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Night Shade: Adventure trailer build thread.

Discussion in 'RV / Trailers / Camping' started by gmanpaint, May 15, 2018.

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  1. gmanpaint

    gmanpaint It's Always Something! Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    After everything was hit with the orbital sander and 120g, it all got two coats of sealer.

    Clearcoats 1.jpg
    Clearcoats 2.jpg

    This Baltic Birch 10 ply is some tough hardwood, and looks like it was quarter sawn the way the grain looks. That grain just came to life after this treatment was applied. Love it!
     
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  3. gmanpaint

    gmanpaint It's Always Something! Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    A couple top coats of gloss Spar urethane was applied, and left to cure for a few days. The front face boards cut/drilled, sanded, stained & clear coated. Once the faces were installed, I could get some measures. I loved the natural wood look, and even with all them coats on it, I still wanted more surface protection on areas that will get wet, or food on it.

    I found some countertop laminate and cut to size the old fashioned way. With a straight edge & a razor knife. Clamped the laminate and the straight edge to the table, and pre-made all my sections. Made the edges that needed trimmed a bit longer. Picked up a laminate edge router at the local big box store, and decent roller bearing trim bit. Got it set up, and on standby....

    Since this isn't your normal countertop job, certain care was needed for the sticky adhesive. Just like painting, the areas that needed kept clean, was masked off.

    Laminate tape job 1.jpg
    Laminate tape job 2.jpg

    Using a roller nap, I spread out the contact adhesive to both the laminate, and the surface it was going on. I only did one item at a time. Once dry (about 20-30 mins, small wood trim sticks was laid on the surface, and the laminate over them. Once positioned, and working from the center out, one stick at a time was removed, and a laminate roller (with plenty of pressure was applied), until all sticks was removed. If I can do this, so can you!

    Contact adhesive applications.jpg



    After all the laminate was installed, it was left to cure for a day. Then the router was plugged in, and a thousand screaming banshee's with razor sharp teeth was unleashed. As the bit spun at 30k rpm's, I let it do the work, and just guided the bit around the edges needing trimmed. Dang thing even has an Led headlight on it.

    The sink top. Drilled a hole into the sink opening, that allowed the router bit to drop in and do it's thing.

    Sink laminate install and router hole.jpg
    Sink cutout.jpg

    Cleaned up the edges with a 220g sanding sponge, and test fit the collapsible sink. Perfect fit!

    20190704_133215.jpg

    The trim edge you see around the laminate is a 3/4" thick lid support/stop. Those was fun to make without a table saw. ( no table saws was used or harmed in any of this build).

    The sink lid is a multi purpose item. The top of it was laminated for counter space work area. The backside when open will have what you see in the pic below, and as soon as the big brown box truck shows up, the paper towel holder, and the swingout camp light hanger arms will be installed.

    20190704_133043.jpg

    I had to make my own brackets for the gas lift. The ones made for it are too tall to fit in the 1" gap with the lid closed. I used 3/4" angle iron. The gas lift is rated for 24 lbs.The ball studs are SS. Yes, you see a sink strainer. it also collapses like the sink to 1" thick.

    20190704_133118.jpg

    The lid closed, and the nice work top. Had to keep the hinges small for clearance reasons. These hinges are 1" and rated for 4 lbs each. The top is 3/4" thick.

    Sink top counter.jpg

    The grill box...

    I decided to do the walls around it to keep it clean. Over time, this area could get nasty and the wood might discolor, or get blemished. The drawer front was a tough call for how high I could go. Keeping it even with the back wall, wouldn't work because the latch hole wass right in the middle of it, and the latch wouldn't fasten evenly. so it was all the way up or not at all. I chose all the way up. Only did the middle of it, and it kinda looks goofy, but hey, it still helps.

    Grill laminate install.jpg

    After trimming it up, I added a length of 1/2" angle iron with holes drilled out for stainless hooks. Have to hang the cooking utensils somewhere when cooking!! Bonus as it will also protect food bits from falling onto the roller bearing slide below. I then added a couple of SS eyebolt's, and used some SS drawer pulls for the grill straps. The stove has rubber feet that lift it 1" high, the rear pulls are at 1/2" above the surface.

    Stove straps.jpg

    Wasn't going to show this until later with the gadget post, but here you can see the brand new 65k BTU 3 burner Stansport Stove being held down with the straps. Once strapped, it will not budge in any direction. I had to get the stove before I started this build. The entire thing was based off this stoves measures. It's a frigging beast. Has a high altitude regulator, and a turn style ignition. Spring loaded locking latches. 1/4" cooking grates. Two 25k burners on the sides, and one 15k middle burner. It's 26" wide, and can accommodate two 10" cast iron skillets, a large flat top, or a 12" skillet, and large stock pot, with room to spare.

    stove strapped down.jpg


    Drawer box...

    To add a small countertop for the single burner stove, I chose this crazy method. Using a Bamboo utensil box, I added 100 lb 14" slides to it, made a 1/4" Birch lid, and laminated it. Underside was clear coated a few times. Super sturdy...and level! lol

    Drawer loose.jpg
    drawer box slid back.jpg

    For the lid, I used two magnet latches used on glass entertainment doors. Have to push down firmly to get them to open up, to raise the lid. SS hinge on the backside. Fun part was having to use 5/8" screws on 1/4" materials, and grind them all flush after install. I used some washers to help reduce the pass thru on them, so only 1/8" points needed removed.

    drawer box opened.jpg

    Alright, that's all for today, but still more to come soon. Ask away with any questions, as I left out a lot. I could have wrote a book just on this kitchen build.
     
    Last edited: July 5, 2019
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  4. gmanpaint

    gmanpaint It's Always Something! Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    Maxed out the picture allotment on the last post. Was like last call at the watering hole...... "Don't have to go home, but you can't stay here"!

    Missing picture from the last post, showing the grill opened. You can see the 1/2" angle below the knobs used for hooks to hang cooking utensils. The slides make a 3/4" gap, so 1/2" works perfectly.

    Stansport opened.jpg

    Anywho..... More Chooching happened today. Got the latches installed.

    Slam latches used in Marine applications was the choice for the left side slide outs. Figuring these out was a PITA. Normally they are installed in doors, that are inset flush. You just measure the thickness of the door, and place the catch that same distance back on the top or bottom of the cabinet. Then measure from that surface up the door face 1.5", and drill a 2" hole. This application was opposite, and then some. Had to do a ton of measuring over & over & over. Then did some practice cuts with different measures. I made a few 2" holes in a board to find which depth worked best for each latch. Yes, each had a different measure due to the location of where the latches met the drawer face.

    Slam latch practice board.jpg

    I'm slow to begin with, and I took my time with this.... 10 hours later, I had two 2" holes cut and a 3/8" deep mortise router cut done.

    For the main box, I used a HD stage gear box handle. Spring loaded, and recessed into the drawer face by 3/8". 1" SS R2 screws used to install it into the 3/4" face, and the 1/2" box wall behind it. Very strong handle, and ease of operation resulted. Very happy with it.

    Put it together today and had to do a little tweaking of the latch catches for smooth operation. Holes are slotted, so they can go back & forth a little adjustment. I actually had to grind off about 1/16" of one of them. Was a bit too tight for my liking (shush....don't go there).

    Bench test before the actual install in the trailer.

    Finished 1.jpg
    Finished 2.jpg
    Finished 3.jpg
    Finished 4.jpg
    Finished 5.jpg
    Finished 6.jpg

    Got the last set of big slides started for this to be installed tomorrow. From there, I can begin making the large top for it, that will also be used for upper storage. I can't wait to get all this done, and the shop cleaned up. It's a ginormous mess right now, and hardly any room to walk around with 3 tables in use, while working around the trailer itself. On the home stretch at least. :)


    Remember kids, stay out of strip clubs, if you can't tip.
     
  5. gmanpaint

    gmanpaint It's Always Something! Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    The missing lid latch showed finally, so I installed it this morning.

    Sink lid latch installed.jpg backside of lid latch.jpg lid latch catch.jpg
     
  6. gmanpaint

    gmanpaint It's Always Something! Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    Got busy on my Sunday off. Spent the entire day working on this thing. I only quit because the heat got to me, and my left arm was going numb. Cold shower helped.

    Any Vey......

    Built and installed the main wall mounts. 3/4" Birch, 2 seal coats. Only had to move them once, which was once too many. 3/8" off in width :facepalm:

    Made a small access door for the water filter, and installed the slides.

    main box wall mounts.jpg
    water filter access door open.jpg

    Since me, myself, & I had a hard time maneuvering this bulky cabinet, I enlisted the help of my trans jack and some lumber. Have to get the slides on one at a time, and reposition myself to do both. This helped big time. It was fully extended and still 6" short.

    trans jack helper.jpg

    After installing the main box, I realized I didn't allow for the fold down table on the back of the trailer door. Back out it came, and move the sliders back 2.5". That sucked. Have to drill 1/4" holes perfectly for the T-Nuts. Ok, main box back in again.

    Pushing it all the way back, the locking slide, wouldn't lock. I forgot that that slide needs to stick out 1/4" further than the other side. Back out the main box came. Re-did that slider again. Glad there was multiple holes to choose from in the slides!! 1/4" isn't much at all, but the holes are 3" apart, so it worked out. Back in goes the main box, and there goes my frigging back. Seriously, it popped in like 5 places, then shot a bolt of lightning down my leg. Break time.....

    10 mins later, the box is in, and the rest of them installed as well. Every single part on this entire build, can be replaced if damaged. There is no glue used in the build, and with the pocket hole construction, just make a new piece, and replace it.

    box installed 1.jpg
    box installed 2.jpg

    8 hours later, I closed up shop, and made Brunch. I forgot to eat today. :crazy:

    Next step is the lid for it. :sawzall:

    Hope you all enjoyed the holiday :usa:. Well, not you :uk:
     
    Last edited: July 11, 2019
  7. gmanpaint

    gmanpaint It's Always Something! Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    Deck lid is done.

    47.5" Wide x 46" deep.

    3/4" Baltic Birch. Made two sections to be able to install it. Once laid out, both sections are fastened together with pocket hole screws.

    Supported on three sides. Fastening these to the walls was done from underneath with six 4" angle brackets. Additional brackets made from 1.5" angle iron, was bolted to the trailer frame side tubes, and the deck sits on top of them. The back of it sits on top of the 24" water tank bracket angle.

    Cut, sanded, sealed twice, test fit, and then the deck material was installed using 3/4" alum angle trim, with stainless screws and those little screw ring dealio's @Turdle suggested a while back. Rolled up the loose material, and installed this section in the trailer. I made a wood jig that kept the side vertical walls square, evenly spaced, and straight as I fastened the lid to the walls brackets. The end result is a super strong deck surface to load up & secure with camp gear.

    lid 1.jpg
    lid 2.jpg
    lid 3.jpg
    Lid 4.jpg

    Fit the second section, then joined them together with the special pocket hole screws.

    lid 5.jpg

    Unrolled the rest of the decking material, and while holding it taught, installed the edge trim to hold it in place. The last piece installed was the E-Track.

    lid 6.jpg

    Need a couple more of those HD cinch straps for securing anything loaded on this deck. Which will consist of camp chairs, camp tables, camp cots, shower tent, and the likes.

    Still have to clean up the front vertical wall edges. I have some matching color poly shade urethane for the exposed bare sides. Didn't plan on these showing or extended like this, but since I forgot about the drop down table needing the 2" space, I had to inset the entire box back, exposing these edges. Was too late, and I didn't want (feel) like cutting them down. lol Oh well, it is what it is.
     
  8. gmanpaint

    gmanpaint It's Always Something! Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    Ruh Roh......

    I stepped back and looked at the trailer sides from the front. I just noticed the tires have a massive amount of negative camber. I put the level on the tires, and measured 3/4" gap between the level and tire after making the level bubble, well.... level. This measure was just a few inches above the wheel, not the top of the tire. :(

    The axles came with some camber shims, but for the life of me I can't find them. They are only 1/6" thick if I remember correctly, and only gave 4 per axle, meaning I can only stack two at a time. I don't think 1/8" of adjustment will be enough to take this amount of it out.

    The frame does not flex. These axles are supported at the back with 3"x3"x1/4" angle iron to the frame for a gusset. Then there is the 1/4" thick sq tube that crosses the frame, and ties them into each other, by inserting into the sq hole made in the axles.

    I called Timbren in Canada, and talked to the tech rep. He said he wanted to see pictures, and show them to the engineers, before advising anything. I sent them a bit ago, just waiting on the reply.

    My fear is I will have to do what I was talking about months ago here, and removing these units for the heavier 5200 lb units, with beefier spindles. That means new hubs and new brakes, as these are 10", and the 5200's are 12". Not to mention I have to either change wheels to a 6 lug, or add 2" adapters for these 5 lugs. Ugh!!!!!

    Negative bubble

    Negative camber shown with level.jpg

    Gap with bubble level above the wheel center

    camber gap.jpg
     
  9. Turdle

    Turdle This is my custom user title Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    Man.
    I think I speak for everyone when I just stand here with a jaw drop look on my face wondering where to begin. Geez man. This is one nice build.

    Glad the trim - upholstery washers worked. They look good there

    edit
    got a straight on rear view shot to see the camber?
     
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  10. gmanpaint

    gmanpaint It's Always Something! Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    Thanks for the positive comment Jon. Mucho appreciated!! I finally found a use for them washer ma bob things. lol

    I have to take the trailer out of the shop, to get a good view and pic of the tires from the rear. That's not an easy task. Have to air down to about 5 lb's to clear the overhead by 1/32nd, and hook it up to the rig. I plan on taking it out this weekend to test the water system, so I will do it then, and post up.

    Edit:
    This is what caught my eye and the tire camber. I have been rolling the trailer back n forth to work on the rear compartment. All the wood cutting I have been doing left saw dust, and the tires picked it up. You can see plain as day, the outer edge of the tires aren't even touching the ground.

    tire track dirt.jpg
     
    Last edited: July 11, 2019
  11. gmanpaint

    gmanpaint It's Always Something! Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    Well fudge. First big mistake made, and it's a whopper. I said it in the first post that this could and probably will happen, but damn... :(

    I decided to check the hubs, to make sure they was torqued right, and there wasn't any slop causing the negative camber. As I lifted the rear of the trailer I watched the tires. As soon as the trailer was high enough to lift the tires, they straightened right out. Put the level to em, and perfect. I still redid the hubs just in case. Lowered the trailer and watched the tires as the weight was put back on them. They splayed right back out, and the negative camber is back.

    So these axles are 3500 lb units with a big ole urethane type bushings on the swivel bolt. My belief is, they just can't handle the weight of this trailer.

    Backing up (yes, here we go again) to the beginning of this build, I bought the axles at the same time the frame was being built. These model's was chose for the lug pattern to match the tow rig (5 on 4.5) and the biggest units available for those. At the time, I thought these would be plenty for this build.

    The next step up in axles are the 3500HD. These are actually 5200 lb units, but they call them the 3500HD, with HD standing for Heavy Duty, and for off road tires. I still shrugged at that, and still believed the regular 3500 units would work, and I could keep the matching set of wheels, offering me two spare tires, just in case. Yeah, I screwed up. I need the bigger axles. Story of my life right there.

    So here is my plan (so far, but can change).... Buy the 3500HD units, and get a set of 2" wheel adapters, and pray the tires still fit under the fenders. The 3500HD arms are different in measures. They don't match up width or length wise to the frame orientation. I can correct the front to back by moving them on the frame, but can't do jack all about the width. If the spacers don't work, then diff wheels will be needed, and the widths can be corrected with offset, to allow them to tuck under the fenders.

    Because of the costs associated with these larger units, hubs and brakes, (possibly new wheels too), this will take me some time to save up for them. I will sell the current zero mile axles for a loss, to help re-coop the costs. What really pisses me off is new, there is only a $100 difference in them. Sigh......

    Edit:
    After a little digging thru the axle specs, and comparing the HD units to what I have, it looks like I have no choice but to get a 6 lug wheel. The HD spindles stick out 2" further than these, and can't add adapter spacers, because the tires wont fit under the fenders with them. So I will have 3 new MT wheels for sale along with the 3500 lb Timbrens. Only good news on this, is that MT makes these same wheels in the 15" size with the Toyota 6 on 5.5 pattern, and I can keep these new tires. wooosaaaa
     
    Last edited: July 12, 2019
  12. BKennedy

    BKennedy Elite Loser Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    How many degrees are the out at the top? I think you should tow it around on a few trips and see if it effects tire wear.
     
  13. gmanpaint

    gmanpaint It's Always Something! Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    Tires are too expensive to even gamble like that. Plus, if I damaged these new axles somehow, I won't be able to sell them.

    The tires are splayed out with the trailer dry, and there is still a few things to add to it. It's only going to get worse. I didn't put the angle finder on it, but can to get an actual measure, but for now, I'm just going to say it is about that much, too much.

    I was assured from Timbren that these axles are only supposed to articulate up/down only. I needed to know this when ordering them, to figure the tire to frame gap. To know the gap I had to buy the tires and wheels first, and measure the actual backspace with tire on. lol

    Here is what I currently have. This diagram shows the 6" gap from frame to hub face. I have a 5" hub to tire wall backspace. 1" was too close to the frame, so I added 1" spacer (5 on 4.5 to 5 on 4.5) to get a good 2" gap.

    ASR3500S05_kk_500.jpg

    This is the 3500HD unit showing the 8" gap from hub face to frame.


    ASR35HDS02Dimensions2_2.jpg

    Going to have a 3" gap from tire to frame now, without the spacer. That moves the tire out another inch, and very close to the fenders outside edge.
     
    Last edited: July 19, 2019
  14. Turdle

    Turdle This is my custom user title Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    I have to ask a stupid question now.
    Is it possible the trailer frame rails are twisting under weight?
     
  15. gmanpaint

    gmanpaint It's Always Something! Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    Nope. The frame doesn't flex at all. I measured across the rails with the trailer on the ground, and when tires where lifted. Same measure.

    Here you can see the cross member close to the axle unit. These are 3/16" thick, and there is plenty of them on this frame.

    Frame and axles 2.jpg

    The green arrow is pointing at the 1/4"x2"x2" cross member that ties these 2 axles together, and is supposed to stop them from flexing. This is why I believe the pivot bushing is giving way under load.

    Inkedcross beam for axles installed_LI.jpg

    Large pivot bushing

    Pivot bushing.jpg

    I just put the angle finder on the tires using a straight edge, and at the top of the tires, it is off 5*.

    I thought of one idea to try in the meantime. I used a 1/4" x 3" x 3" angle to gusset the backsides of these units to the frame rails as suggested. Arrow pointing to the angle gusset in the pic below. It might be flexing. I am going to weld on 3 triangle gussets to it, and see if that is causing it. I looked at some more pictures from Timbren, and noticed they did this to their gussets. Free to me to do it, so yeah.....

    Timbren angle gusset.jpg

    I still think these need replaced, but it will be sometime before this happens, so doesn't hurt to to do the added gussets, and add some camber shims to see what happens.
     
    Last edited: July 13, 2019
  16. BKennedy

    BKennedy Elite Loser Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    Can you shim the mount so its aligned straight?
     
  17. gmanpaint

    gmanpaint It's Always Something! Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    That was the question I asked Timbren. They have shims for the spindle mounts to correct camber, but not sure the max adjustment. Hopefully they get back to me soon on this. 5* is a lot to correct with little thin shims. Not to mention it will get larger the more weight I add.

    I called the Timbren dealer I purchased these from, and they don't accept returns past 60 days. I knew it was a gamble, but had to ask. lol Had them work up a price for the HD set with the 12" hubs and brakes. $1k total, but hey.... free shipping! Wooooo!!

    I should be able to sell the current set for about 2/3 the original costs easily. The 5 lug 15x10 wheels on the other hand... who will only want 3 wheels? ack.
     
  18. gmanpaint

    gmanpaint It's Always Something! Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    Took the day off of work. Was too hot to do the roof job scheduled. :angryfire:

    Spent an hour on the phone with Timbren today. They talked me into taking the spindles off, to check for a known defect on some of them. Apparently during production, the robotic welders was set to close, and caused some splatter, and one weld too big on the spindle plate. It might be causing the negative camber if the spindle plate, and the main arm plate aren't seated completely flush. Never know, and it might be worth the try.

    They also offered to send me different swivel bushings that are stiffer. Tech is checking with the engineers, to see if they can also have a different spring that is for a heavier unit. I'm willing to try all this if it saves me from buying the bigger units, three wheels, tire swap, and time to do the swap. Fingers crossed!!

    It was 110* real feel today. I spent 5 hours fabricating the table section of the fridge slide. Heavy long sleeve shirt, welding helmet, and thick gloves on. I think I might have melted a few brain circuits. Neighbors must think I'm nuts. lol Table came out pretty bad ass tho. :D

    More on the slide in a week or so, as I am waiting on parts once again.
     
  19. BKennedy

    BKennedy Elite Loser Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    San Diego, PRofK
    Year, Model & Trim Level:
    1994 XLT
    I think you are on the right track. Good deal the manufacture is trying to help you with their stuff. Unusual these days. I got overheated today working on the horse trailer. Its not that hot, but the sun is brutal. I got to a point then said "nope" and got out of the sun.
     
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  20. gmanpaint

    gmanpaint It's Always Something! Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    City, State:
    MO MO
    Year, Model & Trim Level:
    94 & 95 XLT's
    They are Canadian, they are a friendly company, and want to help. Definitely not used to that. Lol

    Weather turned brutal today. 97 and 80% humidity. Next few days are only going to be worse as the temps climb. We shut down all exterior jobs until next week.

    Thinking of taking this fridge slide in for a powder coat. If not too much, I think this item will benefit from it.
     
  21. gmanpaint

    gmanpaint It's Always Something! Staff Member Moderator Elite Explorer

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    94 & 95 XLT's
    Fridge slide table build:

    With the time off from this recent heat wave, I have been able to knock out the fridge slide build. 95% done with it.

    I shopped around for a fridge slide, and found they are pretty damn expensive. I believe there is a lot to them, but I also believe your paying for the name, and the niche. For example, the smallest Dometic slide starts at $250, and go to $400. ARB quality these days is crap, and they are even more.

    So after researching the size of fridge I want, I discovered I have to settle for something not as big, and not as much! lol A Dometic 65qt dual zone is well over $1k, and ARB 50's are even higher. Sad really. After figuring out all I really needed was a good power consumption rate, and a proven quality compressor, I went from there. I settled on a few choices to decide later, but all of them are about the same size. I built the slide to fit the largest of those units.

    So far I'm into this for $120 in materials and hardware. I did use some materials I already owned, and not including those. My time is free, but if I was charging at a decent rate, lets just say $25/hr, and have 3 days with about 15 hours into it, that price would be pretty high to build it for someone else. Good thing I don't charge myself! lol This unit is stronger than the pre-built units, and custom made to fit exactly how I need it.

    Alright, enough of the boring chit chat bullchit.

    Slide is made up of two steel sections, Table and base. 16" wide x 30" long x 2.5" tall. The pre-made fridge slides are made with the base being the widest, and the table is set on the inside. To me, that is a waste of real estate, and I built this the opposite, with the base inside the table top. The base is hidden, and out of sight until it is opened up. Even then, you really won't see it because the fridge blocks the view.

    Started with the top table section. After getting the width measure at the bottom of the trailer door opening, I made the top 1/4" narrower. The side of the door opening at the bottom is angled to follow the fender, and gets wider as it rises. So I just had to clear the very bottom of the opening.

    Cut the table top to size using 14 ga steel sheet. Set up the chop saw, and cut the four sides of angle, with 45* miters. I made a couple spacers for the width, and clamped all the angle together evenly onto the table top, and welded them together. Main side runners are 2" angle. I used smaller angle for the front & back for a reason. The front angle is 1.5", and the rear is 1". Front will be used for the locking pin bolt, and the rear is used as a slide stop on the base section. These needed to be smaller than the main runners in order to clear the base unit cross sections. Welded on 4 corner strap loops for the fridge. These fridges are strapped down using the handles. Will use HD cinch straps made for fridge tie downs. I had a center tube support under the table, but had to remove it, as it interfered with the locking design I came up with.

    slide top view.jpg
    rear angle stop gap.jpg

    Lower base section. The Heavy duty 250 lb slides are 3/4" thick. Set the table section upside down, placed 3/4" blocks against the side runners, set the base's runners into place, and got my width measure. More cutting, more clamping, and more welding. I cut two cross pcs of strut, and two cross pcs of 3/4" tube. Clamped and welded them in place. Strut is used for ease of bolting to the trailer.

    welding bottom cross braces.jpg

    Setting slides has never been easy for me, and these proved to be a bit more difficult. I had to offset the heights a little on each section, for the math to work out mounting this into the trailer. Table top was offset by 1/8" and base was offset by 1/4" to get the 3/8" lift I was after. Used 1/8" shims under the slides, then clamped and drilled the bolt holes. Once assembled, I was able to test fit it into the trailer.

    Setting bottom slides for install.jpg
    slide bottom view partially open 1.jpg
    slide fully open table test.jpg

    The doors lower lip is 1" higher than the interior flooring. I have to space block under this slide to raise it 3/4". With the 3/8" lift I got from mounting the slides the way I did, it gives me the clearance I needed for this to open/close, w/o hitting the door lip and it's weather stripping.

    slide profile.jpg

    slide test fit 1.jpg
    slide test fit 2.jpg

    The cheaper lower rated slides have cheap plastic stops. These slides have nice rubber stops on them. They also slide smooth as silk, and do not bend, sway, or hang up in any way. Ryadon brand slides if anybody is interested. These are 2" tall HD 250 lb versions. They have 3" tall 500 lb slides, with or without locks as well.

    slider rubber bumps.jpg

    Latch showed up. It's better than I expected. Serious beef. Serious enough that it will double as the pull handle. The handle and spring is part of the 1/2" bolt, and it screws into the thread barrel, all in one piece. I can replace this bolt if ever needed, and can change the size of the tip extension, plus change to a tapered tip if wanted. It works out perfectly for powder coat.

    Slide latch in hand.jpg
    Bolt removed.jpg

    Since I will use it for the handle as well, I decided to beef it up with a bottom plate, and a face plate as shown below. You can't tell ( I pretty much added 20 lbs of weld to this lol), but there is a 1/4" sq plate under it, and up the side. 1/8" plate was added to connect it to the frame itself below.

    Slide latch 2.jpg
    Slide latch 1.jpg

    Slides and handle are coming back off, and it has been sent off to the shop, for sand blasting & powder coat. 1-2 weeks turnaround. It weighed in right at 40 lbs.

    That's all for now kiddo's. Enjoy the heatwave!
     
    Last edited: July 23, 2019

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