Broken facet on a spark plug | Ford Explorer Forums - Serious Explorations

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Broken facet on a spark plug

Larkin_1

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Year, Model & Trim Level
Explorer 2007 v8
Good evening! First of all sorry for my English.
Bought another 2007 Ford Explorer V8. Tried to change the spark plug- 7 of them came out without any problem, but the last one did not. The reason is that i applied to many force and wrenched off the facet (sorry if it is a wrong name for it- i attached the picture of the thing.)
122eb1a2b1c3.jpg


The spark plug did not make any turn, is there any way to take it out?
 
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No, the spark plug did not brake, the engine is working perfect, without any shake. I just cannot remove it now and change, because socket spanner wrench scrolls on the spark plug. Dont know how long this spark plug will work, i know that it was changed 70 000 km ago.
Here is a foto of broken facet
c33221b4cc13.jpg
 
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Are you using a SIX POINT socket?
yes, first i used a six point socket 9/16" (14,2mm), then i tried 14mm socket- no result. As you see on the picture, the facet on the spark plug is round, so now it is impossible to use any sockets because they scrooll:(
 




































Try either of them. When I was extracting my # 8, I never rounded the hex, it just snapped since it was seized there beyond salvage point.

I hope you get it out, pour some PB blaster in the well first, let it soak.

I am just worried that if it did not budge with the socket first, it may be really stuck in there.
 






I bought my 06 XLT V-8 with 87k miles on it. You guys are making me scared about the spark plugs!
 






I do not mean to scare you, but when you try to turn the first one, you'll be sweating ....

I turn them on mine every 10-15 k miles now, and even than they give me hard time.
 


















Guys,

Remember always use a little Nickle Based Never Seize when putting new plugs back in.

Just a little on the threads make your life easier next time!

Or if you really want the good stuff use this like I do.

http://www.texacone.com/antiseizecompound.html
 






shucker1, thanks for attention, but those topics will not help me, because the spark plug did not brake, its fine and works perfect, only the hex is rounded...
 






Finaly got it out using 13mm socket and hand hammer...
84c9b5ec0570.jpg
 






Finaly got it out using 13mm socket and hand hammer...
84c9b5ec0570.jpg

Could you determine where the resistance was from that caused the hex to round? Once you embedded the socket on the plug, did it take much effort to unscrew it?

Both the threads and the ground barrel look pretty clean. From the picture, there is no evidence as to why you might have had that problem.

I picked up this set that you posted, just in case. Don't really know how good they work but I sure I will get an opportunity with something or other.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Grip-Tite-Super-Socket-Rounded-Bolt-Removers-17-pc-SAE-Set-/151250928754
 



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Guys,

Remember always use a little Nickle Based Never Seize when putting new plugs back in.

Just a little on the threads make your life easier next time!

Or if you really want the good stuff use this like I do.

http://www.texacone.com/antiseizecompound.html

Do not lubricate the threads. The threads are not typically the problem; it's the shield between the threads and the electrode. If you lubricate the threads, and apply the specified torque, you will be putting too much clamp load on the joint (due to reduced friction), possibly yielding the female threads in the aluminum head. You could reduce the torque, but to how much (???).

Instead, recommendation from TSB and other sources is to lubricate the shield, but do not lubricate the threads, nor the electrode itself.
 






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