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changing oil this weekend..what brand do u recommend?

EliteConcept

Explorer Addict
Joined
June 5, 2001
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City, State
LaPorte, Indiana
Year, Model & Trim Level
04 Civic LX
my 92 X has 107,000 miles on it
Until now i've been using castrol 10w-30.
I'm going to put 5w-30 in it for the winter.
my truck runs a little funny...what brand of oil do you suggest??? and why

thanks!
 



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Mobil 1 5w-30 fully synthetic
 






I've only heard good thigns about Valvoline Max Life.

I use Pennzoil, its cheap and I have no complaints about it at all, but once it runs out I'm switching to Valvoline.
 






Ditto on the Valvoline Max Life. My truck performs just like it did on Mobil 1, so i think the reduced cost with VML is a definite plus!
 






Mobil 1.

No other will do.
 






im for mobil 1 full synthetic too.
 






I got a 5-quart in a bottle Mobil 1 5W-30 Tri-Synthetic yesterday at Wal-Mart for $17. It's very cheap!!!
 






I use Quaker State Ultra-synthetic 5w30 in both the explorer and my F-150. I love the stuff even more then the Mobil 1 I switched from. I've been going 5,000-6,000 miles without changing the oil and aside from being blacker, the oil coming out is pretty much the same as the oil that goes in. I use the MObil 1 filter on my F-150 because it only gets the best :). The explorer gets whatever the hell I find on sale, LOL j/k.
 






If you want synthetic, I recommend the Mobil1, Redline, or Royal Purple.
 






If you want the best, get AMSOIL.
 






OK. I change my answer.

Royal Purple is probably the best, but also the most expensive. For a "reasonable" price go with Mobil 1. My brother uses Royal Purple fluids in his Impreza. It's great stuff, but really expensive. The motor oil works so well it'll actually give a hp or two sometimes.
 






I just found my back issue of an extensive oil test performed by Consumer Reports several years ago. They did a test of all the major brand oils, both mineral and synthetics. The test was done in NYC taxi cabs. The test basically consisted of rebuilding identical 6-cylinder engines with flat tappet cams. Wear components such as bearing, lifters, rings, etc were weighed. The engines were run for 75,000 miles, had the oil changed regularly, disassembled the engines, and weighed the wear components. Their conclusion??? No statictical difference between the various oil brands or types, synthetics included. They also tried some extended oil change schedules. Again, no statistical difference. Their advice? Buy whats cheapest. Why spend money on products that show no difference in how well they protect the engine?
 






Mobile Synthetic and a Mobil Filter!
 






Valvoline Max Life is actually great stuff too.
 






i'd like to read the details of the consumer reports test..
If they just ran the motor and didn't turn the motor on and off and run it under different loads and temps..then i could see how they'd think every oil is the same.
I've seen the effects of using pennzoil for many years on an engine. pulled the valve covers off and saw lumps of wax underneath the oil ports. BLECk
 






Astrochimp,
I've got the report in front of me, and I'll quote selected passages. You're right, they didn't do many cold starts. This is from the July 1996 edition.

"We put identical engines with precisely measured parts into the cabs at the beginning of the test, and we changed their oil every 6000 miles. That's about twice as long as the automakers recommend for the severe serice that taxicabs see, but we chose that interval to accelerate the test results and provide worst-case condition. After 60,000 miles, we disassembled each engine and checked for wear and harmful deposits."

"When the cabs aren't on the go, they're typically standing at curbside with the engine idling - far tougher on motor oil than highway driving."

"Big-city cabs don't see many cold start-ups or long periods of high-speed driving in extreme heat. But our test results relate to the most common type of severe - stop-and-go city driving."

"We tested oils of the two most commonly recommended viscosity grades - 10W-30 and 5W-30."

"A popular belief is that 5W-30 oils, despite their designation, are too thin to protect vital engine parts when they get hot. However, one of our laboratory tests measured the viscosity of oils under high-temperature, high-stress conditions and found essentially no difference between 5W-30 oils and their 10W-30 brand mates. But at low temperatures, the 5W-30 oil flowed more easily."

"More extensive tests, under other driving conditions, might have revealed minor differences. But thorough statistical analysis of our data showed no brand - not even the expensive synthetics - to be meaningfully better or worse in our tests."

"All the oils proved excellent at preventing sludge. At least part of the reason may be that sludge is more apt to form during cold startups and short trips, and the cabs were rarely out of service long enough for their engine to get cold. Even so, the accumulation in our engines were so light that we wouldn't expect sludge to be a problem with any of these oils under most conditions."

"In our tests, brand didn't matter much as long as the oil carried the industry's starburst symbol."

"One distinction: According to the laboratory tests, Mobil 1 and Pennzoil Performax synthetics flow exceptionally easily at low temperatures - a condition our taxi tests didn't simulate effectively. They also had the higher viscosity under high-temperature, high-stress conditions, when a thick oil protects the engine. Thus, these oils may be a good choice for hard driving in extreme conditions."

"None of the tested oils proved better than the others in our tests. There may be small differences that our tests didn't reveal, but unless you typically drive under more severe conditions than a New York cab does, you won't go wrong if you shop strictly by price or availability. Buy the viscosity grade recommended in your owner's manual, and look for the starburst emblem. Even the expensive synthetics worked no better than conventional motor oils in our taxi tests, but they're worth considering for extreme driving conditions - high ambient temperatures and high engine loads or very cold temperatures.
On the basis of our test results, we think that the commonly recommended 3000-mile oil-change interval is conservative. For "normal" service, 7500-mile intervals (or the recommendation in your owner's manual) should be fine. Change the oil at least that often to protect your engine and maintain your warranty. Even for the severe service experienced by the taxis in our tests, a 6000-mile interval was adequate. But some severe service - frequent cold starts and short trips, dusty conditions, trailer towing - may require a shorter interval. Note, too, that special engines such as diesels and turbos, which we didn't test, may need more frequent oil changes."

So there you have it, straight from the horses mouth. I had to key all this in, so there may be some typos.

Oils tested were:
Castrol GTX 5W-30 and 10W-30
Exxon Superflo 5W-30 and 10W-30
Shell Fire & Ice All-Season 5W-30 and 10W-30
Havoline Formula 3 5W-30 and 10W-30
Mobil 5W-30 and 10W-30
Pennzoil 5W-30 and 10W-30
Quaker State 5W-30 and 10W-30
Valvoline All-Climate 5W-30 and 10W-30
Kendall Superb 100 10W-30
Mobil 1 10W-30
Pennzoil Performax 10W-30
Valvoline Semi-Synthetic DuraBlend 10W-30

Whew...
 
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Thanks for the info.
 






yeah, goood stuff to know
 






Thanks...

for typing all that in. Was quite a lot. Anyhow, I think the key thing in the article is where they state that "Mobil 1 and Pennzoil Performax synthetics flow exceptionally easily at low temperatures - a condition our taxi tests didn't simulate effectively. They also had the higher viscosity under high-temperature, high-stress conditions, when a thick oil protects the engine. Thus, these oils may be a good choice for hard driving in extreme conditions."

As most know, most of the wear in an engine is on startup in the first few seconds of grinding when the oil is cold and doesn't flow very well. The synthetics do flow better when the engine is cold, and thus lubricate the engine sooner. This will yield an overall increase in engine longevity. Whether it's worth it or not is up to each person. I'll just keep using my Mobil 1.

Also, they mention something about high-load conditions. I think that pretty much sums up my driving.... :)
 



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I use Trak Auto oil. It's made by Mobil, and is equivelent to their basic oil. I've had no problems.
Pete
 






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