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What type of welder is needed for suspension work?

hey guys, i have a question im sure most of you could answer...what type of welder would i need to buy for suspension work? like welding pearches, leaf shackle to frame, radius arms ect... arc? mig? tig? im just weighing all the costs before i fully commit to going SAS/SOA w/superlift springs :hammer:
and BTW i dont know how to weld but im pretty good at learning thingss lol
 



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BrooklynBay

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Spdrcer34

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If you don't know how to weld, I suggest a 220v MIG welder.

Anyone *SHOULD* be able to weld decently with one, after about 10 minutes of instruction.

One thing to keep in mind while budgeting....how are you going to power it?

Some guys add another outlet on their dryer circuit, just keep in mind you CAN NOT weld while doing laundry.

Ryan
 






rookieshooter

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I agree with the first post if your new at it. But I have both, a 110 MIG for sheet meat and light stuff and the one I use the most on all my suspension work is a 220 Hobart Arc.
Arc is Old School but it really penetrates. The arc is the one I'll be using today to work on my D44 front 4 link. I put my life on it.
If you are new at it, I would be %110 sure of your welding skills before attempting any suspension work.
You could post your welds for others to check out also. Don't expect to lay down a perfect weld at first.
 






chad551

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I bought a Millermatic 180 MIG, this is thing is sweet all you have to do set the metal thickness and it does everything else on its own (wire speed, heat) if you do not know how to set it yourself. I also bought a Miller Spectrum 375 X-treme plasma cutter, these tools will make your SAS a breeze.
 






patrick112390

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well i have pretty much access to every tool known to man, however its all at work, and i plan on doing this at home, most likely with a couple of high lift jacks...i have 5 months to do this as my girlfriend is away at ""fat camp" known as boot camp where shes getting her ass kicked into shape....i always do my time to research and "check it twice" is my motto. Ive looked at a lot of mig welders and they are exponsiveeeee! :rolleyes: so ebayyy it is! what do you think about this one?

http://cgi.ebay.com/NEW-Clarke-190E...dZViewItemQQptZBI_Welders?hash=item5636af7a1c

a little over $400 is doable, but i dont have a clue on how to run power for it....

is there no chance a 120v wall outlet welder would work?
 






kert0307

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The beefiest 120v mig welders will max out in the 3/16th to 1/4" thick material. This will be fine for a SAS, but you will have to wait for the welder to "cool down" every once and awhile because you will be running it at max capacity most of the time. The 110v units usually have a 20% duty cycle, meaning you theoretically can only use them for a max of 2 min out of ten or it will overheat.

If you don't plan on welding much afterwords a 110volt flux core welder would be best because you don't have to deal with the welding gas, and flux core gets a little better penetration than standard mig. Flux core is also better for out of position welding, which you will be doing a lot of in a SAS when you weld to the truck frame.

Going the cheaper route would be an arc welder (stick). Sick gets good penetration, but stick welding is almost an art form, it takes a decent amount of practice to put down good arc welds. An advantage of arc welding it that you can easily change up rods for different welding positions and metal types.


Edit: If you do get a 110v mig/flux core welder, do not get one that has a welding amp rating of less than 130 amps. (the cheaper 90amp ones will not have enough "beef" for what you need)
 






IZwack

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I bought a Millermatic 180 MIG, this is thing is sweet all you have to do set the metal thickness and it does everything else on its own (wire speed, heat).
x2 on the MM-180.

I used the Auto-Set feature for the first few weeks but quickly grew out of it. The settings printed inside the MM-180's cover has the correct numbers. Here's an Excel file which I've taped up around the garage for quick reference: http://izwack.com/dump/weld_speeds.xls
 






patrick112390

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rookieshooter

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Don't let the name Chicago fool you. It's made in China and I've heard that it's hard to get parts for and that the transformer is not of good quality as a Miller, Hobart which basically is a Miller, or Lincoln. I have no experience with that welder but from the power tools that I have bought from HF there won't be any more electric anything from China Freight.
My little Hobart MIG that I bought from a commercial sheet metal shop that used it for years before I bought worked another few years for me also.
 






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section525

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Buy the best and only cry once. I would definitely get something name brand, with parts being available locally. A Miller or Hobart is the way to go. Spend a little more now and be done with it. :cool:
 






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i also cant help thinking that i could use this one instead...
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=97503

its only 220v @ 120 amps but the price is only $199 down from $279!! and i remember seeing that it ends something like feb 2nd would i really be needing to take a break alot if i went with the 120amp vs the 160amp?
 






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