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Transmission cooler line connection dilem

DFully

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2006 4.6L Eddie Bauer
I own a 2006 4.6L 3 Valve explorer with the 6R60 transmission, recently my radiator cracked along the top of the plastic causing a substantial leak. Now radiators are sold out ado the wait time is pretty good amount of time not having any wheels. I unfortunately could not wait the required time to stick with the Motorcraft radiator so instead I ordered the mishimoto OEM direct replacement with the lifetime warranty. I’ve used the warranty once already due to the shipping being so roughly handled the radiator was bent and leaked out before I even installed it so I waited another 3 weeks to get the replacement and after installing it everything was great ran good as new but after a few hundred miles I noticed a fairly small leak, I investigated further and I soon found out the leak was no longer a small one but a rather moderate and growing one. The leak I was able to diagnose as the transmission cooler line connector on the driver side was the culprit and after some research I found that the mishimoto radiators use the same cheap connectors as most of the non Motorcraft radiators use with only one o-ring located inside rather than two. My question is if I buy the dorman replacement will the thread size fit the mishimoto or how do I fix this dilemma? And to flush the intercooler what all is required since I’ll have to drain both coolant and the intercooler in order to properly install the dorman replacement?
 


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Mbrooks420

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Members have had issues with the Dorman radiator parts. I’d go somewhere that makes hydraulic hoses.or a transmission shop. They should be able to match up anything you need.
 




Bazz270

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you can reuse your old trans line OEM fitting with new fresh orings.

since there is no any pipe crimp tools needed in GEN4 radiator side fittings and they all are threaded

motorcraft/ford parts sell this fittings and repair kits separated from the whole radiator assy..you just need to find the right one OEM fitting.
 




DFully

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Okay but when you do get the right fittings how do I go about draining the intercooler so that coolant doesn’t get contaminated with transmission fluid or vice versa? Do I have to drain the coolant as well to swixb out the fitting f? My dad already took my original radiator to the dump so getting those fitting me off are no lnger an option but I definitely need the right one cause I can’t afford to lose anymore transmission fluid or coolant, my pocket book is taxed to the max and i don’t have another fro to the auto parts store in me again so thanks again all help is much appreciated
 




Bazz270

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And you see your fluids contaminated right now?

Anyway

if it any chance for fluids to mix you will have to flush both engine and trans lines.
 




Mbrooks420

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Tranny fluid in the coolant isn’t a huge deal. ANY coolant in the trans fluid is a death sentence for that transmission. They aren’t going to mix just swapping the radiator, or transmission cooler fittings.
 




CDW6212R

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Ditto, it's super rare for the ATF cooler inside the radiator to fail, lix fluids etc.

You have a new radiator, part of installing one is verifying that everything matches, that the line fittings are correct etc. You should always keep the old parts until you know the new ones and repair are done and successful. This is a learning experience, you probably won't throw away the old parts again without checking everything.

FYI, the normal ATF lines have an o-ring in the connection fitting, those are wear parts and usually need to be replaced.
I wonder if all you need is a proper new o-ring. Are you sure that the fittings are different? They shouldn't be tightened together if they do not match, that can damage them.
 




Bazz270

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Cheap Gen4 radiators equipped with the old design single O-rings seal threaded fitting (instead of the quality and OEM parts equipped with two trans line inlet O-rings)
 




CDW6212R

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Cheap Gen4 radiators equipped with the old design single O-rings seal threaded fitting (instead of the quality and OEM parts equipped with two trans line inlet O-rings)

Yes sure, but was the o-ring replaced? Those will almost always leak if they are left in there, or left out(they degrade over time). I have replaced all four pairs of those in my 2nd gen trucks, which use the old design. They work great, when they have a good proper o-ring in them. I discovered the need for the o-rings in older Fords myself.

I had an 86 Crown Vic P71 that I made trans lines for, to include a huge engine cooler for the trans. I did great to make them and not include any rubber hoses, just easy to come by steel fuel lines from the parts store. In the end, about half of the fittings leaked, those flare nut fittings aren't ideal for high pressure fluid. I thought of installing o-rings into the fittings, after tightening them a ton. The o-rings required very little torque on the fittings to keep them from leaking. They never leaked after that, although the used cooler did about nine years later.

I did that in about 1991, and I've done that many times since then, on all trans fittings that have the flared connection. That's old knowledge, and I wasn't the first to do it. The OEM's have learned it to over the years, and obviously they have upgraded more also. Fine, but prior fittings Ford used were terrible because they made them to flex in the connection, and those always developed leaks. The answer for those to was to change the fitting on the radiator, to the fixed style, and again use an o-ring in the fitting.
 




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