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More problems after 0012m upper/lower manafold gasket, Tentioner kit fix

Housing & spacer applies the tension

Dale,

With the present way you have done it. The piston will depress all the way to the socket with 20 in lb's of torque....Right?

So if it was a solid bolt it would still be torqued to that value?


Cliff

That's correct. As the tensioner is screwed in the piston is forced completely into the housing. The housing then presses against the spacer that pushes against the guide.
 



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And the Jinx continues!

Well I continued my little project of realigning the right camshaft.

I set it for TDC and checked the left camshaft slot. It looks like 1.5 inches from head to center line is close.

ftp://cj136.gotdns.com/files2/Explorer/Headace/CAM/DSCN8425.JPG

ftp://cj136.gotdns.com/files2/Explorer/Headace/CAM/DSCN8428.JPG


I Loosened the cam bolt while my son held the breaker bar on the crankshaft. It loosened at around 60 ft pounds. I then loosened the cam bearing caps and attached my vise gripe pliers behind the #2 cap.

ftp://cj136.gotdns.com/files2/Explorer/Headace/CAM/DSCN8430.JPG


And then preceded to turn the cam back to 0 degrees the. There was resistance against the lifters until close to zero. I found that an old gutter nail was a good fit in the slot.'''LOL....about .230. Then I measured for equal distance between both sides.

ftp://cj136.gotdns.com/files2/Explorer/Headace/CAM/DSCN8435.JPG



Next I started to tighten the bearing caps with each one having the medicine bottle strips under them to hold the Camshaft from turning when I tighten them. I turned each a little at a time.



THEN DISASTER STRIKES...... AGAIN!!!!!





I'm tightening the #1 bearing cap and I hear click. At first I thought it was the socket wrench had slipped. I went to tighten the other bolt. It was loose, then I see the bearing is cracked in half.........Expletive....OUT LOUD!

ftp://cj136.gotdns.com/files2/Explorer/Headace/CAM/DSCN8437.JPG

ftp://cj136.gotdns.com/files2/Explorer/Headace/CAM/DSCN8438.JPG

ftp://cj136.gotdns.com/files2/Explorer/Headace/CAM/DSCN8439.JPG

I was very care to tighten a little at a time and to make sure all the cap was going down squarely!


I told you this vehicle is JINXED!



What Next?



Now I'm not sure if the other bearing caps started to fracture? Can I get them magnafluxed cheap?



Now how do I get replacement caps? Should I go to the junk yard or should I order a set from the stealership?


Forget the dealer...they want me to buy a new head....yeah right!


Cliff
 






That' terrible!

I'm sorry that you're having such a string of bad luck!

I'm very surprised that your cap failed.

Is the plastic strip thicker than 1/16 inch? It shouldn't be.

Is the plastic strip wider than 1/2 inch? It shouldn't be wider than the camshaft journal/bearing. One of the bearings is a thrust bearing that keeps the camshaft from moving to the rear or front. If the plastic strip is wider than the camshaft journal it will bind against the sides of the thrust bearing.

Did you torque the bearing cap bolts to 35 in-lbs or ft-lbs? If you torqued to ft-lbs then you applied 12 times as much force.

I would try calling the local salvage yard to see if they have a cracked head that you can get a bearing cap from. If you can't get one from a salvage yard then call an auto machine shop that does head work. The caps should be the same for Explorers, Mountaineers, Rangers and Mustangs with the SOHC engine. Make sure you get one that is not the thrust bearing. I believe the thrust bearing is the one next to the sprocket but I'm not sure.

Magnafluxing will probably cost as much as an entire set of caps would cost from the salvage yard.

There's a saying that bad news comes in threes. You have had your three so maybe it will be smooth going from now on.
 






I'm sorry that you're having such a string of bad luck!

I'm very surprised that your cap failed.

Is the plastic strip thicker than 1/16 inch? It shouldn't be.

Is the plastic strip wider than 1/2 inch? It shouldn't be wider than the camshaft journal/bearing. One of the bearings is a thrust bearing that keeps the camshaft from moving to the rear or front. If the plastic strip is wider than the camshaft journal it will bind against the sides of the thrust bearing.

Did you torque the bearing cap bolts to 35 in-lbs or ft-lbs? If you torqued to ft-lbs then you applied 12 times as much force.

I would try calling the local salvage yard to see if they have a cracked head that you can get a bearing cap from. If you can't get one from a salvage yard then call an auto machine shop that does head work. The caps should be the same for Explorers, Mountaineers, Rangers and Mustangs with the SOHC engine. Make sure you get one that is not the thrust bearing. I believe the thrust bearing is the one next to the sprocket but I'm not sure.

Magnafluxing will probably cost as much as an entire set of caps would cost from the salvage yard.

There's a saying that bad news comes in threes. You have had your three so maybe it will be smooth going from now on.

Thanks Dale,


I just don't know what's next.

I have to much money and time in this vehicle to quit on it. I just don't have the money at this time to do it any other way.

Did you notice that these are cast caps. I was surprised to see the grain.

The thickness of the medicine bottle material is .030 and the width and length was just right.

ftp://cj136.gotdns.com/files/Explorer/Headace/CAM/DSCN8437.JPG


The only thing I can think of is that the camshaft must not of been level front to back. I snugged all the bolts first. Then starting from the middle on out tightened the caps one at a time. I Did notice that the cap that cracked, the bolt was tighter then the others. I have loosened the other caps and noticed how much the cam was lifting as I loosened! The cam may not have been level to the bottom half standoff's. So that may be why the front cap was tighter as the back ones were snugged.

I wasn't even torquing to 35 in/lb's yet!

I used the beam style 3/8 in/lb and even on that the in/lb's are in increments of 50, so I had to estimate.

ftp://cj136.gotdns.com/files/Explorer/Headace/CAM/DSCN8442.JPG

I'm going tomorrow to check the local engine machine shop to talk to one of the workers. I hope he can get me a cap....CHEAP.


Cliff
 






Smaller strips?

I just can't believe that your cap broke. Your torque wrench ranges from 0 to 800 in-lbs. Did you torque to the value identified by the red arrow in the photo below?
DSCN8442.JPG


Also, did you make sure that the length of the plastic strip is shorter (as well as narrower) than the exposed journal? When the plastic strip is layed on the camshaft journal there should be a gap at the bottom of the strip as shown in the photo below.
gap.jpg

If there is no gap then there's no room for the plastic to expand to when it is compressed.

I noticed in the side angle photo of your broken cap that there is small smooth area in the break indicating a defective casting. Only about 3/4ths of the two halves were actually attached.
 






I just can't believe that your cap broke. Your torque wrench ranges from 0 to 800 in-lbs. Did you torque to the value identified by the red arrow in the photo below?
View attachment 58871

Yes I did.....:)

Also, did you make sure that the length of the plastic strip is shorter (as well as narrower) than the exposed journal? When the plastic strip is layed on the camshaft journal there should be a gap at the bottom of the strip as shown in the photo below.
View attachment 58872
If there is no gap then there's no room for the plastic to expand to when it is compressed.

I measured the strip. From end to end it's 1/16" less the circumference. So IF it's in the middle there would be 1/32" clearance but It could easily be squeezed to one side!

I noticed in the side angle photo of your broken cap that there is small smooth area in the break indicating a defective casting. Only about 3/4ths of the two halves were actually attached.

Here's some close up's:

ftp://cj136.gotdns.com/files/Explorer/Headace/CAM/DSCN8449.JPG

ftp://cj136.gotdns.com/files/Explorer/Headace/CAM/DSCN8448.JPG


Could you point out the area? That may explain why it snapped!

What program are you using to put colored arrows in?


Cliff
 






Not much room to get in there!

At this point, the crankshaft should be exactly at TDC, you have confirmed the left/driver camshaft slot is correct, the right/passenger camshaft sprocket retaining bolt is loose, the right/passenger camshaft slot is correct, and the camshaft bearing cap bolts have been torqued to 25 in-lbs.

Now comes the difficult task which I have not performed with the engine in the vehicle. Insert the tensioner spacer as shown below.
View attachment 58832
You will have to somehow position the spacer so it stays in place by itself. Then you will need a shallow 27mm (or you're using a 1 1/16in) socket since you probably can't get your hands in a position to push directly on the tensioner and rotate it at the same time. If you had an ordinary bolt the same diameter and thread as the tensioner this job would be easy. You wouldn't need the spacer and you wouldn't be fighting the tensioner spring. I didn't have one available and since my engine was out I could start the threads with just my hands. Anyway, you have to compress the tensioner spring against the spacer enough that you can start the tensioner threads in the hole. You must be careful not to cross thread or damage the threads. If after a few attempts, you have no success and are concerned that you might damage the threads then I strongly suggest that you obtain a bolt with the same threads as the tensioner. It would be better to wait until you find a bolt then to damage the threads in the head.

When you have successfully inserted the tensioner/spacer or bolt then torque it to no more than 20 in-lbs. This will be enough to keep the camshaft sprocket from rotating but not so much to damage the guide assembly.


There just isn't much room to get in there with the socket extension.

We still have the leftover front one. There is a chance to do as you suggested to drill out the piston hole and screw in a bolt or remove the piston and install a stove bolt through the other end.

Do you want to give it a try?



Cliff
 






My mistake

Here's some close up's:

Could you point out the area? That may explain why it snapped!

What program are you using to put colored arrows in?


Cliff

My mistake. I was looking at the normal depression in the top of the cap that begins the trough for the cap bolt.

I use Paint to draw the arrows.
 






Yeah, Paint is a quick way to do it....
 






Eliminating the spring

There just isn't much room to get in there with the socket extension.

We still have the leftover front one. There is a chance to do as you suggested to drill out the piston hole and screw in a bolt or remove the piston and install a stove bolt through the other end.

Do you want to give it a try?

Cliff

First of all, I don't see how the precision tensioner that is part of the timing tool kit can work properly since the distance to the guide in the front is longer than in the rear. I'm glad I didn't purchase the tool kit. When the rear tensioner is torqued the piston is almost completely retracted into the housing. When the front tensioner is torqued a large part of the piston remains exposed. Of course it only matters when there is no or little oil pressure. When there's oil pressure the front piston will exert the same force on the guide as done by the rear piston.

I have a tendency to save everything so I'm hesitant to destroy one of the old tensioners. But since I got my new rear one on eBay for $5 I guess I'll probably modify my old rear tensioner to use as a timing tool.

It's up to you if you want to modify your old front tensioner. I don't know how difficult it will be to remove the old piston. There's no internal circlip to release the piston. I'm guessing that there is a tapered ridge on the piston and a square ridge on the housing and the piston is simply driven in past the ridge. You could hold the piston from rotating with visegrips and drill a hole in the center using the oil pressure relief hole as the center point for the drill. Then you could drill a hole in the outside end of the tensioner housing. Get a stove bolt 1.5 inches longer than the length of the housing and a washer that will fit thru the head hole but larger than the piston diameter. Screw a nut on the stove bolt to about 3/4 inch from the bolt head. Then place the washer on the bolt next to the nut. Stick the bolt with washer and nut thru the piston toward the other end of the housing. Compress the piston into the housing with the stove bolt sticking out the other end. Screw another nut onto the stove bolt and tighten until the piston is fully retracted and the washer is tight against the housing. Adjust the stove bolt projection until it is the right length and further tighten the outside nut. You may have to cut off some of the exposed bolt to get your socket to the head of the tensioner.
 












When the rear tensioner is torqued the piston is almost completely retracted into the housing.
When the front tensioner is torqued a large part of the piston remains exposed.
Of course it only matters when there is no or little oil pressure. When there's oil pressure the front piston will exert the same force on the guide as done by the rear piston.

If the piston does not go all the way in with the front tensioner used as the rear tensioner then this may work.
DSCN8412.JPG

When the surfaces are cleaned of oil with acetone and the tape used, it has a lot of tensile strength when pushed against. I bet even more then 20 in/lb's of force to strip the gripe.

I'm looking in to all options....


Cliff
 






use a magnet

If the piston does not go all the way in with the front tensioner used as the rear tensioner then this may work.
DSCN8412.JPG

When the surfaces are cleaned of oil with acetone and the tape used, it has a lot of tensile strength when pushed against. I bet even more then 20 in/lb's of force to strip the gripe.

I'm looking in to all options....

Cliff

If the socket drops into the head you may have to pull the head to retrieve it. The head bolts are expensive and not reuseable. I would be afraid to try it. If you decide to risk it, I suggest that you have a magnet strong enough to hold the weight of the socket and keep the magnet in contact with the socket as you unscrew the tensioner. That way if the tape if pushed off the piston you still have a chance. I would rather epoxy the face of the piston to the socket.
 






I could use epoxy. Do you think it would hold?

I was also going to try and put a tie wrap around it IF I have room.

I don't know if I can put the tie wrap on first and then through the hole before threading.



Cliff
 






What have you decided to do about the broken bearing cap?

Im pretty sure you cant just pop another one on. It will need to go to a machine shop for cam bearing journal honing. I don't see why it would be any different then replacing a main bearing cap. They are machined to match the block or head.
 






If epoxy use a rag

Make sure the diameter of the socket is larger than the diameter of the piston so it will not retract into the housing with the piston. It will be difficult for you to compress the piston with the spacer to start the tensioner threads in the hole. Using the longer front tensioner will increase the difficulty. If you use epoxy then stuff a rag in the opening under where the tensioner/spacer will be. Make a depression (cup) in the rag so if the spacer separates from the piston the spacer will fall into the depression and can be easily retrieved with a magnet. Make sure the rag blocks all of the possible ways that the spacer could fall into the depths of the head.
 






Well I just went to our local engine Head machine shop.

According to him...not good news!

He said the chances of getting a Cam Cap with the same clearance is not good.

The cam is align bored to .0008 of clearance!


I need to buy a replacement head.

I found this on Ebay:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/FORD...r_Truck_Parts_Accessories?hash=item255606e7c6


He gave me some prices.

Head Core........................$175
Lab check........................$92
Manifold gasket set............$19.31
Fel Fel Pro........................$34.70
Fel Fel Pro........................$36.02

Total...............................$369.53


He also said I could just put it back together with the cracked Cap and it will still run but for how long.

I may just do that to see if I have any bent valves.



http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/FORD...r_Truck_Parts_Accessories?hash=item255606e7c6



I'm so lucky!





Cliff
 






I have a pair on the shelf.. could be the casting number he would need....

Ill do him one up $220 shipped

From this thread. http://www.explorerforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=271943&page=5

PM this guy and see what he says about it.

I wonder if problems with that bearing journal is what caused the cam sprocket to slip in the first place. What condition are the bearings in? Any sign of damage to the cam or other journals when you pull the other caps? Could be once it heated up it got tight.

This job just got a whole lot bigger. I strongly recommend getting the cam tool set before going any further to prevent this sort of problem from happening again. Cam Timing Set
 






From this thread. http://www.explorerforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=271943&page=5

PM this guy and see what he says about it.

I wonder if problems with that bearing journal is what caused the cam sprocket to slip in the first place. What condition are the bearings in? Any sign of damage to the cam or other journals when you pull the other caps? Could be once it heated up it got tight.

This job just got a whole lot bigger. I strongly recommend getting the cam tool set before going any further to prevent this sort of problem from happening again. Cam Timing Set

Thanks Bob,


I'm very Leary about trying to torque the caps again with the medicine bottle strips.

I don't have the moneyto spare for the heads, let alone the proper tools right now because I'm out of work due to the Obama economy;)

It's bad enough being forced to pay for insurance on a vehicle I can't use!


Is there another way I can hold the cam while I torque the sprocket bolt? I have the locking pliers but I don't like putting that much force on the cam. With my luck with this jinxed vehicle that would crack to!


I'm looking in to all options for now......



I', so Lucky.......:D
 



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Is there another way I can hold the cam while I torque the sprocket bolt? I have the locking pliers but I don't like putting that much force on the cam. With my luck with this jinxed vehicle that would crack to!

Nothing I would recommend, doing this job without the correct tools could result in major engine damage, as you now know. Why are you still trying to put it back together with a damaged head?

Bob
 






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