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Back Bearings - Really?

cw212010

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Now I know the back bearings are not nice to work on. Whilst changing the rotors the other day I had a look at it all. I understand that the bearings need pressed but it looks rather simple if I just unbolt three joints and remove the 30mm bolt on the end of the shaft and replace the whole damn thing.

Or is there more to this?
 



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Now I know the back bearings are not nice to work on. Whilst changing the rotors the other day I had a look at it all. I understand that the bearings need pressed but it looks rather simple if I just unbolt three joints and remove the 30mm bolt on the end of the shaft and replace the whole damn thing.

Or is there more to this?
That's the problem, I don't think the whole damn thing is available...or not that I could find anyway. When I did mine, I bought a bearing & hub set and pressed the bearing back into the knuckle. And getting those joints apart was a real PITA, for me at least.
 






Talking about the rear, correct? Did both about 3 years ago, fronts this past week. They are easier in front. If you can unscrew the hub retaining bolts. I never saw such incredibly strong thread-locker before. Then, getting the hubs out of the knuckle, no go with the standard slide-hammer. Had to cold-chisel them out. Original set-up, 154K. imp
 






I've done the fronts before. I know the local junk yard sells you the whole arm and hub. So theoretically if I purchase used ones (Only keeping the car till next year) and fit the whole thing it should surely be a case of three bolts and sliding it off the shaft?
 






It took me 5 hours to, "remove 3 bolts and slide it off the shaft" and I had all the right tools.
The knuckle was cold welded to the splines and the hub puller required 3 minutes on a 1/2 inch air gun to pull the knuckle off. The ball joint looking things required hundreds of whacks with a 3 pound sledge.

Everything is simple, right after you know how, but understanding it and doing it are two completely different things. A quotation of me talking to a customer: "I can think every move of this job in 6 minutes, but it took 3 qualified and experienced, journeyman level workers 16 hours to actually do the work." That's a ratio of 480 times as long to do it as to think it. If you can think of every move required for this bearing job in 37.5 seconds, that would account for 5 hours of actual work at the ratio I just demonstrated, and don't forget to think about the 6 different sizes of socket wrenches, some of them metric, some of them American.

You could get lucky, you might be younger than my 65 years, but I'm telling you now, it's called work because it is work.
 






I just did this recently (a week ago) and if you don't have the right tools it can't be done. The 3 bolts that hold the knuckle is a major work by itself and then the hub and bearing assembly. If it was serviced before then consider yourself lucky because it will be a walk in the park pressing the bearing out otherwise it will be a days work. I used a combination of hub grappler and press although a press with the right adapters can do it. Not understanding how the hub is pressed to the bearing will result in early demise of the bearing too.

The fronts are very easy to do 3 bolts and a new assembly and your done in an hour or less, that's why I don't care if I put in chinese junk in there because of the less work involve.



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Not understanding how the hub is pressed to the bearing will result in early demise of the bearing too.
This is true. If you don't brace the inner race of the back half of the bearing as you're pressing the hub in, it will ruin the new bearing.

I'm glad I'm not the only one who had to hammer the piss out of those joints to get them apart.:laugh: The center one I never did get apart & said screw it, and just unbolted the shaft at the other end, by the spare tire. So I had to do the bearing swap with the long shaft clanking around on everything in the shop.:crazy:
 












I'm glad I'm not the only one who had to hammer the piss out of those joints to get them apart.:laugh:
Well, I will admit that after I wire brushed the dinguses, cleaned them with mineral spirits, polished them with 600 wet&dry, and spun a wire type of copper pipe cleaner brush down the sockets, they went back together like good sex. Hopefully, the liberal application of anti-seize compound will allow them to come apart in the future without wailing on them for half an hour (each) with a small sledge hammer.:hammer:

One thing I did to avoid bending or shattering anything was to use some galvanized steel angle iron for a punch to soften the impact point. I doubt a 5 pound Harbor Freight sledge is hardened steel, but I know for sure that galvanized steel angle iron is soft. It also gets the impact where you want it, instead of missing several times with the hammer, and you know you're going to miss a couple of time when it takes 200 or 300 swats to get it loose.
 






I definitely gave mine the "good sex" treatment, too. LOL

Lincolnshibuya, thanks for that link, I think I'm gonna have to get one of those. It's reasonably priced, too!
 






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