How to: - SOHC PCV Valve Mod thru 2000 | Ford Explorer Forums - Serious Explorations

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How to: SOHC PCV Valve Mod thru 2000

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2000StreetRod

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Joined
May 26, 2009
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City, State
Greenville, SC
Year, Model & Trim Level
00 Sport FI, 03 Ltd V8
Ford recommends changing the PCV valve every 100,000 miles. My Sport has 151,000 miles and I suspected it had the original valve. In my defense, I have only put about 1,000 miles on the vehicle since I purchased it this May. I have been experiencing a loping and rough idle (symptoms of a plugged or restricted PCV valve) for several months (since changing to a high flow air filter) and decided it was time to swap the valve. Having read other forum members' accounts of the difficulty of finding and changing the valve I dreaded the activity.

Identifed in the photo below is the PCV valve that is centrally located between the firewall and the lower rear of the upper intake manifold.
VALVE.JPG

While it is not visible in the photo, directly above the valve is a nonsymmetrical "T" fitting that is attached to two hoses going in opposite directions to different ports on the upper intake manifold. Crankcase fumes flow up thru the PCV valve and into the intake manifold to be burned in the cylinders. The photo below shows the hose that connects to the port in the left (driver) side of the intake manifold. There is a similar arrangement on the right side.
PCVTUBEL.JPG

Knowing that it would be difficult to remove the PCV valve, I disconnected the hose connection at each intake port and moved the cruise control cable out of the way. I noticed the remains of a plastic fastener that at one time had held the PCV valve in its intended position. From the passenger side with my left hand I grasped the flared rubber hose end attached to the base of the valve. With my right hand I grasped the "T" and attached hoses. I then twisted, rocked from side to side and pulled until something came apart. Unfortunately, the "T" separated from the top of the valve and the valve remained attached to the flared rubber hose end. I inspected the "T" with hoses assembly shown in the photo below.
PCVOASY1.JPG

The hose in the area between the red arrows was flattened significantly due to being taught against the rear of the intake manifold. While it's not visible in the photo, there were significant indentations in the hose at the location marked by the green arrow. The photo below is a top view of the "T" and hose assembly (ignore the PCV valve) which came later.
PCVOASY2.JPG

There was significant abrasion damage on the hose at the identified location. While neither hose appeared to leak or be blocked from the damage, I decided hose replacement was warranted.
 



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Removing the valve

I resumed my attempt to remove the valve from the flared hose end. I tried prying down along the side with a very small flat screw driver but the lip on the valve blocked the screw driver blade. I tried spraying the lower part of the valve with WD40 hoping it would penetrate the edge. The location and size of the valve made it very difficult to grip tightly enough the loosen. Finally I decided that more leverage was required. The photo below shows a locking plier (ViseGrip) attached to the upper half of the valve. Since the valve is plastic and easily broken I was careful to grasp the valve where it is strongest (see photo below) using only enough pressure to prevent slipping.
VGRIPS.JPG

I grasped the lower hose flare with my left hand and resumed twisting and rocking but my hand grip was not tight enough to prevent slipping. Eventually I resorted to attaching another locking plier at the location identified with the arrow. I used just enough pressure to keep the flared end from slipping while twisting and the valve finally moved. Then I rocked the valve from side to side while pulling gradually working the valve free.
Indicated in the photo below are the remnants of the valve holder.
HOLDER.JPG

I decided that the new valve could be held in position with a cable tie if needed.
The photo below shows the old plastic valve and the new metal valve.
PCVVON.JPG

While there was considerable accumulation of crud in the old valve it still blocked air flow in one direction and allowed air flow in the opposite direction. Based on the lack of oil residue in the top of the valve and the connecting hoses I decided that a catch can (oil separator) was not warranted. The location to grasp the valve with locking plier is indicated in the photo below.
PCVVON2.JPG
 






Raising the "T"

I decided that the observed hose deterioration was due to being too taught and to contact with sharp edges. The red arrow in the photo below points to where in the stock configuration the right hose is in contact with a metal bracket.
PCVV.JPG

The green arrow points to the remnants of the PCV valve clamp. Also, with both hoses sloped toward the PCV valve, any oil vapor left in the hoses when the engine stops will condense and pool on top of the closed valve. This contributes to the valve sticking and restricting air flow. I decided to raise the "T" connection to eliminate physical contact with the bracket and to reduce oil pooling on top of the valve. The photo below shows the components for the modified PCV valve assembly.
PCVPARTS.JPG

The hoses are cut from 3/8 inch inside diameter transmission hose that I had on hand. The short section of tube with a flare at each end is from transmission tubing that I cut out when performing my oil coolers/remote filters modification http://www.explorerforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=247990. Only one flare is needed to get a good seal at the bottom of the "T" that has been stretched by the top of the PCV valve. A section of an old fuel filter would work just as well. The photo below shows the PCV valve assembly prior to installation. The arrow marks where I added a small hose clamp for a tight fit.
PCVNASY.JPG
 






Installed new assembly

The photo below shows the left side of the new PCV valve assembly after installation.
PCVNASYL.JPG

The hose length was cut to fit so that it was loose around the back of the upper intake manifold but not touching the firewall. Note that the hose is routed below the intake manifold to brake booster hose.
The photo below shows the right side of the new assembly.
PCVNASYR.JPG

The red arrow marks where the hose is attached to the port on the right section of the upper intake manifold. The green arrow points to the clearance between the hose and the support bracket. Because the hoses kept the PCV valve in position, I decided a cable tie was not needed.
 






Did this help your idle at all? and where did you get your PCV valve? I have 115k on mine, so i would assume as well that mine is original, and i'm having an idle problem, and a PCV will be cheaper then the plug wires and coil pack for at least now.

Thanks,
Justin
 






Nice write up!
 






PCV valve source

Did this help your idle at all? and where did you get your PCV valve? I have 115k on mine, so i would assume as well that mine is original, and i'm having an idle problem, and a PCV will be cheaper then the plug wires and coil pack for at least now.
Thanks,
Justin

I bought the valve at Advance Auto Parts for less than $3. I just told them what year, make, model, engine (E) and they pulled one from their stock. No, replacing the valve didn't help my idle because the stock valve was not stuck or blocked and the hoses (though deteriorated) had no leaks. My idle problems did not start until I went to a racing air filter. I suspect that the increased air flow at idle exceeds the limits of the PCM/IAC valve. As a matter of fact, the first few times I started the engine with the new air filter the CEL was illuminated. It even happened a couple times after disconnecting and reconnecting the battery. I probably need a custom tune but I'm trying things that should be done anyway before resorting to a tune. In the next few days I'll replace the fuel filter and then add a bottle of Techron to the fuel tank. Many years ago it was the only injector cleaner approved for use in my Volvos. After that I'll pull the spark plugs and look for abnormalities.
 






that was the best write up I have ever read here. Nice job.

I too replaced the hoses, but did not do the PVC extension like you did. I also did not use the clamp, and it seems to be fine, altho I might check it now since you puit the question I may have a leak into my head
 






As an efi tuner, I can tell you that the K&N air filter itself will not require you to get a custom tune. But it can possibly be a problem... if the filter is over oiled, that oil will find its way into the mass air meter, and get on the hot wire. There, it will insulate the hot wire from air flowing across it, and mess up the tune. The airflow meter is the main sensor that controls air/fuel ratio, so having it dirty or oily is a huge problem.

If you pull the air box lid and reach into the beginning of the air intake tubing and find an oily residue, that's a strong indication that oil was headed for the meter.

Aside from that, the air filter simply lets more air get to the meter easier, but it's still metered correctly. Therefore, no tune needed. Now a cold air kit that changes the tubing shape or diameter is a different story.

You need to pull the codes using a domestic enhanced scan tool and see what's really going on.
 






Pontisteve is correct

I agree that my idle problems were not due to reduced airflow restriction provided by the Akimoto Racing air filter. When I read the DTCs associated with the CEL they were lean conditions on banks 1 & 2. As I recall a contaminated MAF sensor (from air filter oil) causes a rich condition at idle and a lean condition at high engine speeds. My lean condition was a result of leaking intake manifold (upper and lower) gaskets coincident with cooler morning temperatures. I replaced the gaskets correcting the mixture problem.
 






My friend is a driveability tech at Ford. He explained to me that the best way to find intake leaks is to datalog STFT's when the vehicle is first fired up cold. (It will take a little while for the stfts to become active, since the O2s need about 30 seconds or more to warm up and start working). He says if you find large STFT's when cold, which get smaller as the engine warms, suspect intake gasket leaks and verify by spraying the suspected leaking surfaces with brakleen (the flammable kind) to see if engine revs up.

The idea is that the cold manifold will have a larger intake leak, which as the motor warms and things expand, the leak gets smaller. This does work pretty good. The car has to be exhaust leak-free though, because air leaked into the exhaust can fool the O2s as well.
 






Thanks a ton 2000 street rod! I have looked and looked for the pcv with no luck. Your writeup made changing it a breese. Thanks again for takin the time.:salute:
 






How many miles on it before it developed intake gasket leaks?
 












2000StreetRod
SOHC PCV Valve Mod thru 2000

Thanks very much for your write up. I could not find my PCV valve for the life of me but your info and Pics were great.
Im just starting work on my 2000 SOHC 4.0 and really enjoy this site will start Mods soon.
thanks again
 






PCV removal (a little bit easier)

I've been doing it this way for a long time and have big arms and little patients.

explorer009.jpg

Look below for image

Area Of Insertion (PCM wire harness dismounted to provide factory approved 'wiggle room').

http://img846.imageshack.us/i/explorer010.jpg/

Meat Hook in Place

explorer008.jpg

Look below for image

For clarity I removed my arm

Now what you do is push the pry bar down between the bracket holding the EGR solenoid and manifold just behind the passenger side runner. You will have to also get the bar to go between the fuel rail back there and the manifold. With hand inserted and pry bar in position. Place bar (with some figure manipulation) on top of rubber line place index and middle figure below hose with thumb on top just touching the pry bar. No use the bar and index/middle figure to gently rock up and down and if possible side to side. Now apply some backward force with your thumb and pry bar. This method is guaranteed to not break the fragile bib on the lower manifold (unless you do it, then I take no responsibility).

The bib is at a perpendicular orientation to you as you stand at the side of the vehicle and just pulling up will in some cases break the bib along a molding line at the bottom causing a leak.

When installing your new PCV route the lower hose behind the fuel rail as this is also a contact point and can wear through the hose. As far as installing the new hose just push really hard and make sure your lined up with the bib.

I do commend Streetrod for his modification as the bracket is also a nasty contact point. But my method when try once usually frees the PCV in distress in under a minute. Flat rate will bring about great ideas.
 












Ford recommends changing the PCV valve every 100,000 miles. My Sport has 151,000 miles and I suspected it had the original valve. In my defense, I have only put about 1,000 miles on the vehicle since I purchased it this May. I have been experiencing a loping and rough idle (symptoms of a plugged or restricted PCV valve) for several months (since changing to a high flow air filter) and decided it was time to swap the valve. Having read other forum members' accounts of the difficulty of finding and changing the valve I dreaded the activity.

Identifed in the photo below is the PCV valve that is centrally located between the firewall and the lower rear of the upper intake manifold.
View attachment 56518
While it is not visible in the photo, directly above the valve is a nonsymmetrical "T" fitting that is attached to two hoses going in opposite directions to different ports on the upper intake manifold. Crankcase fumes flow up thru the PCV valve and into the intake manifold to be burned in the cylinders. The photo below shows the hose that connects to the port in the left (driver) side of the intake manifold. There is a similar arrangement on the right side.
View attachment 56519
Knowing that it would be difficult to remove the PCV valve, I disconnected the hose connection at each intake port and moved the cruise control cable out of the way. I noticed the remains of a plastic fastener that at one time had held the PCV valve in its intended position. From the passenger side with my left hand I grasped the flared rubber hose end attached to the base of the valve. With my right hand I grasped the "T" and attached hoses. I then twisted, rocked from side to side and pulled until something came apart. Unfortunately, the "T" separated from the top of the valve and the valve remained attached to the flared rubber hose end. I inspected the "T" with hoses assembly shown in the photo below.
View attachment 56520
The hose in the area between the red arrows was flattened significantly due to being taught against the rear of the intake manifold. While it's not visible in the photo, there were significant indentations in the hose at the location marked by the green arrow. The photo below is a top view of the "T" and hose assembly (ignore the PCV valve) which came later.
View attachment 56521
There was significant abrasion damage on the hose at the identified location. While neither hose appeared to leak or be blocked from the damage, I decided hose replacement was warranted.

What type of car is this you are working on? Mine is a 2001 Ford Explorer Sport (NOT SPORT TRACK) but I have the same setup as you do and even the ford sight is telling me I dont have that part but I do! so Im wondering what is up with ford, do they just play switch parts to screw with peoples heads?
 






PCV replacement for 2001 J1 ST

The photo below shows the left side of the new PCV valve assembly after installation.
View attachment 56531
The hose length was cut to fit so that it was loose around the back of the upper intake manifold but not touching the firewall. Note that the hose is routed below the intake manifold to brake booster hose.
The photo below shows the right side of the new assembly.
View attachment 56532
The red arrow marks where the hose is attached to the port on the right section of the upper intake manifold. The green arrow points to the clearance between the hose and the support bracket. Because the hoses kept the PCV valve in position, I decided a cable tie was not needed.

Before I saw your mod, I bought the OEM PCV/hose assembly for $30. So before I dismantle a perfectly good assembly to do your mod, I want to try and replace the whole assembly. Any idea how to get at the bottom hose where it attaches to the case? The top two hoses off the T are easy enough to get at, but that bottom flared hose that holds the PCV valve looks like a bear...
 



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