Water pump failure leads to dead engine | Page 31 | Ford Explorer Forums - Serious Explorations

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Water pump failure leads to dead engine

Should Ford cover part of all of this repair out of loyalty?

  • Yes, a water pump failure at 95k should not destroy an engine

    Votes: 156 87.6%
  • No, and please quit whining about it

    Votes: 22 12.4%

  • Total voters
    178
For those gathering data, I have a water pump failure at 64k miles on my 2014 Explorer Sport. Currently working with Ford on solutions.
 



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Hi Motoarzan,

I work for a law firm in Ontario that is investigating this matter, and am wondering if you would be interested in speaking to me?
 






Just had a 2010 edge come in with overheating problem. Customer drove it about 5 miles after it started overheating to make it home (in intervals to keep it from staying pegged hot). Once I got the call I said do not drive anymore and get it towed in. The engine oil was chocolate milk for sure. Vehicle has 160k on it

The water pump failed to the point it has tight spots if you rotate it. Another 5 minutes of driving would have trashed the engine. Luckily the stealership had one in stock and got it back on the road in 2 days. Had to rinse everything down with brake cleaner and then oil before buttoning it up. I still only let it run about 20 minutes then changed the oil again before it left.

Part number on old water pump was the same as the new water pump other than the date stamp (10 vs 18). Last one I did was a Flex and it was a whole lot easier/roomier (3 hours more labor book time on Edge). If I do another Edge I'm dropping the subframe to make it easier.

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This will make you guys feel better. 260k miles on an older CX9 before failure.

 






Seems like this thread sort of died but I just wanted to add that I had a failure at 86K miles on a 2014 Ford Explorer Limited. Luckily, mine was caught during an inspection due to a rattling/loose sway bar. The pump was leaking at the weep hole and coolant did not yet enter the oil. Not that it was required but they did the spark plugs and I approved a new timing chain just because. I feel like I just paid a lot for an early 100k service. $3k (including front suspension) for at least another 86K? Seems worth it but time will tell.
 






Since my previous post I've done one on a 14 Taurus. Had 120k and was peeing out the weep hole with no coolant in the oil. The Taurus has a ton more room to work than everything else with this same pump, it only calls for like 8.5 hours.

The edge from above with the coolant intermix is still running great, has about 3k miles on it since the water pump job. I had it come back for (3) oil changes every 500 miles just to make sure I got all the water out.
 






Thanks for sharing. Splicing the "low wiper fluid" sensor wiring to an aftermarket coolant sensor on the reservoir is how I sleep well at night, as I will have the first jump on when my coolant is low.
 






Seems like this thread sort of died but I just wanted to add that I had a failure at 86K miles on a 2014 Ford Explorer Limited. Luckily, mine was caught during an inspection due to a rattling/loose sway bar. The pump was leaking at the weep hole and coolant did not yet enter the oil. Not that it was required but they did the spark plugs and I approved a new timing chain just because. I feel like I just paid a lot for an early 100k service. $3k (including front suspension) for at least another 86K? Seems worth it but time will tell.
Welcome to the Forum.:wave:
It's a good thing if the thread seems to be dying!

Peter
 






Splicing the "low wiper fluid" sensor wiring to an aftermarket coolant sensor on the reservoir is how I sleep well at night, as I will have the first jump on when my coolant is low.

Could you elaborate on how you now have sensor on your overflow tank. More specifically, what aftermarket sensor did you use? Also, will the sensor go off on your dash if either wiper fluid is low or the coolant is low since it is spliced, or are they individual warnings? TIA
 






Isn't it just as easy to look at the coolant level in the reservoir rather than waiting for the level to drop to a point where it triggers an alarm?

Peter
 






Isn't it just as easy to look at the coolant level in the reservoir rather than waiting for the level to drop to a point where it triggers an alarm?

Peter

Peter, No disrespect, but it sounds like you are assuming that everyone that drives a fifth generation Explorer is the same type of person that posts in this forum and will open the front hood a couple of times a month or so, not so. Don't forget there are plenty of teens, soccer moms, single moms, non mechanically inclined males and females of all ages, elderly, etc., who would never know to check the coolant level in this generation of Explorer. Most vehicle owners assume that if the coolant level gets low or leaks that the engine heats up and a check engine is lit with fair warning to pull over and get towed and then have the water pump and coolant replaced. Furthermore, I would bet that the vast majority of owners, if a poll were taken, have no idea that if the coolant level decreases in a fifth generation Explorer that it could leak externally or internally, flip a coin, and destroy the engine costing the owner about $7,000 to replace.

What Irishfred brought up could be the next Recall IMO:

Splicing the "low wiper fluid" sensor wiring to an aftermarket coolant sensor on the reservoir is how I sleep well at night, as I will have the first jump on when my coolant is low.

I'm not sure how this was done or where sensor detection is shown, but this is something that Ford should have done all vehicle models that have a water pump with the potential to leak into the engine block and destroy the engine.
 






Peter, No disrespect, but it sounds like you are assuming that everyone that drives a fifth generation Explorer is the same type of person that posts in this forum and will open the front hood a couple of times a month or so, not so. Don't forget there are plenty of teens, soccer moms, single moms, non mechanically inclined males and females of all ages, elderly, etc., who would never know to check the coolant level in this generation of Explorer. Most vehicle owners assume that if the coolant level gets low or leaks that the engine heats up and a check engine is lit with fair warning to pull over and get towed and then have the water pump and coolant replaced. Furthermore, I would bet that the vast majority of owners, if a poll were taken, have no idea that if the coolant level decreases in a fifth generation Explorer that it could leak externally or internally, flip a coin, and destroy the engine costing the owner about $7,000 to replace.

What Irishfred brought up could be the next Recall IMO:



I'm not sure how this was done or where sensor detection is shown, but this is something that Ford should have done all vehicle models that have a water pump with the potential to leak into the engine block and destroy the engine.

I agree on all counts id like to know myself. Clearly it will say "low washer fluid" if the sensor goes off being it is spliced in.. would love a writeup on this.

I also dont check my fluid level nor oil level between changes. Maybe it is more because I am still under warranty so dont really care.

I am glad my 2020 is on order (epas failed again after front end work and getting very tired of it) and will be taking it when it comes in.
 






Yeah, this coolant alarm hack could be a lifesaver for sure.

Yes, someone can eyeball it, but the sensor is always watching. The driver can only check every so often... and life's too short to have to check your coolant constantly, waiting for a failure regarded to be imminent.

This is why I avoided the 3.5L NA in my Explorer build... life's too short for that kind of nonsense.
 






Peter, No disrespect, but it sounds like you are assuming that everyone that drives a fifth generation Explorer is the same type of person that posts in this forum and will open the front hood a couple of times a month or so, not so.............

I'm not sure how this was done or where sensor detection is shown, but this is something that Ford should have done all vehicle models that have a water pump with the potential to leak into the engine block and destroy the engine.
My post was actually meant for Irishfred, not the general public. A low coolant warning is actually something all vehicles should have. I believe the only current indication of low coolant is when the engine starts to over heat.

Peter
 






Peter, No disrespect, but it sounds like you are assuming that everyone that drives a fifth generation Explorer is the same type of person that posts in this forum and will open the front hood a couple of times a month or so, not so.............

I'm not sure how this was done or where sensor detection is shown, but this is something that Ford should have done all vehicle models that have a water pump with the potential to leak into the engine block and destroy the engine.
My post was actually meant for Irishfred, not the general public. A low coolant warning is actually something all vehicles should have. I believe the only current indication of low coolant is when the engine starts to over heat.

Peter
 






will the 2020 Ex still have an internal water pump on the 3.5 liter engine?
 












will the 2020 Ex still have an internal water pump on the 3.5 liter engine?
Doubtful. The reason the pump was internal was that the 3.5L was a transversely mounted engine and there was no room to have an external water pump. Now with the longitudinal engine in the 2020, hopefully that won't be the case.

Peter
 






Seems like this thread sort of died but I just wanted to add that I had a failure at 86K miles on a 2014 Ford Explorer Limited. Luckily, mine was caught during an inspection due to a rattling/loose sway bar. The pump was leaking at the weep hole and coolant did not yet enter the oil. Not that it was required but they did the spark plugs and I approved a new timing chain just because. I feel like I just paid a lot for an early 100k service. $3k (including front suspension) for at least another 86K? Seems worth it but time will tell.

I discovered this thread because I had the exact same issue with my 2015 Explorer. $2600 to replace pump, plugs, belt, etc. . . .Discovered the coolant leak because my heat stopped working. Only defrost setting while car in motion generated heat. When car was stopped or on any other setting, only cold air blew from the vents. 98K on my Explorer . . . pretty infuriating . . .
 



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I discovered this thread because I had the exact same issue with my 2015 Explorer. $2600 to replace pump, plugs, belt, etc. . . .Discovered the coolant leak because my heat stopped working. Only defrost setting while car in motion generated heat. When car was stopped or on any other setting, only cold air blew from the vents. 98K on my Explorer . . . pretty infuriating . . .

Sounds like you got lucky.
All heat goes through the same heater core, so not getting heat in other HVAC settings is usually a blend door issue, but it got you into the shop to find the leak.
Poor interior heat like you describe could be failing thermostat or blend door issue.
If you are low on coolant, the heat only when moving makes sense(engine rpm higher to pump the remaining fluid through system).
 






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