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Explorer vs Ranger in snow

bisjoe

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City, State
Sammamish, WA
Last week had an opportunity to drive the Explorer in a nasty ice and snow storm and while many people parked and walked she made it right through with no problem at all, in 4WD H and fairly new BF G Trailmaster tires.

I'm thinking of a late model Ranger for business use, and am curious if anyone has driven both, how the lighter Ranger (4WD Supercab) would do in the snow compared to the Explorer. We're at 800 feet and there are nothing but hills around here.
 



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If you can put a toolbox or something of the like with weight in it, it should do just fine.

EDIT:

Here is RangerX's bed. Granted you lose a lot of bed space for cargo, but for the season it would work.

Carnage_5.jpg
 






If you can put a toolbox or something of the like with weight in it, it should do just fine.

EDIT:

Here is RangerX's bed. Granted you lose a lot of bed space for cargo, but for the season it would work.

Carnage_5.jpg

I'd be using it to haul 4'x8' signs sometimes, which is hard in the Explorer because I have to leave the tailage open and suck exhaust. Are you talking 200lbs or so? I could use sand bags that lie flat and keep the space I need and have the signs stick out the back.
 


















as long as you have some weight in the back she'll be fine. With no weight my old ranger ass was everyware when we had our first rains. Use to scare me at first. Now I wish I still had it to throw around:D It also fun to screw with the passangers... ahhh were out of control!!:burnout: Hehe!
 












As long as the Ranger is a 4X4 you shouldn't have any issues. My bro had a 2000 Ranger and it was great in the snow. Only issue he had was the engine size which was the 3.6 liter. I would get the 4.0 liter.
 












jsut throw some sand in the back....all the 2wd trucks around here..(all 3 of them) do that and they have no problems...other then the limitations of 2wd.
 






That shurtax is cool, but $120 is a lot for water in a bag.

A ranger with a 3.6?

I wondered abou that too, they had 2 6's and a 4 banger, but apparently the 4wd requires one of the 6's which is good.

Thanks for the help. I was thinking 4.0 and 5 speed stick.
 






I use snow tubes from Home Depot. They are about 60lbs each and costs about $4.00-$5.00 each. They have some salt in them so they will not freeze in the cold weather. If you get stuck you can just cut one open and thro the sand-salt mix under your wheels for traction.
 






Up here we get a decent amount of snow so I drive in it alot, the 92 X that we had went great but wasn't a whole lot better in 2wd than my old ranger. In 4X4 they both went great and I never had a problem with traction in either....except when I left the beaten path.... :D

A little weight in the back helps, but if it's not there I don't miss it but then again I like to play around and throw the rear end sideways anyhow... :thumbsup:
 






I've never been wholly convinced-- that adding weight was ever more than 50/50 proposition..

The weight you add will give you more traction to go-- but more weight to STOP.. M x v(squared). Increasing mass makes it harder to stop..

When the weather was absolutely at its nastiest, I'd put 150# BEHIND the rear axle-- essentially just inside the tailgate.

Again-- not going is bad.. Not stopping is WORSE...
 






I've never been wholly convinced-- that adding weight was ever more than 50/50 proposition..

The weight you add will give you more traction to go-- but more weight to STOP.. M x v(squared). Increasing mass makes it harder to stop..

When the weather was absolutely at its nastiest, I'd put 150# BEHIND the rear axle-- essentially just inside the tailgate.

Again-- not going is bad.. Not stopping is WORSE...
__________
I have owned many 2wd trucks and I could never get going in the snow without weight in the rear. Even with using snow tires.
 






4.0 SOHC with a 5 speed manual is a pretty nice combination. One of my friends had a 2003 4x4 ranger with that powertrain. It was quick, and yes, when it was in 2wd it was scary on slippery ground. In 4wd with no weight in the back, it would get around in the snow up steep hills well, but the back end still liked to go sideways- you just have to be careful.
 






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