The truth about fluid changes, and flushes from an independent shop owner. | Ford Explorer Forums - Serious Explorations

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The truth about fluid changes, and flushes from an independent shop owner.




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Wow, good article. :thumbsup:
 






Excellent article. I fully agree with everything he stated.
 






I truly agree with:
"If an oil system is dirty enough to have deposits of sludge forming, your only going to get the sludge out by removing the valve covers and oil pan and scraping it out. Any stirring up of the stuff without removing it is likely to do more harm than good."
But I will add that this pertains to trannys too.
________________
I firmly "DISAGREE" that years ago the only way to change the tranny fluid was to remove the pan and drain what was in the pan.
That statement is NOT true.
Years ago we dropped the pan AND took the drain plug out of the converter making it possible to do a pretty good tranny fluid change.
_______________
Other wise a great post by that mechanic.
 






Good article. I've always wondered about the breaks though. But like he said, is a sealed system, so how would water be introduced into it?
 












Maybe with condensation?

Thatd be my best guess. Good reading thou. I will never go to some place like "quick lube" just because I know they are doing a cheap service.
 






Good article. I've always wondered about the breaks though. But like he said, is a sealed system, so how would water be introduced into it?
Over time, brake fluid breaks down due to heat. How long it lasts depends on what vehicle, how you drive, what you tow, how you stop etc. etc. It usually stays put, as in the boiled fluid in your calipers can be bled out quickly without having to flush the entire system. I agree that a brake flush is not needed 95% of the time, however go look at a very high mileage vehicle that has never had the brake fluid "changed". It will be very dark like iced tea. You can flush the fluid on a vehicle like this and it will improve braking performance tenfold.

Good article. :thumbsup:
 






Brake fluid, due to its very hygroscopic nature, gets a little moisture in it every time you open the master cylinder to check the level.
 






You can flush the fluid on a vehicle like this and it will improve braking performance tenfold.

:


That is a huge reason right there.
I flushed mine about 70k and the differance was night and day. Okay maybe not night and day but more like , mid aftrenoon and early evening but there was a differance.
 






This article is right on the mark. In fact it was a bad experience with a quick-lube tech trying to convince me I needed to flush my tranny and rear diff that made me start looking under my truck in the first place. Then I figured out I could fix/flush most stuff by myself anyway and just avoid the hassle of dealing with those guys.

The article also answers another question for me 'cause I was looking for an honest shop for my sister to use in the Alexandria, VA area.
 












Tell the owner that you read his article, and was very impressed with what he wrote. Write a review about his shop after you use him. Don't forget to tell him about this website!

Yeah !!! What he said.
 






Over time, brake fluid breaks down due to heat. How long it lasts depends on what vehicle, how you drive, what you tow, how you stop etc. etc. It usually stays put, as in the boiled fluid in your calipers can be bled out quickly without having to flush the entire system. I agree that a brake flush is not needed 95% of the time, however go look at a very high mileage vehicle that has never had the brake fluid "changed". It will be very dark like iced tea. You can flush the fluid on a vehicle like this and it will improve braking performance tenfold.

Good article. :thumbsup:

Depends on the car. I changed the original fluid in my 94 X with brand new Castrol LMA dot4. I didn't notice a bit of difference. The fluid was dark though.

I agree with that writeup. Even dealers are doing it now. I had my Acura in for an oil change(just cause I had a cheap coupon, I go to a local place other wise) They come back & tell me I need a brake flush & I should change my tranny fluid. I was like yeah ok, no thanks. I changed my brake fluid a few months back when I put my new brakes on, & the tranny is a manual. The car only had 52K on it.
Pissed me off big time. Treating me like some noob. I could run circles around these guys that work there.
 






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