Explorer 94 on 37, help! | Ford Explorer Forums - Serious Explorations

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Explorer 94 on 37, help!

jhon2808

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City, State
Santo Domingo
Year, Model & Trim Level
Ford explorer 1994
Im planing to go 37 on my 4 Door 94 explorer, ive been looking on skyjacker and rough country kit, but rough country only have 4 inch lift for explorer but for broncos and f150 they do have a 6 lift kit in wich im interest. My question is, is not same fitment for broncos, explorer and f150 until 1996 with TTB???

Also im planing to do SOA, so i wont need those extras parts that come with the kit for working on the rear, what would you recomend?

Im going 5.13, i have manual transmisión and transfer case

Thanks
 



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They are not the same. TTB ended on the Explorer in 1994. Any real wheeling on 37s should probably be on a solid axle. You’re gonna have to take it easy or you’re gonna eat up front ends.
 






The Dana 35 ttb can handle 37’s in a gen i explorer if and I mean if you are easy on it. Wheel spin and you may start to break things.

Clearing 37’s with a 6” suspension drop bracket kit and 3” body lift can get interesting the tires will want to be in the firewall a lot

Skyjacker is about 3x the strength of a rough country lift
You will need the extended radius arms don’t try to get away without them

You should really consider 35’s first and maybe work your way up to 37

You will want to run 96-97 ranger outers with dual piston calipers or better yet convert to Dana 44 outers on those Dana 35 beams

There are other “lifts” and suspensions to consider depending on your budget and the trucks intended use
 






The Dana 35 ttb can handle 37’s in a gen i explorer if and I mean if you are easy on it. Wheel spin and you may start to break things.

Clearing 37’s with a 6” suspension drop bracket kit and 3” body lift can get interesting the tires will want to be in the firewall a lot

Skyjacker is about 3x the strength of a rough country lift
You will need the extended radius arms don’t try to get away without them

You should really consider 35’s first and maybe work your way up to 37

You will want to run 96-97 ranger outers with dual piston calipers or better yet convert to Dana 44 outers on those Dana 35 beams

There are other “lifts” and suspensions to consider depending on your budget and the trucks intended use
The body lift is a most to fit 37, if i have to do some triming in the front and put 2 inch wheel spacer i Will. I think i Will have skyjackers 6 inch coils and shocks along with james duff drop bracket. i Will custom made long arms with some 3/4 heims .

About the front diff, dana 44 housing is bigger than dana 35?? If they fit on the same housing i can swap diff with and axle?? Or i need a complete swap?
 






37s and wheel spacers are asking for trouble. Also when you space the wheels out the arc the wheel makes turning is exaggerated and cause other clearance issues.
 






37s and wheel spacers are asking for trouble. Also when you space the wheels out the arc the wheel makes turning is exaggerated and cause other clearance issues.
Maybe a wheelset with enough back spacing?
 






The wider you are the more lever and moment arm you put on the front suspension.
 






What are you going to use the Explorer for? What type of off roading? Lockers? Have you looked through the modified 91-94 or the off road forums? Figure out ehat you are planning with this rig, then build it to fit. It will save you a lot of rebuilding. If I went straight to the custom suspension and axles I have now, I would have saved thousands in dollars and man hours.

I have 5:13 gears with 35's and a 700R4 trans which has a lower 1st gear ratio than the OEM trans, and it's gutless. Anything over 35 MPH, gutless. Also have a solid front axle, HP D44. A manual trans will help, buy I only know a few rigs that went bigger than 35's with the TTB, and they all broke stuff, even on moderate trails. 6" suspension and 3" body lift is a lot of height just to go 2" taller tires, which only gives you 1" more height than 35's. Will also still need to trim the front fenders a bunch, and probably the front of the rear fenderwells or push the axle back 2". My 35's contacted the front of the rear fenderwells. I knocked it forward about a half inch with a mallet and pieces of wood, then rolled the edges all the way around so they would not catch on anything.

What I'm getting at, it's a lot of work for 35's to clear, and I have more than 8" of suspension lift over stock. I was planning on going to 37's when I did my axle swap, but decided to keep on the safe side with 35's and lockers.

Wheel spacers move the center of the wheel away from center of th3 bearings, which puts uneven pressure on the outer bearings. You will have problems with this, heck, most people have the wheel bearings wear much faster with larger tires without the spacers. There is not much space between the bearings on a D35, which creates uneven leverage if the wheels are not centered over the bearings.
 






Check this thread:


It describes installing D44 knuckles on the D35 TTB axle. The advantage is bigger wheel bearings. D35 wheel bearings don't like big tires without constant upkeep.
 






What are you going to use the Explorer for? What type of off roading? Lockers? Have you looked through the modified 91-94 or the off road forums? Figure out ehat you are planning with this rig, then build it to fit. It will save you a lot of rebuilding. If I went straight to the custom suspension and axles I have now, I would have saved thousands in dollars and man hours.

I have 5:13 gears with 35's and a 700R4 trans which has a lower 1st gear ratio than the OEM trans, and it's gutless. Anything over 35 MPH, gutless. Also have a solid front axle, HP D44. A manual trans will help, buy I only know a few rigs that went bigger than 35's with the TTB, and they all broke stuff, even on moderate trails. 6" suspension and 3" body lift is a lot of height just to go 2" taller tires, which only gives you 1" more height than 35's. Will also still need to trim the front fenders a bunch, and probably the front of the rear fenderwells or push the axle back 2". My 35's contacted the front of the rear fenderwells. I knocked it forward about a half inch with a mallet and pieces of wood, then rolled the edges all the way around so they would not catch on anything.

What I'm getting at, it's a lot of work for 35's to clear, and I have more than 8" of suspension lift over stock. I was planning on going to 37's when I did my axle swap, but decided to keep on the safe side with 35's and lockers.

Wheel spacers move the center of the wheel away from center of th3 bearings, which puts uneven pressure on the outer bearings. You will have problems with this, heck, most people have the wheel bearings wear much faster with larger tires without the spacers. There is not much space between the bearings on a D35, which creates uneven leverage if the wheels are not centered over the bearings.
Ufff your advice is really help full, i think i Will stick to 35s, then Will see what we can improve. Im building it for moderate off road, trails, but nothing extreme.

I have M5R1 manual transmision, ill be installing front lockers along with 5.13 gears, now i have 3.73 LSD. Basically the front end will be a frankenstein, James duff drop brackets, skyjacker coils (6 height) and shocks, custom made long arms and pitman.

My first decision on going 37 was because my cousin and i are building together and he install 35 on his 2000 ranger without a lift and i found that rig to low to be 35. He is going with 2 inch shackels, torsion cranks and 3 body lift. Will be posting a picture of both rig next to each other.

20230501_173856.jpg
 






Check this thread:


It describes installing D44 knuckles on the D35 TTB axle. The advantage is bigger wheel bearings. D35 wheel bearings don't like big tires without constant upkeep.
But they are the same splines number???
 






I ran 37s on my 93 Ranger for 12 years, as a daily driver on the freeway and a moderately serious off-roader both. 4.56 gears, manual trans, lockers in the later years. I had a 4” suspension and 3” body lift, and still trimmed fenders on the front. I ran the 37s on regular aftermarket 8” rims that have standard 3.75” backspace.
I snapped a front left outer axle twice, both times it was with wheels fully turned, the weakest position. If you drive smart enough, you can avoid breaking axles for the most part.
My advice is stay as low as you can if you’re going to wheel it. Don’t use wheel spacers, or else buy stock in a bearing company.
 






I ran 37s on my 93 Ranger for 12 years, as a daily driver on the freeway and a moderately serious off-roader both. 4.56 gears, manual trans, lockers in the later years. I had a 4” suspension and 3” body lift, and still trimmed fenders on the front. I ran the 37s on regular aftermarket 8” rims that have standard 3.75” backspace.
I snapped a front left outer axle twice, both times it was with wheels fully turned, the weakest position. If you drive smart enough, you can avoid breaking axles for the most part.
My advice is stay as low as you can if you’re going to wheel it. Don’t use wheel spacers, or else buy stock in a bearing company.
Thats good to know 37 and 4.56, what was your top speed in higway???

Im not into wheeling, just trails and some heavy mud

You have pictures?
 






I tend to over build my rigs, I wheel them hard and don't like breaking things out on the trails. The stock dana 35 bearing set up is marginal at best, the bearings are good size but the narrow spacing in-between them is a problem for anything with a larger than stock tire, and tire width tends to be the biggest issue. I did the Dana 44 outer swap a little different than most people and if you have access to some decent salvage yards you should be able to find parts on the cheap. I used 95' Bronco spindles, rotors, and stub axles you have to have the bronco rotor machined down to the same diameter as the explorer rotors and you also need to make the brake pads thinner by about .25". Gen 1 version 2.0 build
 






Thats good to know 37 and 4.56, what was your top speed in higway???

Im not into wheeling, just trails and some heavy mud

You have pictures?
I would cruise 70-75, Maybe it could go faster but I didn’t want to in a lifted truck.
Pictures are all on this forum, most would be in the offroad runs section.
 






I tend to over build my rigs, I wheel them hard and don't like breaking things out on the trails. The stock dana 35 bearing set up is marginal at best, the bearings are good size but the narrow spacing in-between them is a problem for anything with a larger than stock tire, and tire width tends to be the biggest issue. I did the Dana 44 outer swap a little different than most people and if you have access to some decent salvage yards you should be able to find parts on the cheap. I used 95' Bronco spindles, rotors, and stub axles you have to have the bronco rotor machined down to the same diameter as the explorer rotors and you also need to make the brake pads thinner by about .25". Gen 1 version 2.0 build
At the end doing a solid axle swap is almost the same, to mano details in the proces
 






At the end doing a solid axle swap is almost the same, to mano details in the proces
But that would be too easy! I have solid axle Early Bronco's and even have a couple of extra Bronco dana 44's that have tempted me for a swap and the TTB is better when I like to drive fast out in the South Dakota badlands.
 






I would cruise 70-75, Maybe it could go faster but I didn’t want to in a lifted truck.
Pictures are all on this forum, most would be in the offroad runs section.
Uffffff 75 is enough
 






But that would be too easy! I have solid axle Early Bronco's and even have a couple of extra Bronco dana 44's that have tempted me for a swap and the TTB is better when I like to drive fast out in the South Dakota badlands.
I also think of that, ttb should be better when driving on trails above 35 mph
 



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Ttb is better for driving trails period lol

Solid axle is better for “crawling” that is for sure
The ttb has some disadvantages like awkward steering angles and the beams are not equal length, but it is a form of ifs and ifs handles the bumps and dips way better then a solid axle.
Long love the ttb!
One extra u joint!
 






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