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dog owners, need your help!

I have had my border collie for 9 years now and she trained very easily because they are very smart and loyal dogs couldnt have gotten a better dog. But this breed is know to sometimes have ear problems so be sure to keep them clean in the past 2 years I have put over 4,000 dollars into my dog for vet bills pertaining to her ears, But she's wearth every penny.
 



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Just to give you some numbers in $$$.

I have a six month old German Shepard/Pit Bull and so far I have spent:
$60 first vaccine shot
$102 second and third shots + 2 pills to get rid of stomach worms
$10 of 10-lb bag of dry food each month.
$20 worth of Treats

Lastly, countless numbers of Bounty paper towels to clean up after him! :D
 






How Much Does it Cost to Own a Pet?
My-Dog.info > Getting a Dog or Puppy

By Steph Bairey

There is plenty of information out there about how to care for and train your pet. However, most leave out a very important factor: what it will cost!

The estimates below are expressed in US Dollars and based on prices of food, accessories, and veterinary care in the Pacific Northwest, USA; your expenses may vary. However, they are excellent guidelines! This list covers dogs, cats, rodents, ferrets, fish, birds, amphibians, lizards, snakes, tarantulas, and crustaceans. For each, we discuss the initial cost (when you first buy the pet), and the maintenance cost (which you will pay year-round).

These are also minimum figures -- you can, and are likely to, pay much more for any pet. All animals need toys, bedding, and food, but pampering them with expensive pet beds, large cages or kennels, and an abundance or variety of treats, toys, and foods will increase the costs below considerably.

You might also be surprised to see that we've included veterinary costs for pets like frogs and tarantulas. However, it is essential that you budget for these examinations! No animal should be a "throw- away pet," and all should receive proper medical care. Illnesses and accidents are a part of life, and will occur. Even the healthiest pet needs annual vet exams, to catch potential health problems before they become serious (and more expensive to treat).

It's important to keep these figures in mind when checking out that cute little lizard in the pet store, on sale for only $5.99! Thousands of pet owners buy what they consider "cheap" pets, only to find out later that they are paying hundreds of dollars on habitat and care. You should also note that the costs listed here are purely money out of pocket, and do not include the amount of time you will need to spend training, cleaning, and interacting with your pet. Time is, after all, money.

Dogs
Initial cost: Bringing home a new puppy will cost you about $335. This includes $10 for puppy food, $150 for shots, $25 for sundries such as collar, lead, tag, and food dishes, $30 for toys, $20 for treats, $20 for grooming supplies, $30 for licensing, and $50 for the puppy itself.

Maintenance: Each year you will spend about $120 on dog food, $250 on vet bills, $15 on sundries such as collar, lead, and tag, $60 on toys, $130 on treats, $30 on licensing, $70 on medications like flea treatments or ear mite oil, and $55 on a short kennel stay, for an average of $730 per year, or $14 per week.

Cats
Initial cost: Bringing home a new kitten will cost you about $305. This includes $10 for cat food, $100 for shots, $7 for sundries such as collar and tag, $10 for toys, $5 for treats, $15 on grooming supplies, and $30 for the kitten itself.

Maintenance: Each year you will spend about $75 on cat food, $120 on vet bills, $10 on sundries such as collar and tag, $25 on toys, $25 on treats, $20 on grooming supplies, and $70 on medications like flea treatments or ear mite oil, for an average of $355 per year, or $7 per week.

Rodents
(includes rats, mice, gerbils, hamsters, and guinea pigs)

Initial cost: Bringing home a new rodent will cost you about $55. This includes $20 for a 10 gallon aquarium or small cage, $25 on cage accessories such as bedding and an exercise wheel, and $10 for the rodent itself.

Maintenance: Each year you will spend about $50 on food, $50 on vet bills, $45 on bedding, and $15 on sundries such as dishes and cage accessories, for an average of $160 per year, or $3 per week.

Ferrets
Initial cost: Bringing home a new ferret will cost you about $105. This includes $50 for an appropriate cage, $25 for cage accessories such as hammock and food dishes, and $30 for the ferret itself.

Maintenance: Each year you will spend about $100 on food, $150 on vet bills, $45 on bedding, and $15 on sundries such as dishes and cage accessories, for an average of $310 per year, or $6 per week.

Fish
(includes freshwater and saltwater)

Initial cost: Bringing home a new fish will cost you at least $100. You can expect to pay $35 for a 10 gallon aquarium with hood and light fixture, $10 on a bulb, $10 on an automatic timer, and $25 on tank accessories like gravel and plants. The larger fish, like catfish and cichlids, will need at least a 40 gallon tank, which can cost about $200. Fish themselves run anywhere from $1 per goldfish to hundreds of dollars for the more exotic species.

Maintenance: Each year you will spend about $65 on food, $35 on water treatment chemicals, $40 on medication, and $60 for equipment such as filters and cleaning supplies, for an average of $200 per year, or $4 per week.

Birds
(includes parrots, ****atiels, budgies, and smaller birds)

Initial cost: Bringing home a new bird will cost you at least $350. This includes $50 for a small cage, $25 for cage accessories like food dishes and toys, $250 for the initial vet visit, and between $25 to $2,000 for the bird itself. The larger birds, like macaws and amazons, will need a cage that costs at least $300, and some people spend $2000 or more!

Maintenance: Each year you will spend about $300 on food, $350 on vet bills, $100 on toys and treats, and $20 on grooming supplies, for an average of $770 per year, or $15 per week.

Amphibians
(includes frogs, toads, newts, and salamanders)

Initial cost: Bringing home a new amphibian will cost you about $110. This includes $20 for a 10 gallon aquarium, $20 for a light fixture, $10 for a bulb, $10 for an automatic timer, $15 for cage accessories like gravel, branches and plants, $5 for water treatment chemicals, $10 for cleaning equipment like brushes and nets, and $10 for the amphibian itself.

Maintenance: Each year you will spend about $50 on food, $50 on vet bills, $10 on cage accessories like plants and branches, $15 on water treatment chemicals, and $20 on lamp bulbs, for an average of $145 per year, or $3 per week.

Lizards
(includes iguanas, monitors, bearded dragons, chameleons, uromastyx, anoles, skinks, and geckos)

Initial cost: Bringing home a new lizard will cost about 10 times the cost of the lizard itself, for a minimum of $100. For smaller lizards, you can expect to pay $20 for a 10 gallon aquarium, $50 on light fixtures and bulbs, $10 on an automatic timer, $25 on cage accessories like branches and plants, and a minimum of $10 for the lizard itself. The larger lizards, like iguanas, monitors, and water dragons will need a cage that costs at least $200, and some people spend $2000 or more.

Maintenance: Each year you will spend about $300 on food, $350 on vet bills, $10 on cage accessories like plants and branches, $20 on grooming supplies, and $60 on lamp bulbs, for an average of $745 per year, or $14 per week.

Snakes
(includes boa constrictors, pythons, corn snakes, king snakes, and others)

Initial cost: Bringing home a new snake will cost about 10 times the cost of the snake itself, for a minimum of $100. For smaller snakes, you can expect to pay $20 for a 10 gallon aquarium, $50 on light fixtures and bulbs, $10 on an automatic timer, $25 on cage accessories like branches and plants, and a minimum of $10 for the snake itself. The larger snakes, like boas and pythons, will need a cage that costs at least $200, and some people spend $2000 or more.

Maintenance: Each year you will spend about $300 on prey animals, $150 on vet bills, $10 on cage accessories like plants and branches, and $60 on lamp bulbs, for an average of $520 per year, or $10 per week.

Tarantulas
Initial cost: Bringing home a new tarantula will cost about $95. You can expect to pay $20 for a 10 gallon aquarium, $20 on a light fixture, $10 on a bulb, $10 on an automatic timer, and $15 on cage accessories like substrate and hidey holes, and a minimum of $20 for the tarantula itself.

Maintenance: Each year you will spend about $50 on food, $20 on lamp bulbs, and $20 on cage accessories like substrate, for an average of $90 per year, or $2 per week.

Crustaceans
(includes hermit crabs and crayfish)

Initial cost: Bringing home a new crustacean will cost you about $93. You can expect to pay $20 for a 10 gallon aquarium, $25 for an undertank heater, $15 for thermometer and humidity gauges, $3 for a misting bottle, $25 for cage accessories like branches and gravel, and $5 for the for crustacean itself.

Maintenance: Each year you will spend about $30 on food, and $10 on cage accessories like branches and sand, for an average of $40 per year, or less than $1 per week.

Copyright 2001, Steph Bairey -- All Rights Reserved

Steph Bairey is a web developer and pet owner, with 25 years of pet care experience and 30-40 pets at any one time. Get immediate, reliable answers to your pet care questions at Steph's website, Practical Pet Care, located at http://www.practical-pet-care.com.
 






I'm not sure I buy that list. You need a lot more than that for a puppy, most notably missing is a crate. No crate, no housetraining. A crate will be your dog's den and they will love it and feel safe when they're in it. Out of this comes housetraining because they will do almost anything to keep from soiling their den. A crate for a Border collie will run you $100 at least.

Then with ferrets, my son and his fiance have ferrets and their costs are all messed up there too. First of all the ferret itself will run $100-$150. According to them everything marked for "ferrets" is more expensive, they need a multitiered cage that costs at least $100, plus their vet bills are MUCH more expensive than a dog's because they're "exotic". They're also prone to a lot of cancers that can cost thousands of dollars per ferret as they get older. They just got a new puppy and my son was telling me that he pays for the dog and she pays for the ferrets. They took the dog and one ferret to the vet. His bill for the pup was $48, her bill for the Ferret was $260.

So I'd disregard that list.

Anyways I totally agree, I can't imagine not having a dog, well well worth it. They are a LOT of work though. In a lot of ways a puppy is harder to raise than a child. A child at least is immobile, stays where you put it, and its able to be taken to grocery stores, restaurants etc. If you're crate/housetraining a puppy they can't stay for more than 3- 31/2 hours at a time and you'll be surprised as to how hard it is to keep a schedule to where you can get home to take a puppy out. Dinner and a movie out? Forget about it for at least 6 months. Vacations? Hah! Try and travel with a pupp puking all over the car.

BUT its only 6 mos to a year, then you have a companion that will be your shadow for the next 15, so its worth it.
 






Stephen, I never had a clue that those elongated rats ( ferrets ) cost that much to keep. Well, the simple solution is to feed them to the dog....
 






LOL. Its actually really funny, the dog thinks its a ferret and they bounce around together all over the place.

They're actually really neat pets, a lot like cats. They're litter trained and play with yarn and feathers and things like that. Wouldn't be my choice though...

They're nice to visit with and then send home lol
 












I know this is an old thread, but I know people asked to see pictures, so: ask and ye shall recieve. Here's my new dog, Bailey. I brought her home yesterday and she's fitting in just fine. I am already glad about the decision I made to get her, and thanks to everyone who responded for your help and good wishes. Anyways, here's the pictures!
















 












congrats man!
 












Don't forget about the cost of replacing your carpet after they pi$$ , poop , barf on it a few hundred times.
After our 2 cats and 2 dogs are gone , the only pets we will have will live in a cage.
 






Listen to Stephen. They grow up very, very fast, and the opportunity to take pictures of them when they are still fuzzy will be gone before you think. :) He looks fiesty.
 






Stephen said:
...
BUT its only 6 mos to a year, then you have a companion that will be your shadow for the next 15, so its worth it.
That's beautiful, Stephen. :) :thumbsup:

Can't miss this opportunity to post pics of my dog. :) 1st pic is when I first got him at 2 months. 2nd pic is current at now 8 months old. I have 4 more months to go Stephen! :D
 

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flipped 98x said:
Don't forget about the cost of replacing your carpet after they pi$$ , poop , barf on it a few hundred times.
After our 2 cats and 2 dogs are gone , the only pets we will have will live in a cage.

No offense but you must not be very adept at training animals. I've never had a cat or dog go in my house past 4 months of age, ever and I've had a lot of animals. As long as you work hard when they're young to make sure they understand that they can ONLY go in the specified area be in a litterbox for a cat or outside for a dog and make sure to keep accidents to an absolute minimum to stop there from being any smell dogs and cats housebreak themselves, they're genetically designed to dislike going to the bathroom in their living space. As long as you start right I personally don't see what the big deal about housetraining is.

As for destroying the carpeting. I have white carpeting in most of my house and I don't see how any pet stain can ruin it. Pet stains are organic and the easiest stains to remove. Call Stanley Steemer or rent a carpet shampooer from the grocery store and its all fixed.

As for barf, if you feed your pet properly and not off the table etc how often do they get sick? Once twice a year? Maybe? Thats not their fault, living things get sick. The positives of owning a great dog far outweigh any mistakes they may make in the house.

Caged pets? Talk about smell. I think if you don't feel having a great pet is worth investing the time in training them properly you'd be best to stay away from pets in the future.

X-Factor, I love the shirt lol
 


















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