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Pinion seal

chad551

Explorer Addict
Joined
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City, State
St.Louis, MO
Year, Model & Trim Level
2002 Explorer Sport Trac
Ok I did a search and did not find my answer.

So my pinion seal is leaking, and I am thinking I can just pull the driveshaft, pull the yoke off and replace the seal without messing with the crush sleeve.

Am I crazy for thinking this?

Anyone done this?
 



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Not crazy...that's exactly how they fix it when you take it to a shop. Haven't done it myself but I hear its not too tough. Torque values on the pinion nut are very important from what I was told...because that affects the ring and pinion tolerance if you overtighten.
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Pinion Bearing Preload

It is MOST IMPORTANT that the preload on the pinion bearings be re-established after removing the U-Joint yoke to replace the seal. The bearing preload is "set" by the "crush sleeve" being squeezed between the 2 pinion bearings as the nut is tightened. If no bearings are replaced during the work, it is possible to re-establish the preload while tightening the nut, but in SOME cases the original crush sleeve will not support sufficient load, and the bearings will be OVER-PRELOADED and fail.

The other extreme is insufficient preload, which allows slight misalignment to occur between the ring and pinion gears, often resulting in gear failure.

The thing to do is remove the driveshaft, raise both wheels free to turn, and MEASURE the torque needed to turn the entire differential and axle assembly.---BEFORE YOU REMOVE THE NUT!
Then, after removing the nut, yoke, and seal, replace the seal and yoke, tightening the nut until a similar value of turning torque is reached. If that torque is reached without considerable tightness of the nut (say, 80 ft-lbs.), the crush sleeve will need to be replaced, requiring disassembly of the the differential. imp
 












Chad, I just called a local driveline shop, and they said $106.00 to replace the seal & crush sleeve. If the bearing wont come out, they said it will be over $300.00 to do it, as the gears all need reset. The chance of that happening is 50/50 they claim. They wont know until they remove the flange, and being they are in the bizz of making money, I know which half of chance mine will fall under :(

I am facing the same dilemma with mine, as the seal we replaced at Turdles started leaking less than 1k miles later.

What to do, oh what to do :scratch:
 






Chad, I just called a local driveline shop, and they said $106.00 to replace the seal & crush sleeve. If the bearing wont come out, they said it will be over $300.00 to do it, as the gears all need reset. The chance of that happening is 50/50 they claim. They wont know until they remove the flange, and being they are in the bizz of making money, I know which half of chance mine will fall under :(

I am facing the same dilemma with mine, as the seal we replaced at Turdles started leaking less than 1k miles later.

What to do, oh what to do :scratch:

Some pinion gears have a rather loose, sliding fit for the FRONT bearing (toward front of the vehicle). My experience with Ford 9" rear ends shows this; however, once the U-Joint flange is removed, and the oil seal, the bearing is buried back in there with no real way to grasp it to pull it off the front of the pinion snout, even if it is not real tight on the shaft.

Based on the price quoted, I would try to watch the operation if at alkl possible, since I suspect a bit of skullduggery might just be involved, and the only part being replaced would be the seal......other claims of crush sleeve replacement notwithstanding.....imp
 






Obviously perfect situation is to reset everything. But things aren't that easy. I replaced my rear one (8k) ago with no leaks or any sepage. And front (5k) ago same good results. Marked the pinion shaft with a punch and also the nut same way. Removed the nuts, replaced the seals, reinstalled yolks, and retightened the nut to the same position. Was easy and no problems at all. Use a little emery cloth to clean up the yolks surface and your good to go. If no new bearings are used then retightening the nut to the same position with get your preload almost dead on.
 






I was thinking the exact same process as turboex. But I thought it seemed to easy, so that is why I asked..
 






Here is my thread on my rear pinion seal replacement. Check out post #20 that's where I did the replacement with a few pictures.

Kyle's Rear Pinion Seal Replacement

Only issue might be getting the nut off. Sometimes as we all know 100'000 miles and years can make for some tight parts. 1/2" impact gun and your set. Anyways that's my 2 cents and experience with doing it. O and noticed its almost 16,000 miles since I did my rear still bone dry.

P.S. Side note, rebuilt my front diff 8k ish ago and had to replace that front pinion seal because for some reason it was folded so with it in the truck did same procedure as rear and still dry as well.
 






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