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Fuel Pump Replacement

Brock94

Well-Known Member
Joined
July 2, 2004
Messages
553
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4
City, State
Milford, CT
Year, Model & Trim Level
1994 XLT
I'm in the process of replacing a rusted brake line next to the fuel tank-- well that's fixed already, but when I dropped the tank to get to it, I noticed that the fuel line fittings are seriously rusted and at risk of breaking.

I'd like to replace the fuel pump assembly and have been reading a bunch of threads on here, but I could use some specific advice before I get started.

A few threads mention getting a replacement "retainer ring" and that the new pump from the dealer comes with one. From what I can see, my retainer ring is rusted beyond recognition, but I need to understand what I'll need to replace-- is there a metal ring bonded to the tank that the "retainer ring" locks into or does the ring just lock into the plastic tank? If there is a metal ring attached to the tank, can it be replaced? (If it's there, it's probably badly rusted.)

I'd really appreciate any pictures anyone has of the set-up or if you could just take the time to explain it.
 



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There is a lock nut that tightens down on the fuel pump itself. It is made of metal and it should have 4 tabs on the top to hit it with to loosen and tighten, but you have said it rusted beyond recognition. The fuel pump/sending unit is all one piece, though I have heard you can buy them seperately. My sending unit came with the rubber gasket, but not with a new locking nut. I had to purchase that seperately and replace. I replaced it just because I was already there and why not. I probaly still could have easily reused it 10 more times. It was in pretty good shape, even though it had some small oxidation on it. If I had a digital camera I would take pictures of the sending unit and the lock nut.

Are your saftey clips missing on your lines? If the metal piece on your tank is also rusted out, you may have to replace you entire tank. I am not sure if they can be rebuilt. how would the pump stay in place if the luck nut was gone.

I am not sure how much it would cost to replace your fuel lines.

d-1





Brock94 said:
I'm in the process of replacing a rusted brake line next to the fuel tank-- well that's fixed already, but when I dropped the tank to get to it, I noticed that the fuel line fittings are seriously rusted and at risk of breaking.

I'd like to replace the fuel pump assembly and have been reading a bunch of threads on here, but I could use some specific advice before I get started.

A few threads mention getting a replacement "retainer ring" and that the new pump from the dealer comes with one. From what I can see, my retainer ring is rusted beyond recognition, but I need to understand what I'll need to replace-- is there a metal ring bonded to the tank that the "retainer ring" locks into or does the ring just lock into the plastic tank? If there is a metal ring attached to the tank, can it be replaced? (If it's there, it's probably badly rusted.)

I'd really appreciate any pictures anyone has of the set-up or if you could just take the time to explain it.
 






The lock ring attaches to metal mounting flange which has been bonded to the plastic fuel tank during construction. The metal flange cannot be replaced so care must be used when removing the lock ring so as to not mangle it. Once you have a new fuel pump sending unit and lock ring it will be easier to visualize. I use a screw driver and hammer to tapp the lockring off (it rotates left/right). To lessen any fire damage I use a fan to blow away any stray fumes near the tank (helps keep me cool too!). When I removed my tank I drained all the gas and flushed it out several times to ensure it was squeaky clean.
 






OK-- I bought an aftermarket pump and ordered a new lock-ring from Autozone. I'll have to take a look at how it all works when I get the new lock ring today and decide if there's any chance I can get it back together if I venture to take it apart (b/c of all the rust). I really want to replace the sending unit because the metal fittings coming out if it are so rusted I'm worried that they'll start spraying gas soon. I definitely don't want to have to buy a new tank though if the lockring that's attached to the tank is bad. I'm not totally sure what to do.

I have a more immediate problem though-- I can't get the fuel lines disconnected. I read the thread about disconnecting the lines at the filter. I bought the plastic "disconnect tool" and I sprayed compressed air and WD-40 in the fittings to get dirt out and loosen any rust. The hose fitting slide back and forth a little and they look like they're in perfect condition, but I just can't seem to get them to disconnect using the tool. The tool slides all the way into the fitting and everything-- the fitting just won't come off. I messed with it for about an hour and a half last night.

Any special advice/techniques I should know about?
 






The fittings were the hardest part of replacing my fuel pump. One line came off easily, while the other fought me all the way. From my experience the problem occurred because I couldn't get the disconnect tool to contact each of the garter spring fingers. I would push the lines together (not apart), insert the tool and then try and separate the lines. If it didn't work then I would try again, but would rotate the tool slightly so that it would contact the fingers. I did this method 5 times before the easy line disconnected. The harder line never disconnected after playing with if for an hour +. I got so fed up that I inserted the tool and pulled Very hard on the sending unit and the lines disconnected. The one finger the tool didn't reach got bent which allowed the lines to come apart. I then used some needle nose plies to remove the garter spring, bend the mangled finger back into place and re-insert (easy easy easy). They stock garter springs at Napa autoparts in case you really mangle them.
 






Just wanted to say thanks and let you know that the x is back together and back on the road with a new rear brake line and new fuel pump.

While I was trying to disconnect the hoses from the fuel tank again, one of the steel lines coming out of the tank cracked and started spraying gas (I thought I had "depressurized" the system.) Anyway, that together with "brawns over brains" inspiration from DeRocha, I gave it a good yank and ripped the steel line off of the tank (it was really rusted-- my reason for replacing). A hack saw made quick work of the other line and then with pliers to pull on the "stubs" and the quick disconnect tool, I was able to get the hoses off.

The retainer ring was so rusted that it peeled off, but fortunately for me there was still enough left of the steel flange on the tank to attach the new pump with a new retainer ring.

So thanks for your help!
 






I just replaced my 91. I bought the fuel pump "MODULE"from a local store, it came with new lines(mine were also rusted). I had to cut the retaining ring off with a chisel(be careful...no sparks!!!) The module from the parts store did not have a ring. I stopped at the Ford dealer and they had one for 10.something, plus tax. Before you pull the module out of the tank (after you cut off the ring) clean the part of the retainer that is mounted to the tank so that you can get the new ring on. You do this before, so all the rust and crud won't go into the tank. Also, you will need a fuel line disconnect tool. You can get the cheap set at any auto parts outlet. HINT: spray the area where you have to slide the disconnect tool in. Then take a small screw driver and clean out the rust and crud from inside that area. Then blow it out with compressed air. I found that since you are replacing the lines and pump with a complete module, it is easier to break the rusted lines off the pump (on top of the tank) so you can get to them easier. Hope this helps
 






Glad to hear you've gotten everything fixed and back on the road :thumbsup: Unfortunately our vehicles have some serious time on them and living in the Rust Belt makes working on them many times more difficult.
 






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