• Register Today It's free! This box and some ads will disappear once registered!

Replaced radiator now no heat!


New2fixing

Member
Joined
July 20, 2018
Messages
53
Reaction score
5
City, State
Detroit, MI
Year, Model & Trim Level
2001 Explorer Sport Trac
Hey everybody! So I have a 2001 Ford Explorer Sport Trac 4X4. Replaced a cracked radiator. Filled up the new one and let it run for about 12 mins. No leaks but I noticed the heat isn't working. The temp gauge had it running right in the middle but I didn't check the hoses from the heater core or radiator to see if they get hot yet. I also put in a new thermostat about 4 months ago.

Any suggestions? Thanks! It's freezing here in Michigan so I really gotta figure this out! Haha
 




koda2000

Explorer Addict
Joined
September 2, 2011
Messages
13,843
Reaction score
1,442
Year, Model & Trim Level
x
You probably have an air pocket in the cooling system. Get the front of the truck on ramps or jack stands and run the engine with the radiator cap off to try to "burp" the air out. Don't drive it the way it is or you can overheat the engine and blow a head gasket or worse.
 




ptf18

Elite Explorer
Joined
June 5, 2012
Messages
313
Reaction score
23
Year, Model & Trim Level
2002 Sport Trac
Having "air pockets" in the coolant system has always been a concern of mine when working on the cooling system. Wonder how Ford "did it" when these vehicles were rolling off the production line?
 




koda2000

Explorer Addict
Joined
September 2, 2011
Messages
13,843
Reaction score
1,442
Year, Model & Trim Level
x
Having "air pockets" in the coolant system has always been a concern of mine when working on the cooling system. Wonder how Ford "did it" when these vehicles were rolling off the production line?

IDK, but would it have killed Ford to add a bleeder valve to the SOHC cooling system? Almost EVERY time I've had to mess with a SOHC cooling system I've had to fight trapped air. I only recall once where I didn't. My new-to-me 2009 Fusion 3.0L V6 has a bleeder valve right in the middle of one of the rad/heater hoses. Probably cost Ford $.02 per vehicle to add it. I've never had a problem with trapped air on any of my 5.0L's.

There are little tricks you can do to avoid the issue (ie place an aspirin in the t-stat to hold it open, warming the engine up with the truck's nose high and leaving the rad cap off, drill a small hole in the t-stat's plate). It's still a PITA. When I put my ST's engine back together (I will be installing a metal t-stat housing) maybe I'll add a small bleeder plug to the top of the t-stat housing.

It seems to me that Ford (and other manufactures) just loves to do things in such a way as to hasten the demise of your vehicle and to make them nearly impossible for DIY'ers to work on them. Things like...

- No bleeder valves in their cooling systems
- No drain plugs on trans pans (I add them)
- No cooling system block drains
- No dipsticks on their auto transmissions
- So called "life-time" lubricants/fluids
- So called "permanent fuel filters" inside of their fuel tanks (my Fusion)
 




Top