box above spare tire? | Ford Explorer Forums - Serious Explorations

  • Register Today It's free!

box above spare tire?

JakePSD

Well-Known Member
Joined
March 25, 2010
Messages
404
Reaction score
1
City, State
Ohio
Year, Model & Trim Level
2003 Mercury Mountaineer
I have a couple of questions for you guys. First off, what are the two black boxes above the spare tire? I noticed today crawling around underneath it that the cover under them has pretty much disintegrated. The other question I have is about fuel tank removal. I need to replace my fuel pump, hence the reason I was crawling around under there. How hard is it to drop the tank and is there anything special that I need to know?
 



Join the Elite Explorers for $20 each year.
Elite Explorer members see no advertisements, no banner ads, no double underlined links,.
Add an avatar, upload photo attachments, and more!
.





Those boxes are part of your evap system.

To drop your tank, you want it as low as possible of fuel (gas gets heavy when you have a lot sloshing around).

You won't really need any special tools except a fuel line disconnect tool.
 






The black plastic boxes above the spare tire are the charcoal canister evaporative control. It absorbs gas vapors from the fuel tank. The metal bracket that holds this up is like swiss cheese on my '97 as well. I have been pondering what to do with mine. Whenever replacing the spare, I have to stuff those boxes and related junk back into place so the spare goes back up.
 






Some had a plastic bracket that's how im fixing mine
 






Any one relocate the evap canister?
 












dropping the tank is pretty easy, unless you're facing as much rust and mud as the pics in the previous post...

1. get as much fuel out of the tank as possible. it's pretty light when empty.
2. if the engine still runs, pull the fuel pump relay to eliminate pressure in the fuel line.
3. get the rear of the truck as high off the ground as possible and support it on safety stands, place them under the rear spring perches. getting the front off the ground is optional.
4. remove the driver's side rear tire.
5. remove the screw clamps from the rubber fuel and vent lines, at the tank, pull them loose and tuck them behind the rear sway bar.
6. assuming you don't have skid plates, remove the 2 bolts at the front of the tank. drop the front of the tank onto the cast iron support bracket. if you want, you can use a piece of wire, or wire-tie, to hold the tank on the bracket and act as a hinge.
7. support the rear of the tank on a floor jack with a small piece of plywood.
8. remove the tank strap bolt and strap (it keys into the frame).
9. lower the rear of the tank until you can access the electrical plugs, evap line and fuel line. unplug everything (fuel line requires a good 3/8" disconnect tool, squeeze the evap line connector between your thump and forefinger to release it while pulling).
10. drop the tank to the ground, at the rear, and slide it toward the rear to drop the front and it's out (i like to drop it on a piece of cardboard, so it's easy to slide it out).

don't forget to replace your fuel filter (requires a 5/16" disconnect tool) and put back the fuel pump relay. turn the key on/off about 5 times before your first start.
 






I tie-wrapped the plastic boxes to whatever is left of the metal tray.
 






dropping the tank is pretty easy, unless you're facing as much rust and mud as the pics in the previous post...

1. get as much fuel out of the tank as possible. it's pretty light when empty.
2. if the engine still runs, pull the fuel pump relay to eliminate pressure in the fuel line.
3. get the rear of the truck as high off the ground as possible and support it on safety stands, place them under the rear spring perches. getting the front off the ground is optional.
4. remove the driver's side rear tire.
5. remove the screw clamps from the rubber fuel and vent lines, at the tank, pull them loose and tuck them behind the rear sway bar.
6. assuming you don't have skid plates, remove the 2 bolts at the front of the tank. drop the front of the tank onto the cast iron support bracket. if you want, you can use a piece of wire, or wire-tie, to hold the tank on the bracket and act as a hinge.
7. support the rear of the tank on a floor jack with a small piece of plywood.
8. remove the tank strap bolt and strap (it keys into the frame).
9. lower the rear of the tank until you can access the electrical plugs, evap line and fuel line. unplug everything (fuel line requires a good 3/8" disconnect tool, squeeze the evap line connector between your thump and forefinger to release it while pulling).
10. drop the tank to the ground, at the rear, and slide it toward the rear to drop the front and it's out (i like to drop it on a piece of cardboard, so it's easy to slide it out).

don't forget to replace your fuel filter (requires a 5/16" disconnect tool) and put back the fuel pump relay. turn the key on/off about 5 times before your first start.

Great instructions! :thumbsup:
 






Thanks for the help. Decided to drop it as opposed to cutting the floor out. My filler neck and evap lines don't have hose clamps though. They have some other sort of fitting that I haven't messed with enough to figure out. Plus the fact that I'm not the one doing the job, a friend is with my supervision thanks to me having a broken collar bone...
 












The plastic bracket for the evap canisters is from 2000/2001
 






Back
Top