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2013 PIU rear end sway


Taxer

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13 pi
Encountering rear end sway instability on patchy slippery surfaces zz
With traction on and new snows.
Handles excellent in all snow conditions. Tire pressure 36psi per door post..
Have a 2014 police interceptor too, but does not have the same problem
 


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Taxer

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Its like it's - traction control- too slow to react??
 




KayGee

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Sounds like you may be describing the same issue in the retail section. You can check your alignment, specifically front and rear toe, as that could cause a feeling of instability if it is not correct.

Otherwise, you just have to learn the characteristics of the vehicle and drive it in the appropriate manner for the conditions. I don't know of any vehicles that haven't gotten squirrely on patchy slick roads. Most just can't react fast enough and none can predict the road conditions in advance to counteract them.
 




Taxer

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Ahhhhhh, son said rear summer tires were worn a bit on the inside.. saw the retail problems but never heard a solution, so thx. Let me know how you make out with the headrest project. Do you know if all the headrests are 4" center mounts? Thx
 




peterk9

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Taxer

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Sounds like you may be describing the same issue in the retail section. You can check your alignment, specifically front and rear toe, as that could cause a feeling of instability if it is not correct.

Otherwise, you just have to learn the characteristics of the vehicle and drive it in the appropriate manner for the conditions. I don't know of any vehicles that haven't gotten squirrely on patchy slick roads. Most just can't react fast enough and none can predict the road conditions in advance to counteract them.
Had the vehicle aligned last week, front and rear toe were out of wack by quite a bit both the front and back. Computerized report said all 4 were out and showed them adjusted accordingly. Funny how the rear tires were worn on the inside, but the toe was opposite, until I realized the front were the opposite, so the dealer moved the summer tires from the front to back. Guess they would have eventually had the even wear.... Posting now because son took it out in the snow patches tonight and said it handle much better! thx again.
 




KayGee

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People don't think toe be like dat, but it do. The bolded section below explains how excessive/improper toe can cause a vehicle to feel unsettled on slippery surfaces.

Tirerack.com said:
Toe

The toe angle identifies the exact direction the tires are pointed compared to the centerline of the vehicle when viewed from directly above. Toe is expressed in either degrees or fractions-of-an-inch, and an axle is said to have positive toe-in when imaginary lines running through the centerlines of the tires intersect in front of the vehicle and have negative toe-out when they diverge. The toe setting is typically used to help compensate for the suspension bushings compliance to enhance tire wear. Toe can also be used to adjust vehicle handling.
Toe Angle

A rear-wheel drive vehicle "pushes" the front axle's tires as they roll along the road. Tire rolling resistance causes a little drag resulting in rearward movement of the suspension arms against their bushings. Because of this, most rear-wheel drive vehicles use some positive toe-in to compensate for the movement, enabling the tires to run parallel to each other at speed.

Conversely, a front-wheel drive vehicle "pulls" the vehicle through the front axle, resulting in forward movement of the suspension arms against their bushings. Therefore most front-wheel drive vehicles use some negative toe-out to compensate for the movement, again enabling the tires to run parallel to each other at speed.

Toe can also be used to alter a vehicle's handling traits. Increased toe-in will typically result in reduced oversteer, help steady the car and enhance high-speed stability. Increased toe-out will typically result in reduced understeer, helping free up the car, especially during initial turn-in while entering a corner.

Before adjusting toe outside the vehicle manufacturer's recommended settings to manipulate handling, be aware that toe settings will influence wet weather handling and tire wear as well.

Excessive toe settings often bring with them drivability problems, especially during heavy rain. This is because the daily pounding of tractor trailers on many highways leave ruts that fill with water. Since excessive toe means that each tire is pointed in a direction other than straight ahead, when the vehicle encounters a puddle that causes only one tire to lose some of its grip, the other tire's toe setting will push (excessive toe-in) or pull (excessive toe-out) the vehicle to the side. This may make the vehicle feel unsettled and very "nervous."

Additionally the vehicle's toe is one of the most critical alignment settings relative to tire wear. A toe setting that is just a little off its appropriate setting can make a huge difference in their wear. Consider that if the toe setting is just 1/16-inch off of its appropriate setting, each tire on that axle will scrub almost seven feet sideways every mile! Extend it out and you'll discover that rather than running parallel to each other, the front tires will scrub over 1/4-mile sideways during every 100 miles of driving! Incorrect toe will rob you of tire life.
 




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