U-Haul: Driving With Rented Risk. | Ford Explorer Forums - Serious Explorations

  • Register Today It's free!

U-Haul: Driving With Rented Risk.

cybergasm

Explorer Addict
Joined
January 8, 2006
Messages
6,421
Reaction score
20
City, State
Humboldt Ks
Year, Model & Trim Level
1997 Mountaineer 5.0
I know this thorny subject has been touch before but last Sundays edition of the Los Angeles Time had part one of the results of 1 year long investigation into U Haul focusing on their trailers and the problems with em from lack maintenance and even U haul backing away from their policies to employees who didn't read a manual before renting trailers to people. Yup even the Ford Explorer is mentioned in the story. The full story and interactive stuff is located here:

www.latimes.com/uhaul
 



Join the Elite Explorers for $20 each year.
Elite Explorer members see no advertisements, no banner ads, no double underlined links,.
Add an avatar, upload photo attachments, and more!
.





While I have no doubt that U-Haul is probably spotty on the up kept of their equipment I think most of the accidents is the renters fault. Most people have no business towing a trailer. Most people can't even really truly handle just a vehicle let alone towing a trailer.
 






Wow. I can see this company going down once stories like this begin to circulate. When public safety is involved, people will listen.
 






"This company is the most miserable company I have ever had the misfortune of being involved with,"

For me, its a tossup between U-Haul and Pac Bell/SBC/AT&T. They both tried to charge me for something they shouldn't have.

Stupidity is deeply ingrained into the U-Haul organization from the top down. Rick posted a link to a revealing article about how screwed up the family who owns U-Haul is. Its in the massive multi page U-Haul thread if you want to read it.

I'm truly amazed that they are still in business.
 






That article is right in a lot of aspects. I recently used a U-haul tow dolly to tow a friends overheating 02 Volvo S40 behind a 00 Cherokee. The dolly would sway so bad over 50 that I had to steer against it or it would turn the Cherokee. Thankfully we only had to go like 15 miles.

That was the first time I've used a tow dolly. Do they all do this or was it just the u-haul special?
 






The dolly would sway so bad over 50 that I had to steer against it or it would turn the Cherokee. Thankfully we only had to go like 15 miles.

That was the first time I've used a tow dolly. Do they all do this or was it just the u-haul special?

Bad trailer sway is usually caused by not having enough weight on the hitch. You should have about 11 - 15% of the total weight that you are towing on the hitch. This may be difficult to do with a car dolly.

Did the people at U-Haul give you any instructions on how to load the car? Any advice at all? That is one of the issues noted in the article.
 






Bad trailer sway is usually caused by not having enough weight on the hitch. You should have about 11 - 15% of the total weight that you are towing on the hitch. This may be difficult to do with a car dolly.

Did the people at U-Haul give you any instructions on how to load the car? Any advice at all? That is one of the issues noted in the article.

No I don't even think they asked what I was towing. The front tires of the S40 were on the dolly. Would have been impossible to get more weight than the engine up front. From what I can find online the heep only weights 200 lbs more than the S40 which is another u-haul safety violation.

I would NEVER use one of those dollys long distance. I couldn't believe it didn't have brakes. Had to stop halfway through the 15 mile trip and let the brakes cool cause I didn't like smell coming off the heep front brakes. Granted it was a windy mountain road but damn.
 






WOW! After reading that article, I have to believe that Joe Shoen might be one of the top 10 sleaziest businessman of all time. And considering his dad's "dumb ****" memo, you can see where he got it from.

I'll be the first to point out that a lot of crashes occur because people are driving HUA and the severe injuries that happen often occur because people are unrestrained, but U-Haul has to be one of the most irresponsible companies on the planet. One of my best friends is moving soon and I am forwarding this article to her to make sure she does not rent from U-Haul.
 






I would NEVER use one of those dollys long distance. I couldn't believe it didn't have brakes. Had to stop halfway through the 15 mile trip and let the brakes cool cause I didn't like smell coming off the heep front brakes. Granted it was a windy mountain road but damn.

I know that they make a device that you can add to the towed vehicle so that the brakes are activated when the tow vehicle brakes are on. They are marketed for RV people who tow a "dinghy" behind a motorhome.

http://www.campingworld.com/browse/...-Braking-System/deptID=5:skunum=33933:src=FPC

I think if you are towing a dolly without brakes and you can't get the 11-15% on the hitch, then you just need to go slow to your destination.
 






I found an Owner's Manual for a Roadmaster Tow Dolly here:

http://roadmasterinc.com/support/manuals.html

Go down to the bottom for the PDF manual link

A couple of things that U-Haul should have mentioned:

The motorhome (towing vehicle) must be at least 1,000 pounds heavier than the towed vehicle.
If not, the momentum of the towed car and dolly will attempt to push the
motorhome resulting in fishtailing or jack-knifing. This force can easily cause a loss of control that can result in severe damage or a life threatening accident.

Do not pull more than 4,380 pounds with the tow dolly. Remember to add the weight of all contents within the towed car when calculating its total weight.

Check Trailer Ball Height
Make sure that your trailer ball height is 18 inches plus or minus 1 inch. Ball heights outside of this range can create poor towing characteristics
such as sway and fishtailing. In addition, incorrect ball height can
cause the ramps to damage the bottom of the towed car or drag on
the road over bumps and dips. Coupler requires a 2 inch hitch ball with
a 5,000 lb. capacity.

Towing
Warning! Motorhome, dolly, and towed car will take significantly longer
to accelerate and pass other vehicles. Stopping distances may be
greatly increased. Compensate accordingly.
If the tow dolly sways or fishtails while towing, bring the motorhome to a
slow controlled stop. Each of the following items can cause or contribute
to vehicle sway: Towing a vehicle backwards, excessive weight in rear of
vehicle, insufficient tire pressures, damaged rims or wheel bearings,
excessive speeds, unlocked steering wheel. Additionally, the towed car's
wheels must be straight and square with the dolly. Warning! Towing a
vehicle that excessively sways may cause loss of control resulting in
property damage, severe injury, or even death.
 






i towed a 6x12 UHAUL trailer for 17 hours. i tell you that it sway so bad sometimes that it scared the **** out of me, but i was towing it with a stock explorer at 55mph.

i towed explorers behind pick up trucks(f-150,silveradoetc) using a UHAUL tow dolly from 55mph till 70mph and no sway, nothing.i could fill it only in very steep hills and under braking.

my opinion is to tow a car you need to tow it with something heavy. is not UHAULS fault if they tow cars with light SUV'S at 60mph instead of 45(recomended speed).
 






I know that they make a device that you can add to the towed vehicle so that the brakes are activated when the tow vehicle brakes are on. They are marketed for RV people who tow a "dinghy" behind a motorhome.

http://www.campingworld.com/browse/...-Braking-System/deptID=5:skunum=33933:src=FPC

I think if you are towing a dolly without brakes and you can't get the 11-15% on the hitch, then you just need to go slow to your destination.

There is a similar product called the "Brake Buddy" that my parents used when towing a Jeep Wrangler with their RV. It was a PITA to set up the brake bias properly (about 30 minutes of me riding in the Jeep adjusting the sensitivity until it worked but didn't lock the wheels.)

Anyway, even with a 35' RV like they had, that Brake Buddy made a huge difference. If I remember correctly, the RV's GVW is about 15,000 and the Wrangler is probably well under 4,000. Needless to say, they definitely work and I'd highly recommend them anytime you're towing a vehicle.
 






Back
Top