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Help me identify some old tools

My Dad died recently, and my family is going through all his stuff in the basement and garage. He had a good amount of tools, mostly old stuff. He was 87 so he had a lot fetime to accumulate, and he was a machinist all his life. Plus he had some tools from his grandfather!
I'm 6000 miles away, and my sister is sending me pics of some of the tools to see what I want. Some I know what they are, some I have some general idea, and some I have no clue. So I will be posting pics to see if anyone can tell me what they are and what they are used for.
Here's the first one, some kind of hand drill, but it looks like it takes three hands? Must have some specialized purpose, but I can't tell from just this pic, any clues?

IMG_1158.jpg
 



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974X4BLACKSPORT

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I see:
A gear puller
hammers
"C" clamps
hand operated drill
wood planers
 






toypaseo

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Hand drill video



Something under the corner brace drill handles resembles a wood clamp kinda...
 






massacre

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Keep all that stuff! I end up using old stuff all the time. Plus it was your grandfather’s I still use some of my grandfather’s tools to this day. So cool to keep that stuff alive imho
 






Stic-o

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I have a bunch of my grandfather's old tools. He built House's here in the LA area. I just use them as decor mostly. But somethings I use. I have a old Makita miter saw that became my metal chop saw and few other things.

The cool part I got is all of my great grandfathers license plates from the 20's and 30's. They use to issue new plates every year then. :thumbsup:
 






CDW6212R

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Cool tools, I love the old classic good tools. I still have my grandfather's first Craftsman 1/2" ratchet. My uncle got his best tools, but I love this one ratchet. I've used it for over 25 years, and it makes a good hammer in a pinch. It's the old round thick head version, fine tooth and feels just right, versus the newer thin long, odd feeling stuff.
 






massacre

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Cool tools, I love the old classic good tools. I still have my grandfather's first Craftsman 1/2" ratchet. My uncle got his best tools, but I love this one ratchet. I've used it for over 25 years, and it makes a good hammer in a pinch. It's the old round thick head version, fine tooth and feels just right, versus the newer thin long, odd feeling stuff.

I have a Blue Point hacksaw that was my grandfathers and it is the nicest one I ever used. People often comment on it.
 






Mbrooks420

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The few favorite tools I have I got from my grandfather and dad, including my “lucky” breaker bar.
 






BrooklynBay

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I have a lot of old tools from my grandfather. I remember when he used these tools when I was a kid. Everything was solid metal back then, and felt heavy. The stuff they make today is plastic with a rubber grip.
 






RangerX

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toypaseo for the win on the first pic! Thank you!

Here's the second tool, I'm thinking this one will be tougher.

IMG_1161.jpg
 






Mbrooks420

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Vintage OD/ID dial indicator. I’d be very surprised if it wasn’t still entirely serviceable. Starret is very solid, and that’s surely made in the USA.

I had a slightly more modern version that another employee ruined by crashing a turret into it. SUPER salty.
 






RangerX

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Wow, I never would have guessed that! I see no calipers, or does it somehow work differently?
 






Mbrooks420

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It’s used on a machine to check runout most of the time. IE You chuck a part in a lathe and this tells how true you have it chucked. There should be a lever that flexes up and down.
 






toypaseo

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Any of those vintage tools would pry be better than today's cheepo disposable toys they call tools.

I also got some hand-me-down tools from my Dad, who was in the National Guard. Lots of old school brands, some Japanese ones, SK, Armstrong, PROTO, Bonney, and others.
 






RangerX

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A few more.

IMG_1165.jpg
 






RangerX

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And these. Some kind of machinist test blocks maybe?

IMG_1164.jpg
 






Mbrooks420

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In the second picture the blocks with the holes in them are machined parallel bars. (As are the smaller machined bars) They will be matched sets with very tight tolerances on height, length, and width.

The 90 degree angles are used to fixture, or hold objects when machining.

The metal Vee shaped thing is a V Block. It’s a tight 90 degree angle. It’s used to put something round in, and spin. It should be highly polished and very hard so neither piece gets scored. You can then use an indicator to tell how round (or out of round) something is.

I’m not sure of the names of the items in the first picture (I don’t recognize the thing on the left at all) so I’ll leave those up to someone with accurate knowledge.
 






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tools1.jpg


1 - Hand Vise. Predecessor to Vise Grips in many respects. It does pretty much exactly what it looks like it does. It holds things tightly and precisely together for filing, drilling, assembly, etc.

2- Tri-Square protractor. A combination square set consists of a heavy duty scale (ruler) with a groove down the middle. A square head (for determining right angles); a center finder head; and a protractor head (for determining any angle). On the far side of the knurled knob, there is often a level bubble.

3 - Trammel points. Portable compass, basically. Insert a board or a beam, clamp down, and now you gotcha a compass of whatever size you want. Used in everything from layout work to tire alignment.


tools2.jpg


4 - 1,2,3 blocks. Yes, that's the name. 1,2,3 Blocks. This because of their entirely predictable dimensions of 1inch X 2inch X 3inch. Very handy. Precision tool. Depending on precision, used for layout, checking, and verification, or, if not quite as precise, used to clamp workpiece on a machine. You have a set of 4, which is very good.

5 - Right angle blocks. Generic knee blocks used for a plethora of chores including clamping a workpiece to a machine for drilling, milling, even turning.

6- V-blocks. These are often accompanied by a specific kind of arch clamp (which you might have) that holds round stock in place. Most often used for drilling. Setup the drill exactly on center with the groove, then whatever size round stock you place in there will be centered for drilling.

7 - Parallels. These come in pairs. No specific sizes other than "the same as the other one". Used for lots of holding and spacing needs when something (usually a workpiece) needs to be moved up just a bit.

You live in Hawaii AND you have machinist tools? I'm jealous.
 






RangerX

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Thanks biggun, good info, and no, I don't have these tools, they are all in Massachusetts. My sister is sending me pics of what she's finding. I will have her ship me the stuff I end up wanting.
 



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Wow, I never would have guessed that! I see no calipers, or does it somehow work differently?
Okay, I couldn't let this one go by, sorry.

This is a Starrett (top shelf brand) Last Word. It belongs to a very large family of tools called 'dial indicators' and is used to measure *displacement*. That's all it does. Which doesn't sound like much but it's simply invaluable in a shop environment.

To the left, you'll see a tiny little pear-shaped probe. When that probe moves, the needle moves. Easy. The face is calibrated to show (more or less) 0.001" increments. One-one thousandth of an inch. So you can wiggle the probe (gently) and see the needle move.

It's often used to check "runout" or how concentric a shaft or hole might be. Chuck a round piece and see if it's turning true. OR chuck up the gauge shaft and see if the spindle is exactly over the center of a hole.
In precision setups, it's used to slide across a flat surface to verify both flatness and parallelism.
Thousands of uses.

Like many of these machine shop tools, they're not especially useful all by themselves without some basic shop infrastructure, like a lathe, mill, drill, inspection table, etc.

OR, you can put it on ebay and get an obscene amount of money (well over $100) for it. From the looks of that one, he probably bit the bullet and paid upwards of $12 when it was new.
 






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