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Replace Rear Brake Pads & Rotors

EGUY4

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2014 Explorer Limited AWD
If I was charged $420 for rear rotors and pads I'd be pissed.

You can do the work yourself for half the price and within an hour.
Way less than an hour.

All you need is a jack, wrench, socket set!

When I discovered what brake parts cost vs what I was charged, and how long it took a novice (me) to do them I never went to a dealer for brakes ever again.

I can do them in about 25 mins, and so can you if you have the slightest mechanical knowledge.

I found a good mechanic who if I bring the parts to him charges less than $100 to cut or replace rotors and brakes.

I know dealers have a business to run, but they are a rip off with labor time/cost.

A few years back my old car was in the dealer for an issue with o2 sensors and the guy noticed a lug nut needed to be replaced, so I of course said sure.

Imagine my shock when I was charged $95 to replace a $6 part!

I had also seen a roadside mechanic at work change out the entire set of lug studs on an F550 in about 10 minutes.
 


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Halwg

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WV
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2018 Explorer Base 2.3L E
The thing is, I have no idea how you think replacing brakes on a vehicle is an easy job. It is not! And telling people ANYONE can do it is inviting them to have problems. Back when I was young and dumb, people told me the same thing. So I tried it. There I was with my car jacked up, parts all over the place, and no clue how to proceed.

I had to call my brother and get him to put it back together for me. He warned me, never try this again! And I have not.

My warning is, if you don't have mechanical ability, stay away, far away, from trying to work on your vehicle. Especially brakes since they are one of the most important systems on a car.

BTW, I won't even change wiper blades. I buy them at Auto Zone and let the folks there install them for me!
 




amd2800barton

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Its fine if you want to pay to have your service done for you, but on a forum people will discuss how much that service costs. Its always good to know how much time a service should take, and what parts would cost. Look to the DIYers to find out how much time it would take you to do it on your own, and compare that to how long your service provider claims.

Lets say your dealer says doing the rear brakes will cost $240 for parts, and $160 in labor (what the OP said their service cost) for the two rear brakes. You can get those parts at autozone for about eighty bucks less, which means that the dealer is charging a 50% markup for parts. A DIYer says that an average person could do the same job in about an hour with inexpensive tools most people already have. This means that for the dealer to do your service, you are paying ~$240 to the dealer instead of taking an hour of your time (and learning a few very basic skills).

:eek:
 




EGUY4

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I learn a great deal on this site from the comments and experience others have had with their Explorer, and I never took offense to anything I ever read.
 




aznkidlee

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City, State
MA
Year, Model & Trim Level
12 Explorer XLT BLK 205A
I have about 42350 and I had my rear rotors and pads replaced. Per the tech, the fronts are fine.

Rotors: 166.60
Pads 66.63
Solvent: 6.99
Environmental fee: 9.99
Labor: 150
Sales Tax: 15.01
Total cost: $415.22
Total cost: $390.22 (After Ford $25 Rebate)

I called Midas around my area and was quoted $380+ taxes.

I agree it is cheaper for DIYers but up here in Boston we have about 3 to 4 feet of snow depending where you are, single digits and I don't have a garage to work on my car. The price feels reasonable to me.
 




new to ford

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Rochester Hills, MI
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11XLT202A 17Sport401A
our explorer needs rear pads/rotors.
I am doing it myself with the following costs with tax:
Four pads: $66.00
Two rotors: $170.00
 




mikepier

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Long Island, NY
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99 XLT
15 XL
our explorer needs rear pads/rotors.
I am doing it myself with the following costs with tax:
Four pads: $66.00
Two rotors: $170.00

Are these OEM parts? Seems pricey. Where are you getting it from, dealer?

RockAuto has them for a lot cheaper.
 




sobsmb

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City, State
Cincinnati, OH
Year, Model & Trim Level
2013 Explorer XLT
I just did mine (32k miles) for about $275:

~$75 for Pads (front & rear)
~$200 for Rotors (front & rear)
All Raybestos Advanced

Did them myself, took most of the day, but cleaned everything really good, installed mud flaps, found some hidden mud/dirt that took a while to clean out, Food, BSing around, etc.

Funny part was all the lugs where torqued to well over 150 ft/lbs when I removed them (not really sure, but I know it was over 100) so that was fun, and the tires where seized onto the rotors and the rotors seized onto the hubs so that took a good bit and a sledge hammer to get off.

If you wonder why I did them so soon, I have a few reasons.

1. 30k (1 year lease) from previous owner and I know they towed and traveled.
2. The last foot of stopping seamed to grind/slip (its hard to explain) [no longer does this]
3. Driving family to Disney this summer and want to make sure I'm good to go.
4. Fresh Start
 




dco43054

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City, State
cmh
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20 XLT
Did my rear pads and rotors this afternoon.

Don't forget to ask for the loaner tool so you can wind the rear pistons back into the calipers.

It was too easy to do. The worst part was the torx bolt that holds the rear rotors on. The first one came out easily. The second one started to chew the head off as I removed it. I tapped my torx bit in with my hammer and was able to remove it without drama by holding lots of pressure on the ratchet. I didn't put it back in. Don't know if I will worry about replacing it. Once the wheel is bolted on, it holds the rotor in tightly.
 




BAMeyer

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2011 Explorer Limited
A Bit Confused

Did my rear pads and rotors this afternoon.

Don't forget to ask for the loaner tool so you can wind the rear pistons back into the calipers.

It was too easy to do. The worst part was the torx bolt that holds the caliper on. The first one came out easily. The second one started to chew the head off as I removed it. I tapped my torx bit in with my hammer and was able to remove it without drama by holding lots of pressure on the ratchet. I didn't put it back in. Don't know if I will worry about replacing it. Once the wheel is bolted on, it holds the rotor in tightly.

I am a bit confused--did you mean that you left out a bolt that bolts the caliper in place? Or did you mean that the torx head bolts hold the ROTOR in place? Wouldn't a caliper bolt left out allow the caliper to be insufficiently held and cause a big problem?
 




dco43054

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I am a bit confused--did you mean that you left out a bolt that bolts the caliper in place? Or did you mean that the torx head bolts hold the ROTOR in place? Wouldn't a caliper bolt left out allow the caliper to be insufficiently held and cause a big problem?
Ooooops. Sorry, meant the torx bolt in the rotor. I'll fix that.
 




HamHands

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Atlanta, GA
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2015 Ford Explorer Sport
Thought this would be helpful for current owners with future maintenance plans:

With +98,000 miles, I needed new rear brakes. Fronts were fine. I thought that was strange, but apparently our traction control system uses up the rear brakes.

So, for 2 rear rotors, 2 rear pads, labor and parts, the total was $419.89 . Not too bad.

Rotors are $89.96 each. Pads are $59.97 for the pair, and $180.00 for labor.

So you're saying you have 98K miles on your front brakes and they are fine??? The front brakes have never been changed; is that what you're saying??? Damn, that has to be a record. Are you the original owner???

I do all our brakes, rotors, caliper swaps, etc in our house. For a Stealership though you didn't get bent over too bad. I only buy American and because so I don't have to source components from the dealer like I would say for a BMW or Mercedes... So quality in-spec parts are relatively cheap. I can do 4 new rotors and very nice pads for under $200 in under 3 hours of labor & taking my darn sweet time. I just like the peace of mind knowing things are done right without a new door ding or scratch after every time a shop monkey touches my vehicle... YMMV...
 




HamHands

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So the dealer replaced the rotors. The originals were so badly warped that they tried machining them twice and they were still warped.

Driving home they felt really good but after about 15 minutes in bumper to bumper traffic I started getting some squealing and chatter. The squealing is new, but I can assume that is the pads trying to seat to the new rotors. The chatter however is the same noise I had before.

I wonder if the problem is the pads or calipers. I asked them to double check that the pads were ok, and that I'd pay to replace them but they assured me the pads were fine.

I'm contemplating just replacing the pads myself at this point. I'm no stranger to doing brake jobs but just didn't want to still have a problem after and they try to blame some caliper issue on my new pad installation.

After a brake pad swap and rotor replacement or a turn there is a brake bedding procedure that should be done EVERY TIME... It consists of 10-15 medium to hard stops; 45-55mph to a complete stop. This beds the brake pads properly to the rotors. I'm 98% sure the dealership didn't do that for you. If after a day of driving the brakes feel funny, take it back...

Edit to add: I just noticed the Stealership replaced your rotors and NOT the pads, how freaking stupid! What a horrible service department!
 




Bill #5 Explorer

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2016 Explorer XLT
So you're saying you have 98K miles on your front brakes and they are fine??? The front brakes have never been changed; is that what you're saying??? Damn, that has to be a record. Are you the original owner???

Yes, that's what I am saying. Original and only owner. Fronts were done at just under 110,000 miles. Just under $400. Truck now has 143,000 miles. Going strong.
 




HamHands

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Yes, that's what I am saying. Original and only owner. Fronts were done at just under 110,000 miles. Just under $400. Truck now has 143,000 miles. Going strong.

I believe you bro... Damn that is a lot of miles to go with the front brakes lasting though. I guess I'm just old school and change them every 4 years/40,000 miles or earlier if there is not enough meat on them. I like to change them myself, personal habit. I HATE when anyone but me works on my vehicle's. I'll be looking/measuring the rear pads very thoroughly when I rotate tires in 8-10K... I just turned 450 miles on the odometer. This 5th generation Explorer is the first vehicle I've ever heard of that wears the rear brakes out before the fronts. Usually, the rear brakes last more than twice as long as the front's do... At least they do/did on my (2) Taurus SHO's, my Jeep Wrangler, the wifey's 4Runner and Avalon.
 




TommyBoy2011

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So, watching a youtube video on the explorer's rear brakes, there is apparently a rust issue with the caliper bracket not allowing the pads to slide, thus causing the uneven wear. Did you guys address this? Also did you put anti seize compound on both sides of the brake pad clips?
 




TommyBoy2011

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I believe you bro... Damn that is a lot of miles to go with the front brakes lasting though. I guess I'm just old school and change them every 4 years/40,000 miles or earlier if there is not enough meat on them. I like to change them myself, personal habit. I HATE when anyone but me works on my vehicle's. I'll be looking/measuring the rear pads very thoroughly when I rotate tires in 8-10K... I just turned 450 miles on the odometer. This 5th generation Explorer is the first vehicle I've ever heard of that wears the rear brakes out before the fronts. Usually, the rear brakes last more than twice as long as the front's do... At least they do/did on my (2) Taurus SHO's, my Jeep Wrangler, the wifey's 4Runner and Avalon.

60K on our Ex and the fronts look to be only half way worn. Amazing with how heavy my wife is with the accelerator and brake pedals. The backs are only heavily worn on the inside pads, the outsides look to have more than half left too.
 




182RG

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The thing is, I have no idea how you think replacing brakes on a vehicle is an easy job. It is not! And telling people ANYONE can do it is inviting them to have problems.

Disc brake pad and rotor replacement / resurfacing is a relatively easy job. 3 or 4 on a scale of 10. With the vast amount of Internet resources available (YouTube, How-To's, etc.), it is far easier than when your only resource was a Chiltons book from the book store. Add a large "C" clamp to his tools list.
 




HamHands

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2015 Ford Explorer Sport
So, watching a youtube video on the explorer's rear brakes, there is apparently a rust issue with the caliper bracket not allowing the pads to slide, thus causing the uneven wear. Did you guys address this? Also did you put anti seize compound on both sides of the brake pad clips?



I haven't had to change mine yet because I bought a new 15' Sport on Monday. If I hear or feel any rear dragging ass pads then I will replace them, along with the rotors, and use generous amounts of the nickel based anti-seize on the caliper brackets. I might just do it anyway to ease my mind when I rotate the tires at 8-10K... If you live in the "Rust Belt" and have more than 20K on your Explorer, I'd plan to free up 2-3 hours on a Saturday morning to perform some preventative maintenance for peace of mind...
 


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BAMeyer

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A friend and I changed out front and rear pads yesterday. I replaced the front rotors but retained the rears. Getting the rears' caliper pistons wound in was a chore but all went well. I bought this vehicle with 28K Miles. Dealer did first oil change and tire rotation. I've done oil changes and rotations since and always looked at brake pads quality. Funny thing is, pads front and rear have not worn a heck of a lot from when I bought it (now with 66K Miles) and could have gone another 15K Miles easily--or more! I think how a vehicle is driven makes a difference. We do a lot of freeway driving and try to back-off early and signal early and ease into the brake pedal, often applying brakes several times before stop. I am 67 and cars behind me see that third brake light several times and that gives them time to stop texting and watch the road! Regards,,,,BAMeyer
 




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