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Need help training a dominant puppy

Mbrooks420

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I have a 5 month old Austrailian Shepherd. I've had him about a month and a half. I messed up on not sticking to my guns and beginning the training from day one. He is a dominant puppy, and does not always feel he has to listen. He also likes to challenge me. I do the normal reccomended things like flip him over and hold him on his back, and lift his front feet off of the ground by his scruff, but sometimes this just seems to make matters worse. I will not have a puppy who thinks he is the boss, so I need a little education on how to train him. Any help would be appreciated.

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TravisC

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We've got an Austrailian Shepard that's 5 years old but she's a baby so it wasn't hard to train her. Now I have a 6 month old Boxer and he's a little hard headed himself. When trying to train a dominate dog if he doesn't obey or does something he's not suppose to, ignore him. And you MUST reward him when he does something right. He he sits when you tell him to sit "praise" him and give him a treat. If you have to get a little rough with him to obey then do it. I've found out that is a good way to get the dog to respect you. He might even have to fear you a little bit to obey. Hope everything works out for you. I've having some luch with my dog, I can at least get him to sit. :p He's my boxer and our Aussy.
 

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spindlecone

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have four Redbone hounds, they get testy, a pair of vicegrips attached to an ear brings them in line real quick, pls do not flame me, the animals are not pets, are purely wild pig huntin dawgs, well fed and well treated in a humane fashion, but they are working dawgs
 
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Mbrooks420

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I certainly won't be doing anything in the lines of visegripping an ear. We apparently have different views of humane.
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BBQ_HotDogs

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I will only give you 1 word of advice, stick to your guns with a dog and never slap it in the face. If it nips you, bite it back, show em how it feels. If it poops or pees in the house, they hate having there noses rubbed in it. But you must do it and then take them outside immediately so they know where to go. When they do go outside, reward them with treats and praise. They love it and learn very quickly. But (ROFL) don't let them lick your face after you have done the rubbing before a bath. EWWWWWWWW.......................... ROFL

Mine is in the background of BBQ Time thread. I just love Cocker Spaniels.

Here is the father of our next litter
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Mbrooks420

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The potty training is going well. 2 days without an accident. He is bright, and does pck up on things, he just thinks he is the master.
 
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spindlecone

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Am talkin working dawgs, not your run of the mill housepet, if one uses dawgs as working dawgs, they are not pets.
you got a bad dawg with a bad habit, you need to use extreame measures, as a child I was raised on a poultry farm, you get a nieghbors dog that comes in and kills chickens, it was shot and killed, no questions asked and no apoligys needed to the owner of the dawg, was a given.
One of my dawgs killed a chicken, I would tie the dead chickin around the dawgs neck and let it rot for two weeks, the maggots and yellow jackets would drive the dawg nuts to the point that when the carcass was removed, the dawg would never come near a chickin ever again, problem solved, cruel, maybe, a solution, always
 
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Mbrooks420

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My puppy is certainly not a "run of the mill" anything. He is also not a "bad dog" Aussie's are more prone to being dominant than other dogs. It has pro's and cons. Once you get through that you are the master, the dog will simply dominate other dogs, pets ect, and that is fine with me. I like to see my puppy run off full grown dogs.
 
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unclemeat

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The secret to training a dog is realitively simple. The more time you spend with the animal the better it will be trained. The reward system works best. It will also help you to take an obedience class. The point of the class is not to teach the dog to obey, it is to teach you how to train and communicate with the dog. Once you learn how to train the dog it is much easer handle it. If the dog thinks the bathroon is inside, then crate training works very well.
 
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Mbrooks420

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He is crate training now. He never has had an accident in there. He is picking up on the housetraining well. Again the problem I am having isn't really an obedience problem. Its a dominance problem.
 
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BBQ_HotDogs

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Just stick to your guns, he will soon learn. Don't give in, they are like children. Just a hard headed little child who may need a good smack with a rolled up newspaper every once in awhile. But love me, and teach em. Stick with it. You will be fine. He will soon learn. You take him/her for a walk daily? On a leach? I bet he/she doesn't like that leach. But he learns from your voice commands. He/she knows when you are happy, sad, angry, and just plain old mad. Just be patient as the dog is learning adn pushing to see how much he can get away with just like a child. Good luck......
 
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aldive

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I have had hunting dawgs all my life and have never put anything on their ears, must less a vice grip, and never will. Further, anyone who puts anything on my dawgs ear(s) will get a rapid old fashoned arse whooping.
 
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Ritsui

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Direct negative (pain, fright, etc.) training methods may have their place in extreme situations with hard cases... but in my experience, they :

1) Are only effective when used at the exact instant the dog does wrong. Two seconds later and it's pointless abuse.

2) Tend to create a more aggressive and defiant dog... moreso with certain breeds (like cattle dogs).


I think the key to training most dogs (at any age) to always listen to you is to make sure there is always a positive result when they do listen. Start with the smallest things like sit/stays and use whatever reward motivates that particular dog. Our aussie mix needs nothing but acknowledgement from us (hug, praise) as a reward, but our other dogs have usually been more food motivated.

To make a dominant dog submissive, you simply have to be the Alpha at all times and be absolutely consistant. Never let him "have his way" unless it is specifically by your invitation and don't let anyone else get in the way of the training. If kids/friends are around, make them train him too so rewards are always the result of obedience, never "handouts" or you/others giving in to the dogs demands.

Some dogs can take what feels like forever to train, but I've never heard of a normal, healthy dog which couldn't be trained simply by being 100% consistant so the dog always knows what's expected of them.
 
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