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How to: Rear Timing Chain Tensioner Replacement

steadyhand

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2000, you said don't remove chain from Crank and Jackshaft sprockets but what if someone wants to replace the primary chain? Is the primary chain worth replacing or does it normally hold up fairly well? If the primary chain usually holds up then I'll save the $30 and not pull the chain off the sprockets.

BTW, thanks again for the help.

Also did anyone find out what size metric bolts are needed to remove the balancer?
 


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2000StreetRod

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another thread

2000, you said don't remove chain from Crank and Jackshaft sprockets but what if someone wants to replace the primary chain? Is the primary chain worth replacing or does it normally hold up fairly well? If the primary chain usually holds up then I'll save the $30 and not pull the chain off the sprockets.

After only a few hours of rotation wear patterns develop between the timing chain and sprockets. That's why it is important to keep the chain on the sprockets if they must be removed. The chains and sprockets last much longer than the guides. The chains and sprockets should be replaced as an assembly.

Also did anyone find out what size metric bolts are needed to remove the balancer?

M8-1.25x100mm
See post #4 of new thread: SOHC V6 Timing Chain Inspection & Repair
 




steadyhand

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OK I got another question. :)

The 6488 kit has the tool 6479 for holding the crankshaft. If I have this tool, do I have to use a pipe wrench, strap wrench, or any other method to hold the balancer while the bolt is loosened? I wasn't sure if that method was just for those who didn't have the OTC kit. If I still have to hold the balancer with a strap wrench, what then is the 6479 tool used for because I saw a picture where it was gripping the teeth on the balancer.

Also, the description for the tool said to rotate the engine counter clockwise until it contacts the block. I was under the impression this is not something we want to do because the chain could slip.

EDIT: I looked at the right passenger side tensioner and guide. The traction side appears to be intact, at least the upper section. The tensioner side is nearly impossible to see with the engine still in the truck but I put my hand back there and I can deffinately feel the guide there pressing against the chain and it felt tight on both sides. I am guessing that side is good.

Question: Where is the camshaft positioning sensor on the cams? I thought it was a metal tab that sticks out to mark the position. I don't see it on the back of the right cam. Is it on the sprocket side of the right cam? If so, that will be a pain to line up properly. I've had a hard time so far just getting the valve covers off. I see this taking a few weeks to complete.
 




2000StreetRod

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crankshaft holder

OK I got another question. :)

The 6488 kit has the tool 6479 for holding the crankshaft. If I have this tool, do I have to use a pipe wrench, strap wrench, or any other method to hold the balancer while the bolt is loosened? I wasn't sure if that method was just for those who didn't have the OTC kit. If I still have to hold the balancer with a strap wrench, what then is the 6479 tool used for because I saw a picture where it was gripping the teeth on the balancer.

The crankshaft holding tool is a fairly flimsy tool. It's purpose is to keep the crankshaft at TDC while the camshaft sprocket retaining bolt is tightened (62 ft-lbs). Rotation of the crankshaft is also prevented by the tensioner tool and the sprocket holding tool that keeps the chain from moving. Also, the camshaft rotates half as fast as the crankshaft so 62 ft-lbs at the camshaft is only 31 ft-lbs at the crankshaft. I suspect the crankshaft holding tool alone is not strong enough to hold the crankshaft when loosening or tightening the balancer bolt (> 100 ft-lbs).

Also, the description for the tool said to rotate the engine counter clockwise until it contacts the block. I was under the impression this is not something we want to do because the chain could slip.

I believe the procedure says clockwise not counter- clockwise. The procedure is written assuming the camshaft sprocket retaining bolts are loose allowing free rotation of the sprockets and chains. Also, it assumes the guides and tensioners are in good condition and that the timing will be performed after installation of the crankshaft holder.

EDIT: I looked at the right passenger side tensioner and guide. The traction side appears to be intact, at least the upper section. The tensioner side is nearly impossible to see with the engine still in the truck but I put my hand back there and I can deffinately feel the guide there pressing against the chain and it felt tight on both sides. I am guessing that side is good.

Be thankful!

Question: Where is the camshaft positioning sensor on the cams? I thought it was a metal tab that sticks out to mark the position. I don't see it on the back of the right cam. Is it on the sprocket side of the right cam? If so, that will be a pain to line up properly. I've had a hard time so far just getting the valve covers off. I see this taking a few weeks to complete.

The camshaft position sensor is located in the left valve cover just aft of the oil filler port. The tab (protrusion) for the sensor is on the camshaft. The left and right camshafts are different. The camshafts are timed by the offset slots. The tab is used to notify the PCM of camshaft position for energizing the injectors and for determining if the #1 piston is on the compression stroke or the exhaust stroke when preparing to time the camshafts.

If you understand the process and have the tools timing the camshafts takes less than an hour if there are no problems. Some members have had difficulty using the tools at the firewall.
 




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Forgive me for all the questions and the jumping around. I am not getting much sleep because of this but at the same time I have to do this myself.

I am also not confident I am going to get this timing right afterward and I can't afford for it to be wrong. So...

If I use the timing tool kit just to lock both cam shafts where there at right now and also use the crank tool to make sure it stays in it's current location, can I then loosen the Jackshaft sprocket to slide the left chain off and put the new guide into place? Any problem with this that I might be missing?

I know the primary chain and left chain both need to go back onto the jackshaft sprocket in the same spot they came off. I can mark the sprocket and both chains to keep track of exactly which tooth they need to be on.

This would keep the timing the same and the new guide would then tighten up that chain again on the traction side and help prevent the chain from slipping, right?

I would also be replacing the primary tensioner and guide, but you already said they can be replaced without removing the chain.

I will also be pulling the oil pan to clean out the oil pump and put in new synthetic oil.

Basically I would only be replacing the left guide and tensioner as well as the primary tensioner and guide, not the chains.

If this would get me by until tax season that is all I need because I'll be getting a new 5.0 Mustang then. But at the same time, I would like for the problem it has right now to have at least received some care. That is why I'm hoping that the new guides and tensioners is enough to fix this problem without me having to retime everything.

If this is possible I think this is what I'll have to do because to be honest, this retiming scares the wits out of me. I want to make sure I am not forgetting anything here. Just so I understand this right, as long as the cams and crank are locked at their current position and the chains are put back into their original location my timing will be the same, right?

I know it might not make sense to buy the kit and not replace the chains, but for my own personal assurance I'd feel better knowing the timing will be right because I didn't release it to begin with.
 




2000StreetRod

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not enough tools in kit

. . .
If I use the timing tool kit just to lock both cam shafts where there at right now and also use the crank tool to make sure it stays in it's current location, can I then loosen the Jackshaft sprocket to slide the left chain off and put the new guide into place? Any problem with this that I might be missing?

There are no duplicate tools in the timing tool kit. There are only enough tools to hold the crankshaft and one of the camshafts. Also, Ford assumes that the timing cover and balancer will be installed when the crankshaft holding tool is installed. It fits around the smaller diameter of the balancer. I guess you could temporarily install the balancer with the timing cover off and then try to install the crankshaft holder but I don't know if it will work when the timing cover is not installed. Also, you can't remove the jackshaft sprocket without also removing the crankshaft sprocket with the chain and the balancer would be in the way.

I know the primary chain and left chain both need to go back onto the jackshaft sprocket in the same spot they came off. I can mark the sprocket and both chains to keep track of exactly which tooth they need to be on.

This would keep the timing the same and the new guide would then tighten up that chain again on the traction side and help prevent the chain from slipping, right?

I would also be replacing the primary tensioner and guide, but you already said they can be replaced without removing the chain.

I will also be pulling the oil pan to clean out the oil pump and put in new synthetic oil.

Basically I would only be replacing the left guide and tensioner as well as the primary tensioner and guide, not the chains.

If this would get me by until tax season that is all I need because I'll be getting a new 5.0 Mustang then. But at the same time, I would like for the problem it has right now to have at least received some care. That is why I'm hoping that the new guides and tensioners is enough to fix this problem without me having to retime everything.

If this is possible I think this is what I'll have to do because to be honest, this retiming scares the wits out of me. I want to make sure I am not forgetting anything here. Just so I understand this right, as long as the cams and crank are locked at their current position and the chains are put back into their original location my timing will be the same, right?

I know it might not make sense to buy the kit and not replace the chains, but for my own personal assurance I'd feel better knowing the timing will be right because I didn't release it to begin with.

The camshaft timing process is really not that complicated if you have the tool kit. There's another explanation of how to use the tools on the internet and I may have a copy of it on my other computer. If you PM me your e-mail address I'll either send you a copy or a link.
 




steadyhand

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There are no duplicate tools in the timing tool kit. There are only enough tools to hold the crankshaft and one of the camshafts. Also, Ford assumes that the timing cover and balancer will be installed when the crankshaft holding tool is installed. It fits around the smaller diameter of the balancer. I guess you could temporarily install the balancer with the timing cover off and then try to install the crankshaft holder but I don't know if it will work when the timing cover is not installed. Also, you can't remove the jackshaft sprocket without also removing the crankshaft sprocket with the chain and the balancer would be in the way.
Your right I never thought about that. Basically I could only lock the left cam in order to take the sprocket off and I would have to feed the guide down through there and put the bolt into place, which will be a real pain and time consuming but it still ensures correct timing. Basically I would be paying $180 for a timing tool kit and would only be using the tools for locking that one cam. I wouldn't need to put it at TDC or worry about the left cam being off though. I'd just be fighting with getting the guide into place. The problem is I don't know how to tighten the 10mm bolt that holds the guide if I can't get any more than a open wrench on it. Not sure if it requires any certain torque.
 




2000StreetRod

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Cassette bolt

According to my Haynes manual the torque for the left cassette bolts is 89 to 123 in-lbs. That's about 10 ft-lbs or less and I doubt that it is critical. You could practice on a test bolt that is about the same size and easily accessible. I agree that $180+ is a lot to pay for something that you're not really going to use. What about your original idea of not loosening the jackshaft bolt, marking the left sprocket, camshaft and chain, replacing the left guide assembly and restoring the timing using the marks? When the crankshaft has #1 piston at TDC on the compression stroke the left camshaft has a lot less tendency to rotate than the right.

What is the current state of the engine? I know that you have removed the upper intake manifold and the valve covers. Anything else?
 




2000StreetRod

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left cassette lower bolt photo

The photo below by CDW6212R shows the left cassette lower mounting bolt that is under the removed jackshaft sprocket.
Projectthread067.JPG
 




steadyhand

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Current state is just the upper intake, valve covers, radiator, and oil is drained. I've been spending so much time reading on this issue I haven't had much time working on it.

Also, someone at my local Ford dealer said that in order to time the cams you have to remove the rollers that press on the rocker arms. First off I have no idea what he is talking about because the only thing I see are the camshaft lobes that press on the rocker arms. You can't get the rocker arms on once the cam is bolted into place and timed.

He claims to know a lot about this subject and having rebuilt a couple of these engines, but some of what he said didn't make any sense.

He did also mention making sure the jackshaft bearing wasn't damaged. Well if it was there isn't much I can do about that since I would have to pull the engine out. If I had means right now of pulling the engine I would but I would rebuild the entire engine. Come tax season I'll be getting an engine hoist and stand because once I get a 5.0 Mustang I'll be pulling that engine for mods. The 302 is much easier to work on though :)
 




2000StreetRod

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removing rollers that press on rocker arms

Current state is just the upper intake, valve covers, radiator, and oil is drained. I've been spending so much time reading on this issue I haven't had much time working on it.

Also, someone at my local Ford dealer said that in order to time the cams you have to remove the rollers that press on the rocker arms. First off I have no idea what he is talking about because the only thing I see are the camshaft lobes that press on the rocker arms. You can't get the rocker arms on once the cam is bolted into place and timed.

He claims to know a lot about this subject and having rebuilt a couple of these engines, but some of what he said didn't make any sense.

The rollers are on the rocker arms and not removable as far as I know. There is a potential problem if the camshaft is removed and reinstalled without first removing the rocker arms. The camshaft thrust bearing may bind against the bearing journal when tightening down the bearing caps and if not careful a bearing cap may break. The rocker arms can be removed without removing the camshaft with a special tool that compresses the valve springs.

He did also mention making sure the jackshaft bearing wasn't damaged. Well if it was there isn't much I can do about that since I would have to pull the engine out. If I had means right now of pulling the engine I would but I would rebuild the entire engine. Come tax season I'll be getting an engine hoist and stand because once I get a 5.0 Mustang I'll be pulling that engine for mods. The 302 is much easier to work on though :)

The jackshaft bearings are pressed into the block in the same way the OHV camshaft bearings are. A machine shop is usually required to replace the jackshaft bearings. I wouldn't worry about them.

I was planning to buy a 2000 Mustang GT as my next project vehicle but then I drove a Cadillac CTS rental car and realized at my age (64) my knees have problems when getting out of anything that is low. My wife and I both agree that all of our future vehicles will be mid-size SUVs or crossovers.
 




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I just bought this truck a year and a half ago so I've never had to replace the engine belt. I went to disassemble the front of the engine and found I could not get the engine belt off. Some nitwit went and put the engine belt on improperly. It was routed wrong. The diagram for how to route the belt is on the truck in front of the radiator but apparently someone didn't look at it. The belt was so tight, even with the tensioner loaded I couldn't get the belt to move at all. I had to cut the belt off. The tensioner wasn't even tight, it was trying to bend or wobble from front to back as if the bolt wasn't very tight. It also doesn't snap back very quickly when you release pressure on it. I suspect someone didn't know what they were doing and installed the belt wrong and thus damaged the tensioner.

Thus far I have now removed the radiator, Valve covers, ALT assembly, power steering and A/C as an assembly, water pump and fan together as well.

The power steering/A/C assembly is just pulled back a little from the left head and is tied off. The water pump was a pain to get off because of how tight the space was with some of the bolts and my hands didn't fit too well. No matter, I got it off.

It look 3 hours just to get the Alt assembly, PS/A/C tied off, and water pump off. It is deffinately going to take a while to finish this job. :roll:

I have to rent the tool for removing the crank pully. I am not entirely sure on the best way to go about removing this. I am hoping to figure out the easiest way. I am not looking forward to this part.

Btw, I have to get the crank sensor off the crank when I go to pull it, is there anything I need to know about this sensor for putting it back on? Such as, does it need to be in the exact same spot just like the chains need to be put back on the same tooth they came off.

Parts and tool is on the way. Once it arrives I'll use it to lock the left cam from moving. Once I get the HB off I'll pop the cover and see what kind of mess I got and I'll start digging out all that plastic and cleaning out the oil pump. Hopefully this is all done so once the parts arrive I can get the new guide and tensioners in place and start the reassembly process.
 




2000StreetRod

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removing serpentine belt & balancer

I just bought this truck a year and a half ago so I've never had to replace the engine belt. I went to disassemble the front of the engine and found I could not get the engine belt off. Some nitwit went and put the engine belt on improperly. It was routed wrong. The diagram for how to route the belt is on the truck in front of the radiator but apparently someone didn't look at it. The belt was so tight, even with the tensioner loaded I couldn't get the belt to move at all. I had to cut the belt off. The tensioner wasn't even tight, it was trying to bend or wobble from front to back as if the bolt wasn't very tight. It also doesn't snap back very quickly when you release pressure on it. I suspect someone didn't know what they were doing and installed the belt wrong and thus damaged the tensioner.

Too bad about the belt. I can't imagine how it could have been routed incorrectly. 12 Serpentine belt removal

Thus far I have now removed the radiator, Valve covers, ALT assembly, power steering and A/C as an assembly, water pump and fan together as well.

It was not necessary to remove the water pump. The water pump and front timing cover can be removed as one assembly.

The power steering/A/C assembly is just pulled back a little from the left head and is tied off. The water pump was a pain to get off because of how tight the space was with some of the bolts and my hands didn't fit too well. No matter, I got it off.

It look 3 hours just to get the Alt assembly, PS/A/C tied off, and water pump off. It is deffinately going to take a while to finish this job.

You've made excellent progress!

I have to rent the tool for removing the crank pully. I am not entirely sure on the best way to go about removing this. I am hoping to figure out the easiest way. I am not looking forward to this part.

I just finished posting a description of using the balancer puller. See post #4 of SOHC V6 Timing Chain Inspection & Repair

How do you plan to loosen the balancer bolt?

Unless the front crankshaft seal is leaking there is no need to replace it. However, be careful not to damage it when removing the timing cover.

Parts and tool is on the way. Once it arrives I'll use it to lock the left cam from moving. Once I get the HB off I'll pop the cover and see what kind of mess I got and I'll start digging out all that plastic and cleaning out the oil pump. Hopefully this is all done so once the parts arrive I can get the new guide and tensioners in place and start the reassembly process.

Is the "tool" you're referring to the OTC-6488 kit?

Are the "parts":
balancer bolt
timing cover gasket
primary tensioner
primary guide
left cassette
left hydraulic tensioner
lower oil pan gasket

If the upper and lower intake manifold gaskets have never been replaced I suggest you order the 00m12 kit. It costs less than just the left hydraulic tensioner but includes the left hydraulic tensioner and gaskets.
 




steadyhand

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Too bad about the belt. I can't imagine how it could have been routed incorrectly. 12 Serpentine belt removal



It was not necessary to remove the water pump. The water pump and front timing cover can be removed as one assembly.



You've made excellent progress!



I just finished posting a description of using the balancer puller. See post #4 of SOHC V6 Timing Chain Inspection & Repair

How do you plan to loosen the balancer bolt?

Unless the front crankshaft seal is leaking there is no need to replace it. However, be careful not to damage it when removing the timing cover.



Is the "tool" you're referring to the OTC-6488 kit?

Are the "parts":
balancer bolt
timing cover gasket
primary tensioner
primary guide
left cassette
left hydraulic tensioner
lower oil pan gasket

If the upper and lower intake manifold gaskets have never been replaced I suggest you order the 00m12 kit. It costs less than just the left hydraulic tensioner but includes the left hydraulic tensioner and gaskets.

How do I avoid damaging the crankshaft seal? How do I properly pull the timing cover to avoid this from happening?

Also, does that crank sensor need to be put back on with the crank in the same position as when it was taken off? Technically it would be I guess because the crank shouldn't move, but if it does, what effect will this have?

Also, I haven't figured out yet how I am going to loosen the balancer bolt. I am trying to find a good strap/chain wrench but so far no luck. I can buy a chain wrench online but it's like $50 and I'll have to wait for that.
 




2000StreetRod

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crankshaft seal

I'll have to get back to you later about the crankshaft seal. I'm just getting ready to work in the yard for a couple hours. We had a storm the night before last and some tree limbs came down.

There's no need to remove the crankshaft position sensor. Just leave it on the front timing cover but be careful when laying down the cover.

I couldn't find a suitable strap wrench locally at any price. I've thought about making my own tool with a bar and narrow chain but haven't tried it and don't know if it will work. An 18 inch pipe wrench may have deep enough jaws and is inexpensive but I don't really like the idea of using it. There's no way I would purchase the special Ford tool.
 








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I still haven't found a suitable strap wrench to take off the HB. Since I will be locking the left cam and not removing the jackshaft bolt, will it matter if it is at TDC? If not, could I used an impact wrench to remove the HB bolt or would it strip the bolt or threads in the crank? My impact wrench is rather cheap, but it has up to 250lb of torque so I would think that would be enough to break it loose.

What is the proper torque for the left front tensioner?
 




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impact wrench

Most members use an impact wrench to loosen the balancer bolt. Since it applies an impulse, usually the crankshaft rotates very little. When the bolt is loose the balancer will still be in place with the TDC marks. You can rotate the engine back into position using the left camshaft sprocket retaining bolt.

My Haynes manual states the torque for the left hydraulic tensioner is 35 to 39 ft-lbs. My primary timing kit assembly instructions state the torque as 49 ft-lbs if reusing the original washer or 32 ft-lbs if using a new washer. The washer can easily slip out of position before it is tight and then there will be a bad oil leak. Apply some grease to the washer before placing it on the tensioner to keep it in place.
 




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Well I I bought a large 18" chain wrench. This thing is without a doubt sturdy and will allow great leverage. It cost me about $50 but I'll need it later when I go to rebuild a 302. I also got the HB puller, but the problem is I can't find the m8 1.25x100mm bolts to fit the HB. I have checked the hardware stores and automotive stores and no one has any. I tried to find a threaded rod in the same size and so far no luck on that either. This is a slow process because a lot of the things needed can't be found very easily. Wish I had looked for it all before starting :)
 


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2000StreetRod

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chain wrench

I found a chain wrench online at Northern Tool Supply for $65 but couldn't tell if it was suitable. Where did you purchase yours? Let me know if it works.

You can use the stud bolts from your A/C compressor to pull the balancer. They are long enough and the correct thread. Just be careful that you don't break them by tightening the puller center bolt too much. Use the hammer and tap the center puller bolt head to jar the balancer loose. Tighten, tap, tighten, tap, etc.
 




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