Wanting to get rid of the chipped key, see post | Ford Explorer Forums - Serious Explorations

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Wanting to get rid of the chipped key, see post

ProjectAviator

Elite Explorer
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1994 XLT,
Is there away to place the chipped key in the column and just use a standard key to start it? Kind of like when you install a remote start in a chipped vehicle.
I only got one key when I purchased my 99 Ex. This key is so warn I can pull it out of the ignition at anytime. Even while running and remains running.
Is this possible?

Thanks
Tim
 



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Maybe some info in this thread will help: Ignition lock cylinder (locked-up)

I am lucky and have one of the original keys to make copies from that came with my Explorer.
 






Yes. You can either remove the chip from the key, or put the whole key in the steering column trim cover (3 Phillips screws from underneath IIRC) then you can use a non-chipped key, or do whatever you plan to do, to start it. There's a black plastic ring-shaped transceiver that goes around the ignition lock cylinder. This is what reads the chip. Placing the key near this ring should work fine.
 






You can also get a new key cut and transfer the chip to the new key, or IIRC you can use Forscan app on a PC with a wifi or bluetooth OBDII ELM327 dongle to program a new key w/chip bought on (wherever, Amazon, eBay, etc) and cut to match.

Keep in mind that you may be wearing out your lock cylinder too... think I'd spray some lube in there.
 






Yes. You can either remove the chip from the key, or put the whole key in the steering column trim cover (3 Phillips screws from underneath IIRC) then you can use a non-chipped key, or do whatever you plan to do, to start it. There's a black plastic ring-shaped transceiver that goes around the ignition lock cylinder. This is what reads the chip. Placing the key near this ring should work fine.
@koda2000
Question about permanently placing chip on transceiver: This will surely work if a non-chip key, cut to work the cylinder, is used. But what if another chipped key is used? Will transceiver ignore the added chip presence, or might it kill the whole works? I want to try, as I have only one working key, but am hesditant. Have you tried this? Thanks! imp
 






@imp, interesting thought.

I would think the transceiver would only recognize the correct chip. Why would a second chip be involved?
 






The transceiver only reads the chip and passes it's code to the PCM through the PATS module. Only a chip that is recognized by the PCM will allow the fuel injectors to operate and the engine to run. I've read where other's have done this very thing (placing their chipped key or chip permanently in close proximity to the transceiver) to get around PATS w/out an issue.

It wasn't clear to me why you want to do this, but it's a way around PATS, although it does defeat the anti-theft system.

If you purchase and have a second chipped key cut, you need to get a locksmith or your Ford dealer to program it's code into the PCM. You can also have your old key cloned to a new key at Ace Hardware, but having a cloned key will not allow you to program additional keys yourself. I've read where perhaps Forscan will allow you to program a second key yourself, but IDK for sure.

If your lock cylinder is worn out, you can just replace the lock cylinder, but you'd need a locksmith to change the combination of the new cylinder to allow you old key to turn it (has nothing to do with PATS).
 






Forscan will definitely allow you to clear out existing keys and program new ones. I bought my 99 Ranger with a single key. Purchased a second strattec key on ebay, had it cut locally, then used Forscan to get both keys into the system.
 






My way around this was to wire in a programmable PATS bypass module along with my remote start unit I installed myself. Used on 2 different trucks and they work great, you use your key in the ignition and tap into the PATS and it reads and copies the signal, and permanently sends the signal to the PATS module. Basically the new school version of sticking the key in the column. This DOES make the vehicle less secure; use at your own risk.
 






My way around this was to wire in a programmable PATS bypass module along with my remote start unit I installed myself. Used on 2 different trucks and they work great, you use your key in the ignition and tap into the PATS and it reads and copies the signal, and permanently sends the signal to the PATS module. Basically the new school version of sticking the key in the column. This DOES make the vehicle less secure; use at your own risk.
@Anticitizen1
Please, more info! Is the pats bypass module a separate unit from the remote start, or part of it? If separate, where is it available from, what is it called? imp
 






@imp, interesting thought.

I would think the transceiver would only recognize the correct chip. Why would a second chip be involved?
@toypaseo
My wording is not clear, sorry. I have only one chipped key which will start the engine (2004 Ex). I have several other chipped keys toothed to operate the lock cylinder, but none will start the engine. My question is, if I tape the working key to the transceiver, then insert a non-working key (which has a non-recognized chip), will that goof everything up, and NONE will work? imp
 






You can program keys into your Ford with Forscan? I didn't know that, this thread is a learning experience.
 






If you place/glue the one working chipped key near the transceiver, just get a non chipped key cut (a few dollars at the hardware store) to operate the lock cylinder. Using 2 chipped keys will probably confuse the heck out of the PATS system. I don't think it will hurt anything, but it very well activate the anti-theft function.
 






I suppose if you had to, you could pull the chips out of non-paired keys until you get around to programming them in, IF having two chips confuses the system.

On the original '98 key I'm looking at, there's clearly a plug in the top that you should be able to pry out with an X-acto knife or something to get the chip out. Then again if the chip is friction fit in there, you might need a tiny hole at the other end too, to poke a straightened paperclip in to push it out.

It might be constructed like the following (though this is just an internet pic I found, not of my actual key):

34hut8i.jpg
 






I think what IMP is thinking is if you have two fords with chipped keys will one interfere with another.
I asked a dealer the same question. and I was told NO, No interference.
I have two chipped keys the Explorer and our 17 Lincoln MKZ no problems at all.
I don't really have any fear of it getting stolen. It's a 19 year old base model explorer. Plus not many people can drive a manual transmission now days.
I actually cannot fathom this. My 98 and 99 Explorer has/had chipped keys, my $12k 2001 Ford Focus LX had a chipped key. Yet my $50k 2004 Yukon Denali didn't. Go figure.

Tim
 






I think what IMP is thinking is if you have two fords with chipped keys will one interfere with another.
I asked a dealer the same question. and I was told NO, No interference.
I have two chipped keys the Explorer and our 17 Lincoln MKZ no problems at all.
I don't really have any fear of it getting stolen. It's a 19 year old base model explorer. Plus not many people can drive a manual transmission now days.
I actually cannot fathom this. My 98 and 99 Explorer has/had chipped keys, my $12k 2001 Ford Focus LX had a chipped key. Yet my $50k 2004 Yukon Denali didn't. Go figure.

Tim

I don't think the issue with having 2 chips close to the transceiver is "interference" it's more an issue of which chip will be read and if one chip isn't programmed it may not allow the engine to start.
 






If you place/glue the one working chipped key near the transceiver, just get a non chipped key cut (a few dollars at the hardware store) to operate the lock cylinder. Using 2 chipped keys will probably confuse the heck out of the PATS system. I don't think it will hurt anything, but it very well activate the anti-theft function.
@koda2000
My concern exactly.
 






The PATS receiver only reads the key programmed for it and then starts the engine. It won't read another key at all.
 






The PATS receiver only reads the key programmed for it and then starts the engine. It won't read another key at all.

IDK that I agree with that. If it doesn't "read" whatever key is placed into the ignition cylinder and pass that info to the PCM how does it know which is the correct key? Reading is not the same as verifying.
 



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IDK that I agree with that. If it doesn't "read" whatever key is placed into the ignition cylinder and pass that info to the PCM how does it know which is the correct key? Reading is not the same as verifying.
@koda2000
You're saying ALL keys are being "read", but only the one(s) accepted by the programming will work. Matter of semantics, IMO. BTW, the "pass/fail" I believe is directed to the Security Module, which then "allows" PCM to function normally (crank engine, in 3rd. gens, enable (I hear) injectors in 2nd. gen. I've driven without a security issue since 1955, and sure didn't need this high-fallutin' bullsh!t! imp
 






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