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Help needed with lifting my 2000 Ford Explorer AWD

Oldtimer2000

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City, State
Charleston SC
Year, Model & Trim Level
00 Explorer Eddie Bauer
I have a 2000 Ford Explorer Eddie Bauer 5.0 AWD and I want to put 33’s or 35’s on it. I have not been able to find suspension or body lifts for it. Any suggestions would be great.

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I believe the body lift you want is the PA882 or PA883 by performance accessories.
 






A Ford Ranger has the same front end, problem is, the rear of the Explorer is set-up as axle under the springs and the Ranger is axle over. What you get in a kit for a Ranger is not going to work in the rear. One can do a spring over and get 4-5" i hte rear.

How are you going to use it and how much lift do you want?
 






Hello, I have an 01 Mountaineer 5.0 awd and came across the same issue. I have 31s, no lift, minor trimming was needed. I daily drive mine (expressway mostly) and two track/camp/kayak. I want nothing over 4 inches in a lift. No bigger than 35s when done. I have searched for hours and came up more confused then I was at the beginning of my searching. 😖 photos show part of the trimmed bumper. Eventually I’d like a brush guard.
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A Ford Ranger has the same front end, problem is, the rear of the Explorer is set-up as axle under the springs and the Ranger is axle over. What you get in a kit for a Ranger is not going to work in the rear. One can do a spring over and get 4-5" i hte rear.

How are you going to use it and how much lift do you want?
Can you dumb it down more for me? I get the rear won’t work, so what do I buy that’ll work but not break my bank? And as I’m searching do I just use “Ranger” as my vehicle (I have an 01 5.0 awd mountaineer)? And I see tons of different “lifts” but what’s true and what’s not?

to the original poster: I feel your pain. I just want a lift and some 35s 🤣 I get confused easily when I’m going into unfamiliar grounds (always had lifted vehicles but put on prior to myself owning, never put one on/ordered one myself)... didn’t mean to jack your post. I saw we had dang near the same issue same vehicle. Good luck on your search!
 






Aren't the body lift kits(thicker body mounts) reasonable. I would ask one of the regular great members about how they would do it, they have seen and/or done it all.
 






I wouldn’t go over 32s or 33s without regearing.
 






I have a 2000 Ford Explorer Eddie Bauer 5.0 AWD and I want to put 33’s or 35’s on it. I have not been able to find suspension or body lifts for it. Any suggestions would be great.
I came across this, got 3 opinions on it. All 3 said yes that’s what you’ll need for an 01 mountaineer awd 5.0, I’m sticking with 31s. Dd and trails (nothing major).
Experts wanna tap in on this before I hit click it’s mine....

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That will go onto your Mountaineer. That's the basic thing most people do with their 2nd gen Explorers.

BTW, note that the springs on the Mountaineers are not the stiffest Ford installed, those came on 4WD Explorers. The Mountaineer got the softest springs, front and rear. So you will likely want stiffer springs if you have some bottoming out in the back regularly. Any will swap from other Explorers(not the 2dr Sport models), if hunting just remember the 4WD models got stiffer springs in general.
 






Before buying that kit try and adjust your t bars as is. You might be able to get a few inches out of it as is.
 






You can usually get 2" with a torsion bar twist and rear shackles. The torsion bar keys in the picture you posted are made to allow more twist which equals more lift, but often you can get what you want without those................................I prefer a suspension lift like this to a body lift. Anything over 2" lift and you need a body lift with the above or a kit for the front suspension. and some welding to go axle over in the rear.
 






I wouldn’t bother going spring over in the rear, I’d get a leaf pack made with more arch. The stock ones aren’t that good, and have almost certainly flattened out considerably by now.
 






I wouldn’t bother going spring over in the rear, I’d get a leaf pack made with more arch. The stock ones aren’t that good, and have almost certainly flattened out considerably by now.
That will work, but a spring over and adding a leaf from the wrecking yard is going to be less expensive than buying leaf packs..............and then I currently use air shocks to add a bit of adjustable spring and a bit of height.

I don't need or want all the lift of a spring over or front kit. I am running a torsion twist, shackles and air shocks with 32's on stock rims with 1.5" spacers.
 






A Ford Ranger has the same front end, problem is, the rear of the Explorer is set-up as axle under the springs and the Ranger is axle over. What you get in a kit for a Ranger is not going to work in the rear. One can do a spring over and get 4-5" i hte rear.

How are you going to use it and how much lift do you want?
That will work, but a spring over and adding a leaf from the wrecking yard is going to be less expensive than buying leaf packs..............and then I currently use air shocks to add a bit of adjustable spring and a bit of height.

I don't need or want all the lift of a spring over or front kit. I am running a torsion twist, shackles and air shocks with 32's on stock rims with 1.5" spacers.
Rough country makes a kit for the Ford Rangers that will fit but you'll have to do an axle flip kit on the rear which you can buy from 4-wheel parts
 






I wouldn’t bother going spring over in the rear, I’d get a leaf pack made with more arch. The stock ones aren’t that good, and have almost certainly flattened out considerably by now.
Agree with the view. The springs do not just sit under the vehicle. They control the axle. Putting a lift on weak springs and larger tires is a recipe for other issues. If the cost of the parts might be an issue, what about all of the other issues that come along with these type of modifications?

Questions:

How much lift can you do before driveline angles/dimensions are too far out?

Length of steering shaft/capacity of steering rack?

How much will the modification change in your forward/aft (accelerate/brake) and side to side roll and sway?

What size tires require reprogramming for speedometer?

Brake system lines, capacity, stopping distance, etc?

Power availability, reliability/longevity, and fuel economy concerns?

Bumper/lighting laws?

What states legal/illegal?

And the list can continue...
 






...The Mountaineer got the softest springs, front and rear...
My '98 Mountaineer came with 1's in the front which, if the research I have done on this site is correct, is the stiffest available. The rears are F's, not sure how that measures up.
 






My '98 Mountaineer came with 1's in the front which, if the research I have done on this site is correct, is the stiffest available. The rears are F's, not sure how that measures up.
Those fronts are stiff, I'd say they had been changed. I forgot what the front in mine were, but I chose "B" springs which are somewhat stiff. I didn't know then that the Mountaineer didn't get springs as stiff as 4WD Explorers. I learned that later and that explained why mine always bottomed out in the rear with any load or a hard dip in the road. I have the EE lowering kit on the truck though, 2 3/8" blocks went in the back
 












Agree with the view. The springs do not just sit under the vehicle. They control the axle. Putting a lift on weak springs and larger tires is a recipe for other issues. If the cost of the parts might be an issue, what about all of the other issues that come along with these type of modifications?

Questions:

How much lift can you do before driveline angles/dimensions are too far out?

Length of steering shaft/capacity of steering rack?

How much will the modification change in your forward/aft (accelerate/brake) and side to side roll and sway?

What size tires require reprogramming for speedometer?

Brake system lines, capacity, stopping distance, etc?

Power availability, reliability/longevity, and fuel economy concerns?

Bumper/lighting laws?

What states legal/illegal?

And the list can continue...
Good lord, these have been around for 20 years and the basic and safe ways of lifting them have been around since shortly after they came out. Many vehicles run with the axle over the springs and these can be made to do so relatively easy and safely. I don't see most folks wanting that much lift though.
 



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Good lord, these have been around for 20 years and the basic and safe ways of lifting them have been around since shortly after they came out. Many vehicles run with the axle over the springs and these can be made to do so relatively easy and safely. I don't see most folks wanting that much lift though.
Not knocking on the idea. I am just making sure that the OP has a clue about throwing large, off-road tires can end up extremely expensive. If it is a daily driver, understanding that it may need to be relegated to a part-time or off road only vehicle. I have never tried to shove 35" tires on a light duty, daily driven SUV. I removed 33" tires from a full-size truck as they are too big and slosh around in the dips in the roadway. Safety Is always the first question. Can it be done is not the question. As I was told may times while I was growing up "It's only metal". Here is a link to read as it is not my opinion that matters:


If he is still wanting to do it after the caution; then, specifically pointed thoughts can assist.

My first would be to reccomend that his first step is not a suspension lift. I would say to plan a body lift. A body lift can make some components easier to get to and can be done with relative safety. Possibly, enough room for headers? Possibly, new, longer brake lines and rerouting of front wheel speed sensor wires. Rerouting of wiring from under driver's seat to frame to gain length. Likely, it will require some assistance; but, it will have minimal negative effect on drivability. It will, also, increase the clearance for the wheel wells without any body modification. Any suspension mod affects a vehicle's handling. And, yes, this would effect the vehicle roll cg. An additional note is the reminder that it has an independent front suspension that is not ideal for mods (cradle is welded into frame). The body lift would reduce the amount of suspension lift required for the 35" tires.

Ideally, you split the difference between a body lift and suspension.

Suspension: Yes, the "axle flip" is capable of raising the rear of the vehicle. But, a special purpose spring set is safer than trying to reuse old, worn springs and can be installed without welding or otherwise messing around with the spring perches. Note: "flipping an axle" is bad English. It is not what it implies. What is it? You dismount the rear axle. You weld new spring perches on the opposite side of the axle tube (fractions of a degree of axle housing rotation matter) and remove the old perches. If you flipped the axle, it would literally be upside down and shortly it would leak out all over the place and the gears, without proper lubrication, would quickly fail. The cost of having a shop do this will almost always cost more than the springs. It is usually done when there is no easier, cheaper method and/or it is needed to achieve the desired lift. I do not reccomend this to anyone who intends to do this on their own with no prior experience. It is not about how hard to do as much as how likely it is to be done right. A good shop will always do this in a fixture. The fixture allows the user to accurately place and weld the perches to align the axle side to side as well as in rotation to align the hog head for proper driveline alignment. The fixture is not cheap; but, the results are worth every cent.

Shocks need to be replaced with suitable length and heavier duty shocks. Heavier tires require more effort to control.

I would reccomend looking into a watts linkage for the rear to help with the lower spring stability. The best place for this is on top of the hog head. This prevents it from being a ground clearance issue and applies the suspension stresses in the most even manner. A rear mounted one has some of the clearance issues like a panhard bar.


Anti-roll bars and links need to be looked at to insure that the bars remain parallel to the ground for proper performance.

A regear is probably mandatory. A lot of the guys that mod these are using manual transmissions and upgrade to full-size transfer cases. Transfer case torque capacity? The factory unit is known to fail under normal conditions. Speedometer fix? The input is required for automatic transmissions and a bunch of other things to function. The factory one is an input sensor in the rear axle that, on the Explorer, is converted in 4WABS (ABS module).

A in-depth brake mod is needed as the larger tires provide more torque on the brakes and at a minimum will reduce brake life.

The larger diameter would, also, make it necessary to check the limits on the light-duty, 5 lug, pattern. (I learned, $1k to get fixed, that a 6-lug, 5200lb Dexter trailer axle will shear the lugs off at 45mph courtesy of Louisiana/I-10/June 2018.)

Need to add, at a minimum, an additional inch of wheel well clearance for every additional 2 inches of wheel diameter for wheel articulation. Fender flare mod if wheels are not fully under fenders. 35" tires would be approximately 6.12" bigger in diameter. This would be a need for at least 3" in additional clearance around the tires front and rear (mostly up and down). The front tires would be limited in their travel in a turn and are pretty much guaranteed to scrub on something. ?? Trial and error to find out how much and where.

Suggest that the OP or anyone planning to mod their vehicle copy this thread and look around and find every variable that they need to account for in accomplishing. It would be really nice for them to post the list and their solutions for the problems in an organized manner. Because, then we all can learn.
 






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