Lowering my truck - 99 Mounty 5.0 | Ford Explorer Forums - Serious Explorations

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Lowering my truck - 99 Mounty 5.0

358R

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City, State
Clemson/Aiken, SC
Year, Model & Trim Level
99 Mounty 5.0
I think this is the right place to post this...if not, you can crucify me later and move the post as you see fit.

I've read all the necessary articles about lowering my truck. I'm decently savvy with mods, but this one makes me nervous and I don't exactly have the space or tools to do it. I've already talked to 4 different shops that are supposedly the best in the area and can do anything to anything....but no one wants to touch it and/or take my money because of the "safety" issue with doing this.

That being said, would someone that's somewhat close to me be willing to do it for me? I will pay. I'm in 29829 during the week and 29631 during the weekends. Either reply here or PM me and let me know. Having spoken with the shops, I've got an idea of what it should cost.

Thanks
 



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It's RWD, right...?
 






How are you wanting to lower it, and what are the shops' safety concerns?
 






It's RWD, right...?
Yes

How are you wanting to lower it, and what are the shops' safety concerns?
The torsion twist method. They didn't really specify other than saying that it was dangerous and that it might try and flip back or something. And that was the farthest I got in the conversation with any shop.
 






The fact that the torsion twist is such a mystery still 21 years after the first Explorer with torsion bars was offered (and with a million threads on this site about it) is crazy to me. The adjuster bolt is just one additional factor in aligning the front end, that's all. I don't see how that would be a safety issue and can't believe 4 shops said it was. And if you're "decently savvy" then why can't you just do it yourself? All it requires is a jack stand, 13mm socket, and maybe a breaker bar.
 






And if you're "decently savvy" then why can't you just do it yourself? All it requires is a jack stand, 13mm socket, and maybe a breaker bar.

I guess because of the amount of force behind it and the fact that it might cause harm.
 












Adjust the torsion keys for the height you want(given camber washers in it too), about 2-3" max down., and leveled at the LCA bushings. Measure it before you start, setting on level ground, from the front bushing down to the floor. Adjust until you get those equal left/right, and the height you want.

You can lower it without a jack, it's minor pressure to loosen the bolt. To raise it the tires need to be off of the ground. One side will likely not go far enough down, the bolt might come out if you shoot for a much lowered height. You can thread it back in if it comes out, no problem.
 






^ Ditto above. Only parts required are camber kits, lowering blocks, an u-bolts. If loosening or removing the bolts doesn't lower enough, doing a torsion adjuster (key) flip or drop keys are available. Most expensive parts are two camber kits and alignment.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/KEY-FR-07-F...ash=item41ac887dde:g:buIAAOSwQItTzo2D&vxp=mtr

Also check front and rear bump stop clearance. All the info you need. (36 Pages)
Seriously Lowered Explorer - Ranger Suspension Tec | Ford Explorer and Ford Ranger Forums - Serious Explorations
 






Don, eBay drop key link in post #9. :thumbsup:

Cheap, used to cost $150 pair from Airbagit/Chassis Tech/ AIM Industries. (Same company)
 






Don, eBay drop key link in post #9. :thumbsup:

Cheap, used to cost $150 pair from Airbagit/Chassis Tech/ AIM Industries. (Same company)

Thanks, I was sure someone would still make a version. I think mine were about $90 in 2005ish, from a Total Performance company.
 






Ok, so just loosen the bolts and get the camber adjusters and done? And do I understand correctly that these bolts are the "keys"?
 






The keys you can see in the link on eBay, they all look the same except the clocking of the hex angle hole. The torsion bar is in/through the key, they cannot come apart. The adjustment bolts simply pushes up on the key, which "tightens" the bar, applies more pressure to it, moves the wheels down etc. As you release pressure by turning the bolt out, that lowers the wheel on that one side.

Here are three good pictures that show how the parts fit together.

Torsionbars,LCA.JPG


Torsionbar key01.JPG


Torsionbar key02.JPG
 






The keys you can see in the link on eBay, they all look the same except the clocking of the hex angle hole. The torsion bar is in/through the key, they cannot come apart. The adjustment bolts simply pushes up on the key, which "tightens" the bar, applies more pressure to it, moves the wheels down etc. As you release pressure by turning the bolt out, that lowers the wheel on that one side.

Here are three good pictures that show how the parts fit together.

View attachment 92679

View attachment 92680

View attachment 92681

Now I understand. I'll try cranking the bolts first and see where that gets me.

Thanks all.
 






If it hasn't been mentioned before, you need to know that altering that ride height alters the front end alignment of that side. Once you begin adjusting the height, the tire wear will be poorer, from a different camber amount. That's what the camber washers are to help with, they allow a little bit more camber adjustment by the alignment shop.
 






If it hasn't been mentioned before, you need to know that altering that ride height alters the front end alignment of that side. Once you begin adjusting the height, the tire wear will be poorer, from a different camber amount. That's what the camber washers are to help with, they allow a little bit more camber adjustment by the alignment shop.

Yea, I read that one. Thanks though.
 






Good good, tires are a lot more expensive these days. It's not the same as way back when a $40 new tire was a big deal, to wear out a used pair. Now a low end tire is $100, and $150 is not the high end.
 






Good good, tires are a lot more expensive these days. It's not the same as way back when a $40 new tire was a big deal, to wear out a used pair. Now a low end tire is $100, and $150 is not the high end.

Yea, for sure. I bought firestones this last time round (cause I work for them and have that hookup). Lucky me.
 






I also meant to ask if there were any issues with the bolts coming out/loose after lowering it or needing to keep a check on them? Or do they pretty much stay in place?
 



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The adjustment bolts need to have a couple of threads still in the block which they thread into. They should stay in place unless they are not in enough. You can buy shorter bolts, but those have a unique rounded top end. That's part of why I bought the lowering keys the second time I worked on mine(rebuilt the whole suspension etc). The new lowering keys allowed the bolts to go much farther into the blocks similar to stock. If those are only $32 or so, and a decent quality, I'd definitely get those. I'll be buying another pair of those, for my "new" 98 truck I got this year.
 






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