Axle code 46 in a 2005 Ex. Which years have the same differential? | Ford Explorer Forums - Serious Explorations

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Axle code 46 in a 2005 Ex. Which years have the same differential?

Number Twelve

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City, State
15 miles west of Tampa Florida
Year, Model & Trim Level
2005 Ford Explorer XLT
Going to the junk yard in 12 hours. Which years and models might have axle 46 in their rear?
ps, it's a 3.73 non-locking differential
V671J043020888D
 



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Going to the junk yard in 12 hours. Which years and models might have axle 46 in their rear?
ps, it's a 3.73 non-locking differential
V671J043020888D
@Number Twelve
My 2004 has a "45", Shop Manual says that's 3.55 Non-Limited Slip. Shows possible use also of 46, and D6 3.73 L.S. imp
 






2002-2005 should work.
 






I kind of assumed any Gen 3 would fit, but this one has some odd fittings like a 1 year only driver's seat so I had to ask.
 






I know it's bad form to post the same Thread twice, but I have 1 hour left before I go to the junk yard and I can't believe there is no way to check interchangability. This is the best Explorer Forum I have found and nobody knows which cars are basically an Explorer with a different label or where I can look up which models and which years use the same rear end?

That's not what I expected.:(
 


















Got the pumpkin in the trunk.:)
I sorted through at least 30 Explorers in two different junk yards and found exactly ONE with a 46 rear end.
Well...that saved me trying to figure out which one had the least amount of miles on it.:D
I guess I'll clean it up and see if anything looks wrong inside it.

Surprise!...the only thing holding the CV joints together is the rubber bootie.:eek:
That makes it easy to get the half-shafts off at the junk yard.:cool:

I'm going to lay down and moan about how much I hurt until about Wednesday.:(
 






I would like to find a set of 4.10s to put TrueTracs in, and then swap them in place of my current 3.73 opens. :burnout:
 






I would like to find a set of 4.10s to put TrueTracs in, and then swap them in place of my current 3.73 opens. :burnout:
@drdoom
I believe I've seen such gearsets offered new in the aftermarket, maybe Summit or Jegs. I suspect, but am not certain, that there is
no clearance behind the pumpkin to remove ring and pinion. You probably already know. There is a funky big support to contend with in removing the center section. Have you set up gears in 8.8s? I'm pretty good myself with Ford's 9-inch. imp
 






Imp I thought of you when I posted, I recall you post good knowledge and experience with gears. Yes the center sections have to be dropped for repairs/mods. I have never set gears before, which is why I would like an extra set to have in the shop, assuming it's going to take some time for me to complete.
 






Imp I thought of you when I posted, I recall you post good knowledge and experience with gears. Yes the center sections have to be dropped for repairs/mods. I have never set gears before, which is why I would like an extra set to have in the shop, assuming it's going to take some time for me to complete.
@drdoom
Doc, I learned the hard way by ruining a brand new set of 4.57s, after having set up maybe 10 or more previously. Simplest of mistakes due to lack of enough knowledge, the 9-inch Ford has big, round threaded spacers which encircle the outer races of the differential support roller bearings. Some of the "Integral" designs of center sections have them also, but 8.8 Ford does not, relying on shims beneath the bearings. The 9-inch design made cake of the job of locating the ring gear in the right place, while at the same time applying the proper pre-load". My mistake was to not know those threaded rings were movable after the cap bolts were tightened. Tip-off should have been the little "keepers" which bolted on top of the caps, and entered holes around the adjustment rings. I had mis-threaded one, then torqued down the caps. Trying this baby out, not even a block from home, horrible, loud, frightening, screaming whine! No cover plate, center section has to come out to inspect. The gear teeth were incredibly scored. I set these things up hit and miss, meaning assemble, check tooth contact pattern, then adjust as necessary. Sometimes took a number of tries. That's what you get lacking the correct specialized tools to set up hypoid gears.

Your 2005 (?) has a rear 8.8". Unusual in that case is aluminum alloy, less indestructible that nodular cast iron. (assuming 4th. Gen. same as 3rd.). Someone correct me if not, please! Generally, the end of the pinion gear has painted on numbers, indicating the pinion depth location, measured from some reference surface, usually the gasket surface for the cover plate. Those numbers must be used along with your particular pumpkin to determine pinion shim thickness for location purposes. Then comes pinion bearing preload, most often achieved through use of a "crush sleeve" which takes up several thousand pounds of pinion flange nut tightening (thread tension) force. Since pinion brg. preload is just about the most important consideration in successful set-up, the biggies like High-Performance options use(d) a SOLID bearing spacer, which is located between the two bearing roller/cone assemblies. Much more reliable than the crush-sleeve but far trickier to do. Crush-sleeve introduces possible error due to incorrect torque of nut being obtained, result can be either too loose bearings (BAD), or too tight (bad, but works, running too hot).

Finally, "backlash", clearance between ring and pinion teeth, measured at the outer periphery of the ring, called out as rotational clearance with pinion held stationary, usually never less than 0.010". Backlash also affects tooth contact pattern, so all these factors play into one-another. When in doubt, more lash is better than too little, and contact pattern on "Drive" teeth of ring can be slightly off-center towards the inside diameter, if necessary to obtain good lash.

Oh, yeah, almost forgot. Drive tooth face rises upwards from ring gear at nearly a right-angle. Very important as "Drive" always sees far more torque than "Coast" teeth, which rise up at a much shallower angle, that contributing to "spreading" forces pushing the gears apart during operation. Now, the final "kick": Typically, 4X4s take a regular rear-use pumpkin, turn it around, and mount it up front. GREAT! Now you have the "Coast" teeth DRIVING the front axles! Somewhere, decades ago, on an F-Series, I spotted the front pumpkin mounted UPSIDE-DOWN! From FORD! That put the teeth in proper perspective for forward driving. Robbed the "drowning-bath" of oil from the pinion bearings, though. Later, the "fix" became "special" gearsets cut in reverse, which allowed normal (pinion at bottom) mounting. Beware of the pitfall of reverse cut gears! imp
 






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