My 2000 Explorer 4 door XLT | Page 6 | Ford Explorer Forums - Serious Explorations

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My 2000 Explorer 4 door XLT

Engine with the lower intake manifold off. Looked pretty nasty in there. LOL
View attachment 322237

New lower intake gasket, and both valve covers installed.
Excessive use of Ultra Copper RTV, it's like my signature on engine work. LOL

View attachment 322238
I painted my old rusty water elbow. Cleaned up with angle grinder and primed/painted with Duplicolor Ford Grey. Matches my valve covers. You don't need RTV for it. The thermostat gasket seals it. Guess it can't hurt. 96 also has an overengineered heavy bracket that goes over the passenger valve cover, attaches to the upper intake and exhaust manifold. The coil sits on it. Weighs about 5 lbs and Probably cost Ford a few bucks. The top intake is slightly different too.
 



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Both banks have the same Fuel Trim? What is the BARO reading? How are the rubber upper plenum gaskets? They shouldn't be squashed flat.
Both banks had same fuel trims, so no bank to bank differences. The rubber upper plenum gaskets/seals are new since I just installed the lower intake gaskets.

The BARO reading was somewhere between 155-159 Hz, why do you ask?(I am curious as most don't even look at the BARO reading or know where it comes from). I used to teach Ford drivability classes so I memorized where the BARO spec chart is in the PC/ED and eventually memorized the spec for my altitude.
I really do love engine performance diagnostics, and no starts are also in with my favorite things to diagnose.
 






Both banks had same fuel trims, so no bank to bank differences. The rubber upper plenum gaskets/seals are new since I just installed the lower intake gaskets.

The BARO reading was somewhere between 155-159 Hz, why do you ask?(I am curious as most don't even look at the BARO reading or know where it comes from). I used to teach Ford drivability classes so I memorized where the BARO spec chart is in the PC/ED and eventually memorized the spec for my altitude.
I really do love engine performance diagnostics, and no starts are also in with my favorite things to diagnose.
Baro could indicate a bad maf or Exhaust blockage. Both banks usually indicate something above the base engine. Your numbers sound good.

Could be a slightly aging fuel pump. I would block off every vac line, brake booster, etc and see what happens. I had a good to the eye EGR but it leaked thru the lower pintle bushing. It was easy to see with propane. These are the subtle things fuel trims kinda account for.
There is also an evap line, but I'm not sure if that comes into play at idle.

I'm more on the technical side. I actually have a copy of the internal PCM software, so I understand how everything happens from a very technical point of view. BARO is a very complex equation.
 






Well, you've been busy with a new truck I see. I'm sure you can keep it going seeing what you've done so far with it. I could have helped in a couple of months, I'm retiring and won't need my spare SUV's soon. My 99 still needs the 5R rebuilt and I've finally had a little more time off work. Work has been hell since July so I've seen my way to check out retirement, and have taken off 2-3 days a week. I'm down to maybe two weeks of critical stuff I haven't been able to get to, then I may be working on my cars more.

Keep at it, we all love to see some serious work being done.
 






Well, you've been busy with a new truck I see. I'm sure you can keep it going seeing what you've done so far with it. I could have helped in a couple of months, I'm retiring and won't need my spare SUV's soon. My 99 still needs the 5R rebuilt and I've finally had a little more time off work. Work has been hell since July so I've seen my way to check out retirement, and have taken off 2-3 days a week. I'm down to maybe two weeks of critical stuff I haven't been able to get to, then I may be working on my cars more.

Keep at it, we all love to see some serious work being done.
Congratulations on nearing your retirement! I wish I could retire and spend more time working in my home garage, LOL.
My poor vehicles need the attention for sure. hahaha.
 






Baro could indicate a bad maf or Exhaust blockage. Both banks usually indicate something above the base engine. Your numbers sound good.

Could be a slightly aging fuel pump. I would block off every vac line, brake booster, etc and see what happens. I had a good to the eye EGR but it leaked thru the lower pintle bushing. It was easy to see with propane. These are the subtle things fuel trims kinda account for.
There is also an evap line, but I'm not sure if that comes into play at idle.

I'm more on the technical side. I actually have a copy of the internal PCM software, so I understand how everything happens from a very technical point of view. BARO is a very complex equation.

I found a lot of dirty MAF sensors by looking at the BARO reading, most worked the way they should after cleaning. When Ford introduced the ESM type EGR valve things changed. The ESM had a DPFE sensor built into it and the PCM used that sensor for a BARO reading at KOEO.
My supercharged 2004 Explorer has that type of EGR valve. I had an issue on that truck where the EGR monitor would not run after installing the supercharger and tuning it with Advantage 3 software by SCT. I ended up splitting the tune changes in half (only changing half of the stuff in the tune) which narrowed it down. Then I split that amount in half and so on until I narrowed it down to an adjustment to the BARO in the tune.

For the older vehicles that used the MAF(and other things) to calculate BARO, SCT had you lock the BARO in so it could never change because the PCM would learn wrong due to boosting and altered MAF transfer functions etc. It works quite well on my 98 two door with the GT500 supercharger on it and there were no bad side effects. The notes in the tuning software still say to lock the BARO in for my 2004 but it is old information and doesn't work well with the ESM egr valve vehicles because it disables the EGR system so it never operates and the BARO comes from the DPFE sensor anyway so there is no need to lock the BARO down on those vehicles.

I have ruled out the Fuel pump because of the fuel trims.
There are 4 different scenarios that can be diagnosed by them.
First you add the STFT and LTFT together for each bank at Idle, then aproximately 2,000 rpm's.

1. If fuel trims are high at Idle but not so bad at 2,000 then you have a vacuum leak.
Example: Fuel Trims 18% at idle and 7% at 2,000 would indicate a vacuum leak.
Reason: At idle there is only a little air and fuel going into the cylinders to keep it running.
You add air through a vacuum leak and it doubles the amount of air.
At 2000 RPM's there is a lot more air and fuel so that same size vacuum leak doesn't effect the mixture as much so fuel trims wont be as high.

2. If fuel trims are high at 2,000 rpm but not so bad at idle, that would indicate fuel starvation, weak fuel pump, clogged fuel filter, excessive resistance in power or ground to the fuel pump. etc.
Example: Fuel trims 18% at 2,000 and 7% at Idle.
Reason: You need more fuel at higher engine loads/ rpms, a weak pump can not keep up with the demand. At idle the engine doesnt need very much fuel to keep it running.

Then there are Fuel trims taking away fuel.
3. Fuel trims reading negative like -18% at idle and only -7% at 2,000 rpm's would be excessive fueling (fuel pressure too high from bad sensor or stuck closed fuel pressure regulator.

4. Fuel trims reading -18% at 2,000 rpm's and only 7% at idle would be an air inlet restriction like a dirty air filter.

Then there are other things like when I first got this truck and it was adding about 20% at Idle and 2,000 rpm's.
The wrong PCM for the engine/injectors, the 4.0 OHV engine has smaller injectors than the SOHC 4.0
Funny thing is the fuel pressure specs are the same for this 2,000 in OHV and SOHC and both are mechanical returnless fuel systems.
Swapping the correct PCM in brought the fuel trims to near perfect (outside of what looks like a very small vacuum leak)

One of the other diagnostic techs I now work with had a Cadillac with rich codes for both banks. Looking at fuel trims showed the PCM removing 20% fuel at idle and 2,000 rpm's. The MAF was the culprit, it was showing way too high of a air flow reading(grams per second) so the PCM was mixing in too much fuel and then the o2 sensors were telling the PCM to remove it. LOL

So this truck's fuel trims, resemble the vacuum leak but just a minor example of that. Fuel trims are adding a little at idle and nothing at higher rpms.

You are right about the Evap system being able to cause vacuum leaks. If the purge line or something related has a leak, there will be a leak when the purge valve is commanded open(which can happen any time now, idle, off idle,cruise,WOT). I did find that broken gas tank vent valve and replaced it. Since then the Evap monitor ran once so the monitor showed up completed and it passed because there were no pending codes. Tomorrow I plan to check the monitors and codes again. I don't expect any codes now, it is pretty close to running perfect except for the slightly high idle hang.
 






I found a lot of dirty MAF sensors by looking at the BARO reading, most worked the way they should after cleaning. When Ford introduced the ESM type EGR valve things changed. The ESM had a DPFE sensor built into it and the PCM used that sensor for a BARO reading at KOEO.
My supercharged 2004 Explorer has that type of EGR valve. I had an issue on that truck where the EGR monitor would not run after installing the supercharger and tuning it with Advantage 3 software by SCT. I ended up splitting the tune changes in half (only changing half of the stuff in the tune) which narrowed it down. Then I split that amount in half and so on until I narrowed it down to an adjustment to the BARO in the tune.

For the older vehicles that used the MAF(and other things) to calculate BARO, SCT had you lock the BARO in so it could never change because the PCM would learn wrong due to boosting and altered MAF transfer functions etc. It works quite well on my 98 two door with the GT500 supercharger on it and there were no bad side effects. The notes in the tuning software still say to lock the BARO in for my 2004 but it is old information and doesn't work well with the ESM egr valve vehicles because it disables the EGR system so it never operates and the BARO comes from the DPFE sensor anyway so there is no need to lock the BARO down on those vehicles.

I have ruled out the Fuel pump because of the fuel trims.
There are 4 different scenarios that can be diagnosed by them.
First you add the STFT and LTFT together for each bank at Idle, then aproximately 2,000 rpm's.

1. If fuel trims are high at Idle but not so bad at 2,000 then you have a vacuum leak.
Example: Fuel Trims 18% at idle and 7% at 2,000 would indicate a vacuum leak.
Reason: At idle there is only a little air and fuel going into the cylinders to keep it running.
You add air through a vacuum leak and it doubles the amount of air.
At 2000 RPM's there is a lot more air and fuel so that same size vacuum leak doesn't effect the mixture as much so fuel trims wont be as high.

2. If fuel trims are high at 2,000 rpm but not so bad at idle, that would indicate fuel starvation, weak fuel pump, clogged fuel filter, excessive resistance in power or ground to the fuel pump. etc.
Example: Fuel trims 18% at 2,000 and 7% at Idle.
Reason: You need more fuel at higher engine loads/ rpms, a weak pump can not keep up with the demand. At idle the engine doesnt need very much fuel to keep it running.

Then there are Fuel trims taking away fuel.
3. Fuel trims reading negative like -18% at idle and only -7% at 2,000 rpm's would be excessive fueling (fuel pressure too high from bad sensor or stuck closed fuel pressure regulator.

4. Fuel trims reading -18% at 2,000 rpm's and only 7% at idle would be an air inlet restriction like a dirty air filter.

Then there are other things like when I first got this truck and it was adding about 20% at Idle and 2,000 rpm's.
The wrong PCM for the engine/injectors, the 4.0 OHV engine has smaller injectors than the SOHC 4.0
Funny thing is the fuel pressure specs are the same for this 2,000 in OHV and SOHC and both are mechanical returnless fuel systems.
Swapping the correct PCM in brought the fuel trims to near perfect (outside of what looks like a very small vacuum leak)

One of the other diagnostic techs I now work with had a Cadillac with rich codes for both banks. Looking at fuel trims showed the PCM removing 20% fuel at idle and 2,000 rpm's. The MAF was the culprit, it was showing way too high of a air flow reading(grams per second) so the PCM was mixing in too much fuel and then the o2 sensors were telling the PCM to remove it. LOL

So this truck's fuel trims, resemble the vacuum leak but just a minor example of that. Fuel trims are adding a little at idle and nothing at higher rpms.

You are right about the Evap system being able to cause vacuum leaks. If the purge line or something related has a leak, there will be a leak when the purge valve is commanded open(which can happen any time now, idle, off idle,cruise,WOT). I did find that broken gas tank vent valve and replaced it. Since then the Evap monitor ran once so the monitor showed up completed and it passed because there were no pending codes. Tomorrow I plan to check the monitors and codes again. I don't expect any codes now, it is pretty close to running perfect except for the slightly high idle hang.
Thanks for clarifying those edge cases, you really know your stuff. A bad MAF can certainly resemble a vacuum leak. Here is the old Ford TSB: TSB 98-23-10 Mass Air Flow Contamination

I only worked professionally on cars for a year or so in the late 90s, just when OBDII came out. I work in engineering/software now, but I keep a few cars to play around with.

I think (from the code) BARO is computed at near WOT (max air flow). It should correspond to actual (not corrected) barometric pressure.

The injectors control the volume of gas sent to the engine, so as long as it is above a threshold most Fords will have the same spec.

What about dirty injectors at idle? I bet that would also manifest at higher RPMS. You also have access to a smoke machine at work, so you can see if there are any leaks.
 






LOL, I have a smoke machine at home, and it's a good thing because we can not bring our vehicles in to work on them.
I do all my repairs and upgrades at home, sometimes in the driveway and sometimes in the garage.
I hope to get my Ranger transmission finished before it gets below 40° F outside, have not even started pulling it out yet.

Engineering/software sounds interesting. If I were to start my life over again knowing what I know now, I would have pursued a career in automotive engineering for sure. Heck, if I find myself not having to work 8 hours a day at some point in the near future, I may look into furthering my education.
 






That TSB was a great one, I'm glad someone posted it on the internet for others to see.
That BARO chart was later put into the pinpoint tests for the MAF sensor.
The pinpoint test is DC in Section 5 of the PC/ED for those that might have access to the Ford Manual.

To update the BARO information I already did mention how the vehicles with ESM type EGR valves used the DPFE sensor (which is built into the EGR Valve now) to measure BARO at KOEO (key on engine off).

Now the newer vehicles that Ford is making have MAP sensors instead of MAF sensors. So after all the years of saying how MAF was better because the PCM didn't have to compute as much with MAF systems as with speed density (MAP) systems, now they go back to MAP's like they had years ago.
One of my thoughts on that is that turbo vehicles are easier to tune with MAP's then MAF's.
And the BARO? hahaha, that is now a sensor built into the PCM. There is a little black round piece in about the middle of a lot of PCM's these days, and that is the BARO sensor. If it fails, guess what your replacing! LOL. I'm sure someone with skills could solder a new one in, but It would probably be a rare thing if it did happen.

PCM.jpg
 






LOL, I have a smoke machine at home, and it's a good thing because we can not bring our vehicles in to work on them.
I do all my repairs and upgrades at home, sometimes in the driveway and sometimes in the garage.
I hope to get my Ranger transmission finished before it gets below 40° F outside, have not even started pulling it out yet.

Engineering/software sounds interesting. If I were to start my life over again knowing what I know now, I would have pursued a career in automotive engineering for sure. Heck, if I find myself not having to work 8 hours a day at some point in the near future, I may look into furthering my education.
Removing engines and transmissions without a lift is a real pita.

Yes, I may design an "OBD" style interface for an expensive piece of industrial equipment.
 






That TSB was a great one, I'm glad someone posted it on the internet for others to see.
That BARO chart was later put into the pinpoint tests for the MAF sensor.
The pinpoint test is DC in Section 5 of the PC/ED for those that might have access to the Ford Manual.

To update the BARO information I already did mention how the vehicles with ESM type EGR valves used the DPFE sensor (which is built into the EGR Valve now) to measure BARO at KOEO (key on engine off).

Now the newer vehicles that Ford is making have MAP sensors instead of MAF sensors. So after all the years of saying how MAF was better because the PCM didn't have to compute as much with MAF systems as with speed density (MAP) systems, now they go back to MAP's like they had years ago.
One of my thoughts on that is that turbo vehicles are easier to tune with MAP's then MAF's.
And the BARO? hahaha, that is now a sensor built into the PCM. There is a little black round piece in about the middle of a lot of PCM's these days, and that is the BARO sensor. If it fails, guess what your replacing! LOL. I'm sure someone with skills could solder a new one in, but It would probably be a rare thing if it did happen.

View attachment 322411
Forced induction vehicles seems to use MAP sensors. I know the Tbird SC had one, but the regular Tbird didn't. I'm surprised they but the baro sensor on the PCM, seems computing it in software is cheaper, but they may need it as a very accurate reference, and not just a parameter.
 






...

Now the newer vehicles that Ford is making have MAP sensors instead of MAF sensors. So after all the years of saying how MAF was better because the PCM didn't have to compute as much with MAF systems as with speed density (MAP) systems, now they go back to MAP's like they had years ago.
One of my thoughts on that is that turbo vehicles are easier to tune with MAP's then MAF's.
...

Curious, what computer system would you prefer to run a 302 stroker with a blower and intercooler? Mine is the stock 98 PCM, but I had a couple of years ago considered a Mustang PCM from the 99-04 range. A member posted long ago that they had an easier time tuning those SN95 Mustang PCM's, for boosted Mustang V8's. I don't want to change anything not necessary, but if it would make a big difference, I'd think about it more.
 






Curious, what computer system would you prefer to run a 302 stroker with a blower and intercooler? Mine is the stock 98 PCM, but I had a couple of years ago considered a Mustang PCM from the 99-04 range. A member posted long ago that they had an easier time tuning those SN95 Mustang PCM's, for boosted Mustang V8's. I don't want to change anything not necessary, but if it would make a big difference, I'd think about it more.
I would go with the Mustang PCM if possible. There are already developed files that make tuning so much more easier.
There is a lot of information out there for Mustang tuning for all kinds of power adders etc, but not much for Explorer stuff.
 






I replaced the IAC motor this week with the correct one for the 4.0 OHV engine. The idle is much more like it should be.
Did not get a chance to look at the pids in datalogger yet but the vehicle doesn't drive itself down the road anymore.
There still seems to be a little bit of a high idle only with the AC on, but it is so minute that I forget I even had an idle problem.
I even felt the vehicle slowing down during deceleration when my foot was off the gas, I will look at the pids again when I get the chance.

IMG_8619.JPG
 






I would go with the Mustang PCM if possible. There are already developed files that make tuning so much more easier.
There is a lot of information out there for Mustang tuning for all kinds of power adders etc, but not much for Explorer stuff.
Don't push me. The idea was to merge a 4.6 engine harness with one from my Explorer, to mount the Mustang PCM in the stock hole. Then the wiring would be there and plug in, for COP's and a knock sensor.

I'm doing something similar for the engine harness for my 92 Lincoln, a 2002 Mustang harness to make the PCM fit in the stock right kick panel location. That'll be an easy NA 347 though, an all Explorer engine/trans/accessories system.
 






Today I installed a remote start/alarm on this 2000 Explorer.
The system was on my old blue 98 four door that this truck replaced due to rust.
Its an old Code Alarm system that I have grown very fond of, I have the same one in my 2001 Ranger and the 98 supercharged Explorer (Race Truck). I even have a hand held programmer for them so I don't have to jump through hoops to set them up the way I want them with 20 minute runs times and other options etc.

Here is where I install the module. It seems to fit right in there.

IMG_8971.JPG


I was lucky enough to have an ignition T-harness on my old 98 that I pulled this unit out of. The harness worked with the 2000 Explorer without modifications so it saved me a lot of time. I put the vehicle in the garage on Friday night after work, removed the driver seat and instrument cluster that same night. Saturday I got up early and started attaching the wires and by 7:00 PM I was done the whole job and eating dinner.

IMG_8973.JPG
 






I just found a vinyl/leather replacement lower seat cover for the original seats that came out of this truck (which I still have).
The color is Medium Graphite (they have tan and dark graphite too). The company name is The Seat Shop.
I have been looking for a replacement cover but have only found tan up until this point.
The add just cam up on Facebook so I checked them out and found the replacement cover.
Maybe they will make a replacement foam pad one day for the second gen Explorers? That would be nice.

My old seat is below, I will try to update this post with the finished results when ever I receive the cover and install it.

IMG_7479.JPG
 






I just found a vinyl/leather replacement lower seat cover for the original seats that came out of this truck (which I still have).
The color is Medium Graphite (they have tan and dark graphite too). The company name is The Seat Shop.
I have been looking for a replacement cover but have only found tan up until this point.
The add just cam up on Facebook so I checked them out and found the replacement cover.
Maybe they will make a replacement foam pad one day for the second gen Explorers? That would be nice.

My old seat is below, I will try to update this post with the finished results when ever I receive the cover and install it.

View attachment 324815
You can install heated seats!
 






Today 11-27-2020 I installed a new battery in this black 2000 4 door Explorer.
The old battery came with the silver 2004 Explorer I bought in 2016, then was swapped into the old blue 98 2 door Explorer that rusted to pieces and I just had towed away, then was swapped into this 2000 Explorer before I junked the blue one. LOL.

The old battery was dying a slow death and I wanted a new battery so I don't have to worry about it in the cold winter months ahead.
I hate old style batteries that leak gases out the top and corrode the terminals which can lead to having to replace the battery cables.
So I picked up an AGM style battery with the Diehard name on it(part number 65AGM). It cost me 202.97 after taxes and discounts from Advance Auto.
List price was listed as 219.99, I took the core with me so I didn't have to pay that. I got 10% off the battery with a discount code DH10 and had a $10.00 speed perk coupon for a total of $31.00 off. New price was 188.99 but uncle sam had his hand out for $13.98 (Taxes). New total 202.97

I hope this battery lasts!
 



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Mileage Update
I put 925 miles on this vehicle since I got it. Keep in mind the original engine is not in it (someone removed the 4.0 SOHC and installed a 4.0 OHV engine).

IMG_9042.JPG
 






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