Getting prepared to do an engine and timing chains on a 4.0L | Page 3 | Ford Explorer Forums - Serious Explorations

  • Register Today It's free!

Getting prepared to do an engine and timing chains on a 4.0L

are the engines much different in 2003? Local parts place has zero in their computer for a 2002, but for 2003 they show the cloyes kit, on ebay, the cloyes kit says it wont fit a 2002, confusing... On top of that, when you google the part number, nobody has a clear definition, and different places show different items that come in the picture...

76117 was S&H number for the 2003 timing kit, they had zero in their computer for a 2002.. Cloyes 9-0398S

Cloyes website shows this kit
9-0398SB

but you cant find it as easy..
 



Join the Elite Explorers for $20 each year.
Elite Explorer members see no advertisements, no banner ads, no double underlined links,.
Add an avatar, upload photo attachments, and more!
.





eBay application listings

You can't rely on eBay application listings being accurate.
Reliability improvements were made in the camshaft timing chain components up thru 2002. For those components the only incompatibility I'm aware of is the interference when installing/removing the left guide assembly in the 3rd Generation and later engines due to the head casting/block casting misalignment. As I recall the Cloyes cassette guide has the circlip pivot bushing which allows replacement in the later engines without removing the head.
 
























parts, gaskets and tool kit should be here this week, another question, since his old motor threw parts through the side of the block, he is asking about putting new bearings in this motor, is it worth doing that with only 90K on it? His old motor had around 160K or so
 






probably not

I pulled one of the main bearing caps off and checked the clearance and scoring of the bearing at 150K miles. It was in pretty good shape so I didn't replace the bearings. However, at the time I was planning to rebuild the engine in another 10K miles. Instead, I added a pre-oiler which significantly reduces bearing wear by eliminating dry starts.
 






Ok, got all the parts and the tool kit and all that, put them on today, but noticed I didnt get the front jackshaft chain that goes to the crank :/ Looking into if I forgot to order it, or decided reusing the old one was ok?

I also dont have new bolts for the timing sprockets, are they a must?

Also, I know everything is right and nothing shifted, but the balance shaft sprocket timing marks are off, thats how it was when I got it, does that one matter? as it clearly was running that way from the factory, unless the chain skipped....
 






primary chain

Ok, got all the parts and the tool kit and all that, put them on today, but noticed I didnt get the front jackshaft chain that goes to the crank :/ Looking into if I forgot to order it, or decided reusing the old one was ok?

If you're asking if it OK to reuse the primary (crankshaft to jackshaft) chain I would say probably.

I also dont have new bolts for the timing sprockets, are they a must?

As I posted earlier the bolts for the jackshaft sprockets are not specified as TTY but are torqued as if they are. Many members have reused TTY bolts once. The camshaft sprocket retaining bolts are not TTY.

Also, I know everything is right and nothing shifted, but the balance shaft sprocket timing marks are off, thats how it was when I got it, does that one matter? as it clearly was running that way from the factory, unless the chain skipped....

Balance Shaft Timing Procedure
 






so even though the balance shaft has been running off time, you think I should change it then?

Thanks for the fast reply! Your a lifesaver
 












right, I suppose once everything is torqued back down I could spin it over by hand and see if it finally lines itself back up for curiosity sake.

Thanks again.
 






What are these for?

photo%20%282%29-XL.jpg
 






gallery plug & tensioner compression ring

See posts 8, 10 and 11 of this thread: Starting my 00M12 Installation

Be very careful when attempting to loosen the gallery plug since the Torx head will strip easily. Soak the exterior threads with P B Blaster for at least an hour. If you have an impact extractor use it. If not, tap the Torx bit with a hammer to make sure it is seated in the plug. Press down hard on the socket drive when attempting to loosen the plug.
 






plug came out easy, and it already had the plastic restrictor thing in there, so I just put the new plug in.

two questions, what is a solid way to hold the main timing shaft to tighten the rear chain sprocket? The timing kit doesnt come with anything to hold that sprocket... Do I tighten the front one first? Since they both go to the same measurement, putting a bar on the bolt on the opposite end should do it, right? If that makes sense.
 






camshaft gear holding tool

. . .
two questions, what is a solid way to hold the main timing shaft to tighten the rear chain sprocket? The timing kit doesnt come with anything to hold that sprocket... Do I tighten the front one first? Since they both go to the same measurement, putting a bar on the bolt on the opposite end should do it, right? If that makes sense.

OTC6488Kit.jpg

Tool 6482 (item 7), camshaft gear holding tool adapter fits inside of tool 6478 (item 4), camshaft gear holding tool.

Why don't you follow the timing instructions: SOHC V6 Camshaft Timing
 






That doesnt specifically talk about the proper way to do the jackshaft sprockets, or I missed it...

Hold crankshaft from turning with special tool 303-674 or improvised tool and tighten the New jackshaft sprocket bolt in two stages:
Tighten the bolt to 45 Nm (33 lb-ft).
Tighten the bolt an additional 90 degrees.

So its OK to let it fight against the plastic guides? I just dont want to break those.
 






using the tools

One tool keeps the camshaft from turning and the other tool at the other end keeps the camshaft sprocket from turning. Remember the rear camshaft sprocket retaining bolt tightens counter-clockwise and if you use the lever arm tool the applied torque is less. Also, many click-type torque wrenches do not click when tightening counter-clockwise. I use a deflection bar torque wrench for counter-clockwise tightening.
 






I would replace the rear main seal while the engine is out. That's what I did during my timing chain service.
 



Join the Elite Explorers for $20 each year.
Elite Explorer members see no advertisements, no banner ads, no double underlined links,.
Add an avatar, upload photo attachments, and more!
.











Back
Top