery from a fossil fuel or uranium fired generating plant. So much for all the environmental reasons to go EV.


You are way off base on everything you posted, but carry on. I love internal combustion engines actually and would love to acquire an old muscle car while I still can. The problem with the internet it is full of so much misinformation and wrong information.
 




blackstallion

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I have owned 100s of turbo vehicles and again they serve no purpose. Put it in sport mode blow the soot and carbon out under 17-20 lbs of boost. You will not have an issue with the need of excessive hydrocarbons building in the manifolds and throttle bodies. Again, most of the issues with a catch can are made by low mileage vehicles that tend to putt around. I would not put a catch can on a modern turbo vehicle and will not run one. To each their own but you are really doing no benefits to your engine other than bypassing the crank case pressure ventilation system.
Dora Dora Dora the Exploraaa....the fact that you're making the claim that you've owned "100's of turbo vehicles", means you've more likely than not never driven one for an extended period to witness where the oil blow by would start causing issues? (unless you're Methuselah!) I typically drive my vehicles for 10 years and to at least 200k, so doing so without requiring partial engine teardowns and overhauls to clean the valve's would be preferred.

To address your comment from the earlier post, I am using full synthetic, did my first oil change at 1000 miles out of abundance of caution, and will NOT follow the OLMs extended maintenance recommendation (more likely than not, 7500 intervals). Regardless of driving it in "Sport" mode as you alluded to to burn off the excess, over 100k+ miles, there will be accumulated oil baked onto the valves without multi port injection, so a catch can to capture as much oil blow by as possible seems reasonable. I guess only time will tell.

And btw, I'm not sure you understand the use of the phrase "it's a unicorn" or "leprechaun", because I just SHOWED you pictures of several ounces of oil and water captured in the can...so there's your leprechaun, or maybe more like a gremlin! Are you telling you're confident that that oil will ALL be burned off before having a chance to accumulate over the years? My guess is not.

So yes, in the end, I agree with your statement, "to each his own".
 




blackstallion

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You are way off base on everything you posted, but carry on. I love internal combustion engines actually and would love to acquire an old muscle car while I still can. The problem with the internet it is full of so much misinformation and wrong information.
Haha 😂 be careful, the internet may infect you, it's contagious!
 








blackstallion

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Right, it is like a virus.
Look, I love ICEs as well. I have a '91 331 stroker Mustang that I have tons of fun with at the track. BUT, when OEMs migrated away from PI to DI in pursuit of reduced HCs to save the planet, they traded of the unintended but beneficial side affects of PI and reduced reliability of their engine's. Of course they're ok with that since the engine's can still typically make 100k miles within the warranty period without issue, and then sell you a service contract to tear the top half of your engine off to correct their design trade off (or dare I say flaw!).
 




94Eddie

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You are way off base on everything you posted, but carry on.
You aren't even in the stadium. My guess is that you are just too stubborn to admit you are wrong.
I love internal combustion engines actually and would love to acquire an old muscle car while I still can. The problem with the internet it is full of so much misinformation and wrong information.
The internet is a tool to be used. Use a tool wrong and you break stuff, hurt yourself or just get frustrated and quit. I found my current Mountaineer and 2007 Mustang on the internet. They have turned out to be very good vehicles. I wouldn't have found them if I had not used the internet effectively. Explorer Forum is an excellent example of just how good the internet can be as a resource. There are millions of websites, YouTube channels etc. that are just as good. It isn't all that hard to pick the good ones from the bad ones.
 




DoraAExplorer

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I'm not taking the bate mate, good luck with your catch cans and k & n filters
 




94Eddie

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MNgopher

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I always enjoy when folks trot out the question about why automakers have gone to dual injection (port and Direct) as they believe the only reason they did so is because it fits the narrative about excessive carbon buildup on intake valves...

Conveniently, they ignore the facts that revolved around incomplete combustion increasing fine soot particle production in GDI engines, and the increasing regulation in that arena... But whatever fits your preconceived agenda and narrative I guess... Is there a benefit to the intake valves? Sure. Is that the sole reason it was done? Hardly... Particularly on engine platforms where carbon buildup on the intake valves has not been an issue...

Catch can believers adhere to the belief that intentionally condensing vapors that under normal operation are exactly that - vapors - is evidence of immediate harm and damage to the engine. You can add one to literally any engine system, and be shocked at the amount of stuff it condenses. Yet the engines soldier on...

What % of engines get catch cans installed? Do they demonstrably last longer than ones without? Are there controlled studies showing the supposed advantage to engine wear and durability?

Is cleaner better? Sure. Does it actually make a difference in long term usage? Good luck answering that one without some major hand waving and gesturing...
 




94Eddie

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I always enjoy when folks trot out the question about why automakers have gone to dual injection (port and Direct) as they believe the only reason they did so is because it fits the narrative about excessive carbon buildup on intake valves...

Conveniently, they ignore the facts that revolved around incomplete combustion increasing fine soot particle production in GDI engines, and the increasing regulation in that arena... But whatever fits your preconceived agenda and narrative I guess... Is there a benefit to the intake valves? Sure. Is that the sole reason it was done? Hardly... Particularly on engine platforms where carbon buildup on the intake valves has not been an issue...

Catch can believers adhere to the belief that intentionally condensing vapors that under normal operation are exactly that - vapors - is evidence of immediate harm and damage to the engine. You can add one to literally any engine system, and be shocked at the amount of stuff it condenses. Yet the engines soldier on...

What % of engines get catch cans installed? Do they demonstrably last longer than ones without? Are there controlled studies showing the supposed advantage to engine wear and durability?

Is cleaner better? Sure. Does it actually make a difference in long term usage? Good luck answering that one without some major hand waving and gesturing...
Keeping carbon from building up on the intake valves is one of the major reasons the second injection port was added to GDI engines. This is just fact. Where does the carbon come from to deposit on the intake valves? It is from the PVC system. Logic dictates that any reduction of carbon reaching the intake valves will keep carbon deposits on the intake valves lower. A catch can will intercept a lot of the carbon reaching the intake valves. This is fact. There is ZERO downside to installing a quality catch can and plenty of upside to doing so. There are also newer oils on the market to help with carbon buildup in GDI engines from piston blowby.
 




Rick

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Better to have oil in the can than burnt onto the valves.
There is ZERO downside to installing a quality catch can and plenty of upside to doing so. There are also newer oils on the market to help with carbon buildup in GDI engines from piston blowby.

With that I fully agree.

I am sick of the poor dead horse being beaten, so with this, I will close the thread ;)

:dead:
 




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