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Front caliper pins.

239

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Can you remove and grease the front caliper pins without having to compress the caliper Pistons? I'm changing the front bearings tomorrow and I also want to grease the pins while I'm at it. I also have to use two brands of bearings unfortunately as usps lost my package that had the inner bearings. I'm using timken for the outer and the auto parts store brand for the inner. Will this be ok?
 



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swshawaii

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Always a good idea to clean and lube ALL the brake hardware and surfaces. Unless you're replacing the pads, compressing the pistons is not needed. Make sure to use the correct brake caliper grease, regular anti seize or chassis grease will turn gummy and bind. I suspect brake cleaner also damaged the boots. This was what happened the last time I had a "shop" do brake work. :mad:

9c105a60-b6c3-43b9-be8b-f521748ef321.jpg
9840b7ba-8b2c-475c-ad07-796f9e0d20b5.jpg
 






koda2000

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Yes. Use a high temp synthetic brake grease and blue Loctite on the threads to reinstall. Torque to 30-35 ft pounds. After unscrewing the bolt the rubber accordian part just pulls off.
 






239

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Always a good idea to clean and lube ALL the brake hardware and surfaces. Unless you're replacing the pads, compressing the pistons is not needed. Make sure to use the correct brake caliper grease, regular anti seize or chassis grease will turn gummy and bind. I suspect brake cleaner also damaged the boots. This was what happened the last time I had a "shop" do brake work. :mad:

9c105a60-b6c3-43b9-be8b-f521748ef321.jpg
9840b7ba-8b2c-475c-ad07-796f9e0d20b5.jpg

Ok thanks. Hopefully I don't have an issue with using two different brands of bearings. The outer bearings will be timken and the inner bearings will have to be the brand from advance auto. This is definitely the last time I use usps for shipping.
 






239

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Yes. Use a high temp synthetic brake grease and blue Loctite on the threads to reinstall. Torque to 30-35 ft pounds. After unscrewing the bolt the rubber accordian part just pulls off.

Cool. I got the brake pin grease so I'm good to go. I'll make sure I add some Loctite. Hopefully I don't have an issue with using two different brands of bearings.
 






SoNic67

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I always clean the pins and use synth brake lube. But... I never use locktite on my bolts and they never back out - if torqued at the right value!
Also, putting the pads back without compressing a little bit the cylinders might be tough.

PS: I did probably 100 brake jobs by now (my cars, my friends cars).
 






Flash

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Hopefully I don't have an issue with using two different brands of bearings.

You'll be ok. It's just a pity they aren't all Timken, good brand.

Why someone would recommend you DON"T use Loctite is beyond me.
If you've got it, use it. Don't panic if you don't have it, just torque the bolts up correctly.

What's the problem with compressing the caliper piston?
 






239

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You'll be ok. It's just a pity they aren't all Timken, good brand.

Why someone would recommend you DON"T use Loctite is beyond me.
If you've got it, use it. Don't panic if you don't have it, just torque the bolts up correctly.

What's the problem with compressing the caliper piston?

I don't have the tool to compress it and I heard that you have to open the bleeder valve when compressing the pistons. I'd rather avoid that if possible.
 






Flash

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I don't have the tool to compress it and I heard that you have to open the bleeder valve when compressing the pistons. I'd rather avoid that if possible.

Nah, just lever the pads back with a screwdriver.
You don't have to crack the bleeder, you can let the fluid displace into the reservoir, just don't let it overflow.
Or wrap a rag around the master cylinder reservoir to collect any spills.
 






239

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Nah, just lever the pads back with a screwdriver.
You don't have to crack the bleeder, you can let the fluid displace into the reservoir, just don't let it overflow.
Or wrap a rag around the master cylinder reservoir to collect any spills.

Ok. I'm looking at my Haynes manual but it doesn't really have a a clear picture of the caliper removal. I read that you just remove the two bolts that hold the bracket on, then the whole caliper comes off. Is this correct?
 






Flash

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Ok. I'm looking at my Haynes manual but it doesn't really have a a clear picture of the caliper removal. I read that you just remove the two bolts that hold the bracket on, then the whole caliper comes off. Is this correct?

Yes, but you'll have to spread the pads a bit for clearance.
 






swshawaii

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SoNic67

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I seldom open the valves. The brake fluid flushing can be done at any later time.
 






koda2000

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Once the two bolts are removed the caliper lifts right off. but you'll no doubt need to lever it off with a screw driver because the pads will be dragging.

Note: I use a large "C" clamp to push the pads back, just be careful after you reinstall the calipers, as it will take a couple pumps on the brake pedal before you have working brakes again (the pads have to move themselves back).

No harm with using blue Loctite on the pin's threads. Just a little extra insurance. I always use it.
 






koda2000

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Duplicate post - please ignore
 






239

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Once the two bolts are removed the caliper lifts right off. but you'll no doubt need to lever it off with a screw driver because the pads will be dragging.

Note: I use a large "C" clamp to push the pads back, just be careful after you reinstall the calipers, as it will take a couple pumps on the brake pedal before you have working brakes again (the pads have to move themselves back).

No harm with using blue Loctite on the pin's threads. Just a little extra insurance. I always use it.

Mine came right off for some reason. I'm getting the new races pressed in at the moment. The manual says to torque down to 17-25 ft lbs then back off and re torque to 1.6 ft lbs. my torque wrench doesn't go that low. Should I just leave it at 17 ft lbs?
Edit: For the retaining nut.
 






koda2000

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Mine came right off for some reason. I'm getting the new races pressed in at the moment. The manual says to torque down to 17-25 ft lbs then back off and re torque to 1.6 ft lbs. my torque wrench doesn't go that low. Should I just leave it at 17 ft lbs?
Edit: For the retaining nut.

The reason that you're supposed to first torque them to 17-25 FP and then back them off is to squeeze the grease out of the bearing/race surfaces, then re-torque the nut to a final 1.6 FP (just bearly snug).

The idea is that when the rotor/hub warm up, the bearings will expand slighly and then have just the right amount of preload on them. I usually torque them down to something around 20-25 FP as recommended, back the nut off and then just let the weight of the wrench dropped from about 1 o'clock to set the final pre-load. I've never had a problem doing it that way.

Leaving them at 17 FP is 10 x to tight.
 






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The reason that you're supposed to first torque them to 17-25 FP and then back them off is to squeeze the grease out of the bearing/race surfaces, then re-torque the nut to a final 1.6 FP (just bearly snug).

The idea is that when the rotor/hub warm up, the bearings will expand slighly and then have just the right amount of preload on them. I usually torque them down to something around 20-25 FP as recommended, back the nut off and then just let the weight of the wrench dropped from about 1 o'clock to set the final pre-load. I've never had a problem doing it that way.

Leaving them at 17 FP is 10 x to tight.

Yeah I backed them off as they seemed too tight. All the info I've gotten from this thread has really helped, thanks. Just one more question. I'm back home and I can't jack the vehicle up as I have a slanted driveway. I see that the rear pins are easily accessible without lifting the truck. Is it safe to remove on at a time to grease them if I engage the parking brake and chock the wheels?
 






koda2000

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Yeah I backed them off as they seemed too tight. All the info I've gotten from this thread has really helped, thanks. Just one more question. I'm back home and I can't jack the vehicle up as I have a slanted driveway. I see that the rear pins are easily accessible without lifting the truck. Is it safe to remove on at a time to grease them if I engage the parking brake and chock the wheels?

Not the way I'd do it, but I see no reason it wouldn't be safe to do it that way.
 



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Be careful with the front large caliper bolts, those must be very tight, and they should get a drop of red loctite on them. Those are common in threads on forums, for becoming loose, leading to no brakes, a locked up wheel etc. I've never had it happen, with or without loctite, but I have always gotten those bolts very tight(lugnut tight). Those are very strong and large grade eight bolts, you can't hurt them.

The sliding pins though do not always need re-greasing. I rarely ever disturb them, if the boots are untouched(don't loosen that bolt), then if the boot is sealed the pins/grease are as clean as the last time disturbed. Only under severe duty should you ever need to R&R the pin boots or grease.

I deliver mail, and I don't drive slow, or stop slowly. I know brakes, I do my own and I know what parts should be serviced, and which should be left alone and for how long.

Buy the best pads that you can, throw cheap stuff away, including lifetime parts store's "crap." I used to try those 20 years ago, and they came apart after 6-9000 miles usually.

Loctite is good, but only use one drop per bolt.

Compressing a caliper piston is needed, but for ABS vehicles, open the bleed screw if at all possible. ABS hydraulic units are very sensitive to dirty fluid, so pushing the worst fluid(in and near the caliper) is a bad idea. Bleed new fluid through the lines always, clean brake fluid is really good to have, old is very bad.

If you do plenty of brake work, invest $75 in a pressure bleeder system, easier to use and a one man job too. They also allow you do keep the MC from emptying(or you filling it constantly), by having a reservoir outside the MC filled and connected to the top of the MC(no air at all, back to the bleeder pump reservoir). Check them out, slick tool I love to have. They do need the proper reservoir cap adapter to work with each type of MC cap.
 






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