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Need New Brake Pads, Rotors, Ect.

interscope8

Explorer Addict
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April 22, 2010
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City, State
Purdue University
Year, Model & Trim Level
2001 Sport Trac 4x4
Ive changed my pads before, not my rotors. Doesnt look to hard from what Ive seen. But here is the weird thing...

I put Duralast C Max (Ceramic) pads on the front breaks a year ago. And they've already thinned out!? My buddy noticed when we had the truck up on the lift during my shackle/ shock install. He things maybe its cuz my rear drums arent preforming like they should, so the fronts had to do more work to stop the truck.

What do yall think is up here? And what brand pads/ rotors should i invest in. I think im done with Autozone brand $h|t
 



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I always recommend Bendix Fleet MetLoc brake pads/shoes. Had excellent results with them in fleet operations ........ and you know how fleet drivers are.

MKD833FM is the front pad part number. 723 Rear shoe number '01-'02.
Bendix Online Catalog
 
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AutoZone sells good parts, I'd take them back and get them replaced under warranty. Bendix are good brake parts too.
 






Put on some professional grade parts, not service grade stuff. Warranty is fine, but it's a pain in the ass to have to keep pulling parts off to replace them.
 






any ideas on y my pads ran thin so soon? if its the drums i have no clue how to fix that...
 


















You may want to adjust your brake drum shoes. You live out where it's primarily flat too, WTH.

I know here in Pittsburgh I go through brake pads about once a year, maybe a year and a half if I'm lucky. I don't let them get down much past the wear line if that because the truck doesn't like to stop very good once it gets that low. There's nothing but steep ass hills and mountains around here there and it's a major city with nothing but traffic so I can't avoid it.
 






I was in high school when I started restoring my '69 Cougar. I got Autozone pads with the lifetime warranty. Why they would offer that on parts designed to wear out, I don't know. Not sure if they still have this practice? Every time I had the wheels off, though, I'd change out the brake pads because I was probably headed to Autozone anyway. No questions asked. That insured I always had new pads. Alternator, too. :D
 






I've had my truck for 2.75 years and I've taken the pads off a bunch of times to do other work and everytime I look at them, they still have a good amount of meat on them. I'm amazed they've lasted this long. I once took a look at the rear shoes intending to replace them and they looked like they were new. I live in flat country also. I guess the previous owner had good pads installed. I know he didn't do it himself.
 






I was talking to the owner of my mechanic shop the other day while getting an alignement. He said to go with Wagner brakes. Bendix are also a good brand. Stay away from the autozone stuff. I had a set of duralast rear pads last 15k, then they "couldnt find the warranty info" so I got another pair, which lasted a day until I returned them because they did nothing but burn up on braking.
 






You say they lasted a year. Time doesn't matter, how many miles did you drive? Im not familiar with your specific pads but ceramic pads (all pad types) will vary wildly from each manufacturer. Ceramic pads just means there is some ceramic (who knows how much, what type, or anything about the rest of the formulation) in the pad. The brake industry has few standards in this regard. Typically ceramic pads are designed for quiet operation and minimal dust. This is why they are often used as factory pads.

Remember, all things automotive are about comprimises. For the average guy, quiet, dustless and fairly cheap, is what matters for brake pads. Admittedly, I live in an area where few people do anything to their cars themselves. The last time I was changing my own brakes in the drive, the guy down the street asked "why, doesn't it stop?", "you know you could just take it to Midas, they'll do it in like 1 hour". Clearly, he just doesn't get it. Neither does the vast majority of the motoring public. Cermaic pads usually trade off all other traits to achive their quiet operation with low dusting. Other things to consider in a pad are; cost, life expectancy, heat disipation, heat resistance, initial bite, repeated/prolonged fade resisitance, pressure to achieve a given decleration rate among a host of other parameters.

You seem to be concerned about how long they wear also but a bit less about price. I have two suggestions if these are your priorities. First, Ford factory pads. No these are not the exact same formulation as Motorcraft pads. Factory pads last me about 75,000 miles on my Explorer (daily driver, moderate off-road, heavy towing). They are quiet, relativly low dusting, moderatly priced and last a long time. Remember, these are not the same as Motorcraft. Second, my personal favorite, Hawk Super Duty. These perform exceptionally. Good heat tolerance, long lasting (50K miles for me) decent initial bite, good fade resistance, moderate dusting, and if installed exactly to the manufacturers specifications quiet too. They are however a little pricey. Another ceramic pad may give you the service life, quiet and low dusting you're after but it is a matter of guessing. As i said, each will differ wildly. The proper Ceramic with the correct manufacturing technique and the proper proportions even works well in the extremes of an endurance racing inviroment but it requires a complete braking system designed to work in this enviroment with this exact pad.

Wonder how I have experience with a variety of pads etc.? I drive about 50-60K miles a year and my girlfriend racks up another 45K. Spread across several different vehicles of coarse. I do all of my own maintenance. Putting that many miles a year on or vehicles gives me a vast degree of experience with most things involving maintenance. My priorities are heavily scewed towards performance but this allows me to learn where and on what to spend my money.
 






You say they lasted a year. Time doesn't matter, how many miles did you drive? Im not familiar with your specific pads but ceramic pads (all pad types) will vary wildly from each manufacturer. Ceramic pads just means there is some ceramic (who knows how much, what type, or anything about the rest of the formulation) in the pad. The brake industry has few standards in this regard. Typically ceramic pads are designed for quiet operation and minimal dust. This is why they are often used as factory pads.

Remember, all things automotive are about comprimises. For the average guy, quiet, dustless and fairly cheap, is what matters for brake pads. Admittedly, I live in an area where few people do anything to their cars themselves. The last time I was changing my own brakes in the drive, the guy down the street asked "why, doesn't it stop?", "you know you could just take it to Midas, they'll do it in like 1 hour". Clearly, he just doesn't get it. Neither does the vast majority of the motoring public. Cermaic pads usually trade off all other traits to achive their quiet operation with low dusting. Other things to consider in a pad are; cost, life expectancy, heat disipation, heat resistance, initial bite, repeated/prolonged fade resisitance, pressure to achieve a given decleration rate among a host of other parameters.

You seem to be concerned about how long they wear also but a bit less about price. I have two suggestions if these are your priorities. First, Ford factory pads. No these are not the exact same formulation as Motorcraft pads. Factory pads last me about 75,000 miles on my Explorer (daily driver, moderate off-road, heavy towing). They are quiet, relativly low dusting, moderatly priced and last a long time. Remember, these are not the same as Motorcraft. Second, my personal favorite, Hawk Super Duty. These perform exceptionally. Good heat tolerance, long lasting (50K miles for me) decent initial bite, good fade resistance, moderate dusting, and if installed exactly to the manufacturers specifications quiet too. They are however a little pricey. Another ceramic pad may give you the service life, quiet and low dusting you're after but it is a matter of guessing. As i said, each will differ wildly. The proper Ceramic with the correct manufacturing technique and the proper proportions even works well in the extremes of an endurance racing inviroment but it requires a complete braking system designed to work in this enviroment with this exact pad.

Wonder how I have experience with a variety of pads etc.? I drive about 50-60K miles a year and my girlfriend racks up another 45K. Spread across several different vehicles of coarse. I do all of my own maintenance. Putting that many miles a year on or vehicles gives me a vast degree of experience with most things involving maintenance. My priorities are heavily scewed towards performance but this allows me to learn where and on what to spend my money.


I was told by multiple people that the ceramic duralast C MAX pads would last a good while. Ive driven maybe 8 thousand miles in the year. Also, the pads I got cost more than the average pads there... but high price doesnt always mean higher quality.

I dont (or at least havent yet) off road at all. Its strictly driving home, to work, to campus, and around. I would like stuff for towing since I sometimes tow a trailer with either a golf cart and camping gear or a camper.

I can read reviews on pads all day... Ive come to the conclusion here I should give Bendix and Hawk Super Duty a look. Or go to AutoZone and see if I can cash in on the lifetime warranty. The pads I had did great. Quiet, didnt dust, would stop just as good as it did when i got it (havent been behind it enough to know whats best or not) and were only $80 for the pair.
 






Note:
Not sure why there is a thumbs down in the title line of that post, I assure u I am not thumbing down to ur info :p
 






I've done best with NAPA Ceramix pads.
 






Oh, I by no means mean to suggest that you should get the AutoZone brake pads. I don't buy them any longer; it was just nice while I was in high school, broke and knew that I would have the wheels off often due to a restoration on a daily driver. I still have that lifetime warranty on the pads* but haven't replaced them in years due to the fact that I stopped driving it. I will not be putting those pads back on. The next set will be high quality.

*Had to get a manager to hand write the information on a receipt and sign his name to it since their receipts are notorious for fading after a month and warranties "fall out of the system."
 






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