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My A4LD Rebuild Diary - Part 3 - Reassembly

Glacier991

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[This is part 3 of a 4 part series on rebuilding the A4LD automatic transmission. Part 1 is here: http://www.explorerforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=98027
and Part 2 is here:
http://www.explorerforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=101571
Each can be read stand alone, but yu will get more out of this if you start at the beginning.]

PART THREE - REASSEMBLY

Well, it is all apart, so this thread will be devoted to the "put it all back together". To strart I will devote my attention to the valve body. I still have one mod left to install, but I put the entire thing back together and will install that later. So the start off installment is

VALVE BODY REASSEMBLY

As I was doing this I realized that the actions are the same, just repeated over and over for each bore in the valve body. I will not "bore" you that much, just show you a few things, a couple of mods and call it done.

MODS

I put the Superior Valve body Kit and the Transgo kit both in. I intend to add the Sonnax Boost Valve upgrade too. I also added the Sonnax manual valve index.... Let's start with that, since it's pretty visual. The manual valve is what the shifter hooks to - when you select D, R or OD you are moving this lever. Over time the hole gets elongated. This can, in extreme cases even lead to burned front clutch plates according to Sonnax. Here is the new MOD (left) next to the old valve (right), you can SEE the elongation in the old manual valve hole.
15286Dscn4380.jpg


The mod goes over the shaft... now the hole is round and correctly sized.
15286Dscn4381.jpg


The main benefit of this is that it limits the outward travel of the valve. Apparently the elongated hole allowed it to come out too far opening up a pathway to energize the forward clutch in park, causing burned plates. It hits the case so it cannot come out too far:

15286Dscn4398.jpg


Seemed like a worthy mod to me. $20. Wonder how many front clutch plate burnouts might be blamed on something else?

Most of the other mods involves different springs in various bores, drilling holes in the valve body or separator plate (covered elsewhere) and a few other modifications elsewhere in the trannie (which we will cover as we go). Nothing more really visual for here.

Let's walk through a couple of bore replacements. Starting with the TCC solenoid bore.

Each bore has a combination of valves and spring(s) in it - capped usually by some kind of plug held in place by one of about 4 types of "keepers" Here is what goes into the TCC bore..

15286Dscn4382.jpg


There are the spring and the valve, a bore plug, designed for this type of L shaped keeper... these L babies have a way of wanting to leave, so keep an eye on them in your reassembly. In this bore, the solenoid actually only shares the bore, it does not actuate this valve directly, as there is a plug between it and the plug. The TCC solenoid is held in place with a bar keeper, AND a valve body screw. One MOD gives you a washer to use under the screw. The bar keeper also helps act as the keeper for the next door neighbor bore. (pics in a min)

Meanwhile the usual drill is to lubricate the bore and the valve, and carefully insert the valve and springs into the bore.. by hand.... feeling as you go...
15286Dscn4383.jpg


Once it gets too far in to use my fingers I find a pencil eraser gives me good feel and is not likely to score anything....later I started wrapping the metal band on the pencil with electrical tape, just to be SURE.
15286Dscn4384.jpg


I'll insert the valve as far as I can. Use common sense and LOOK. sometimes you are short of the final destination, and i just needs some patient wiggling to go in farther. Often I will retain it by using a toothpick or something, so it stays put (remember that SPRING) while I insert the plug. Plugs can easily get cocked in the bore, do not force them... it's patience time. Once they are in the right spot, drop in the keeper - here the L pin, and voila!
I am pointing out the L pin here with the dull pencil...

15286Dscn4385.jpg


Then add the solenoid.... the keeper really needs to await the companion bore to become occupied, but here it is for the camera...

15286Dscn4387.jpg


These solenoid bar keepers do not fit tightly, and one trick is to bend them a little to snug the solenoid to the valve body. On THIS solenoid there IS the screw to hold it so it is less important - the 3/4 Solenoid has no screw and relies on the keeper for a snug fit. THAT one we will bend a little... Note the space here though...

15286Dscn4389.jpg


Here's the next door bore.... (we all have one of those, right?) note the long plug.
15286Dscn4390.jpg


Every bore is quite different.. reason enough to bag them one at a time as you take this apart to keep everything straight! As you go the MOD kits will tell you to substitute springs by color in appropriate cases, otherwise it is pretty rote - same same. Patience, lubricant and a gentle touch will do it. In this bore the "keeper" is the bar.... at the end of the long plug... which you can see in the bore...

15286Dscn4391.jpg


The next bore is the 3/4 solenoid... the one that has the screen that gets plugged so easily. I put in a replacement without a a screen. On this one I bent the keeper:
15286Dscn4392.jpg


and so it holds the solenoid snug

15286Dscn43931.jpg


If you plan to reuse the 3/4 solenoid (which is perfectly ok by me), clean the screen well. It is a VERY fine screen and apparently plugs easily. [Note: I use brake cleaner for a lot of things. When it goes on sale for a buck a can I buy a case (or 2).] Here the tube snoot on a can of brake cleaner works great to blow out the plugged screen holes, backwards...compare this pic to the tear down pic..

15286Dscn4394.jpg


Another type of keeper is the round "plug nickel" washer type....there are a few of those too, here is one being installed - drop it in - the separator plate holds most all of this in place, with gravity assisting.
15286Dscn4395.jpg


finished appearance
15286Dscn4396.jpg


Well I continued like this around the valve body until I had finished. I put in the check balls and the hockey pucks, and I was done. Here it is completely finished, save for the gasket and the separator plate. Those will await the Sonnax Boost Valve Mod and then I will put it ALL back together here.
15286Dscn4397.jpg


Let's end this post by talking briefly about some thoughts on valves and bores. Most of the valves are aluminum... I polished one or two lightly with scotchbrite pads and worked them in the bores with lubricants to make them move easier. I made sure each valve moved easily in it's bore. In some cases this meant a little work and exercising it with lubricant until it moved freely. I think polishing a valve is ok, if you are judicious, and try not to round any sharp edge on the valve spool. Also never put anything metal or sharp in the bore. Usually you can work a valve out of the bore from on top of the valve body looking down into the bore - inch it along with a tiny screwdriver or popsicle stick until it's far enough out to get hold of. For plugs I found forceps to make good pliers, and then polished the plug for reuse. I am less concerned about plugs and polishing them more aggressively than actual valves. Anyway, others may have their own experiences, but I think this is good advice.

[Late Edit] A few folks have had trouble finding diagrams as to where the check balls, accumulator pucks and relief valves go... so here is the 2 pages from the FORD manual. The first page shows the locations. Note that there are 8 possible checkball locatons A through H. The 2nd image is the chart showing what ones get a check ball depending on the engine size and year. The 4.0 (which lost of us have) takes 4 balls... at locations A, D, F and G. Anyway at the suggestion of one forum rebuilder that I post them in here - here they are:

15286DSCN5655-med.JPG


and here's the chart

15286DSCN5654-med.JPG


Also since I wrote this Tn_Explorer did a photo thread on his Valve Body Rebuild, and I am linking to it here for you to see. EXcellent job and lots of good info there:

http://www.explorerforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=126461

I have had several requests, and recently built a VB for someone, so I did a photo thread, in detail, like TN_Explorer. Here is a link to that one as well:

http://www.explorerforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=137972

Hope all this helps.

Next up, OD Drum. And a discussion on spring compressors and some reassembly tools

Copyright 2004

(the last was added on a suggesion someone emailed me. I am happy to share this magnum opus, that is what this site is all about, but I want it to benefit this site and its users, and not find a booklet published elsewhere on the web - hence this notice [end legal disclaimer])
 



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Opera House

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I found some spools very difficult to get out. In fact, I think the last rebuilder went poking in there with something sharp to get them out. Had to polish some plugs in order to get them back in. I found a thin wall rubber hose connected to a shop vac very usefull in removing the spools.

I have seen a number of posts that seem to identify low pressure problems with a sticking pressure regulator valve. A seperate post identifying this bore, the parts kit number, and the steps to fix this would be useful.
 






zippee

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Chris, where are you buying your parts?
 






Glacier991

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Most of my parts are from Aceomatic (now ATC Group) (has a local store). Some from PDQ transmission here in town, and some from FORD. A couple direct from Sonnax.
I'll update the parts list in part 1 when I am done with part numbers, suppliers and costs.

Opera House - that's the final valve body mod I was referring to - the "Boost Valve - Pressure Regulator", different names for the same thing. The bore for mine is in good shape, so I am not going to ream it oversize (the tool alone costs $110) I will be replacing the stock setup wih the Sonnax part. The part number for the 4.0 is 56947-02K.It includes a seeve, a valve and 2O-rings.... here it is

15286Dscn4623-med.jpg


The interior of the sleeve is pretty polished, and the exterioruses O-rings for a positive seal.... here is the interior

15286Dscn4624-med.jpg


The valve inside is anodized to help reduce wear.. purple - how sweet.

15286Dscn4626-med.jpg


The sleeve comes with 2 O-rings (concept!)..... they go in the lands as shown here

15286Dscn4627-med.jpg


here they are installed:

15286Dscn4628-med.jpg


This simply goes into the valve body in place of the old one.. tof inish, here they are side by side....old vs new. I lubed te new one, and then put the new one where the old one was - was all there was to it.

15286Dscn4665-med.jpg
 






Glacier991

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OVERDRIVE

Just like whatever it is that separates the men from the boys, it's the Overdrive that separates the Explorer from the Pinto. Pinto had a 3 speed C-3. Explorer has a 4 speed C-3, oops a C-3 with OD called the A4LD.

The OD is a known problem area, and one we will try and pay special attention to. [I do not have all my pics tonight, so this post will evolve, but I wanted to start it tonight.]

An important part of the OD setup is the front one way (O.W. or sprag) clutch. I wondered what a sprag was, and looked it up in Websters. A Sprag is: "A pointed stake or steel bar let down from a halted vehicle (such as a wagon) to prevent it from rolling". Ok makes SOME sense.

In a transmission a sprag consits of MANY (26 in the A4LD OD O.W. clutch to be exact) little steel fingers that kind of face in one direction, the direction of rotation, and allow rotation THAT direction. Reverse it and they GRAB and hold. The wagon stops.

Let me try and show you. Here is a NEW OD sprag in FORD installation tool (a silly unnecessary tool in MY humble opinion, came with others I got along the way) can you see how these little steel fingers tend to point in one direction?

15286Dscn4403.jpg


Opposite direction to the permitted rotation is grabbed and held. The "thing" grabbed is a part of the OD planetary. This large round part on the planetary goes into the sprag

15286Dscn4497.jpg


This planetary used to fail BIG time... now it is a super beefy welded thing... like this:

15286Dscn4496.jpg


here's a closeup of the welded portion

15286Dscn4499.jpg


Since the OD clutch and planetary are about the number one (or at least high on the list) of A4LD failure points by history, I am replacing both. Cost ? about $80.

The Sprag coming out looked more or less ok, with some minor wear marks. Here is the clutch inside the OD output ring gear housing, the wear marks kind of appear under the flash...

15286Dscn4405.jpg



The OD drum I replaced because my confidence in it was lacking.... see the teardown portion (Thread #2) near the end. WHY the wear on the pump end was eccecentric we can debate, I just know that for $30 for a new drum I eliminated ONE possibility.

The OD sprag is housed in the OD output shaft/ring gear assembly (see last pic). This unit connects through the center case support to the forward clutch drum. The tip of it goes into a needle bearing in the end of the output shaft -THAT is it's sole support. Here is the nearly "pencil" size of the tip now being supported in that manner:
15286Dscn4409.jpg


and here it is inserted:
15286Dscn4502.jpg


Not a real confidence builder.
A MAJOR upgrade will be to let the center support, by adding a steel bushing to size, support a much larger diameter portion of that shaft, shown here
15286Dscn4410.jpg


This part is currently unsupported, but will be once we add the sleeve. Sonnax ssuggests you cut off the tip of the OD shaft to prevent possible "binding" due to the shaft being supported at two points. Why not use both points of support? Remember, Sonnax "suggests" you do this. I worry about the lack of front piloting of the output shaft in this situation. Since this EX is not going offroad and is more or less a road car.. I think I am going to leave it. I think if I was going to be offroading or using a higher HP application, I'd follow their advice.

Lots more to show and say about the OD portion, but let me end this for now by showing why snap rings and retaining rings should always be suspect... I took apart the OD ring gear - by removing a retaining ring. I put it back and it no longer fit well at all. Look:
15286Dscn4408.jpg


Think of the marks you see on the retaining snap ring as being like like tan lines... and the outer shell as the swimming suit. OBVIOUSLY the lines have moved inward. The retaining inside snap ring does NOT fit anymore. BEWARE!
 






Glacier991

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OVERDRIVE DRUM AND CLUTCH REASSEMBLY

I decided to replace this as discussed in the teardown. $30 got me a shiny new drum

15286Dscn4507.jpg


The large seal protector used elsewhere (High/Reverse) also works here, so I put it on....

15286Dscn4508.jpg


then using vaseline lubricated both sides of the piston sealing area... center first
15286Dscn4509.jpg


then outer...

15286Dscn4510.jpg


Thn I lubricated the seals and installed them on the piston, lips towards the bottom (non-spring side). I started with the inner, carefully working it into the groove..
15286Dscn4503.jpg


and then smoothed and lubed it in place
15286Dscn4504.jpg


then did the same with the outer ring...
15286Dscn4505.jpg


Here is showing the lip flair aimed downward
15286Dscn4506.jpg


Next I place the lubricated piston with seals installed in the drum, over the center seal protector...

15286Dscn4511.jpg


and applying even pressure press it to the bottom of the bore...it was not difficult to do
15286Dscn4512.jpg


with the protector removed, here is the assembled piston in the drum - ready for springs

15286Dscn4513.jpg


and here are the springs installed 3, space, 3, space etc until all 15 are in
15286Dscn4514.jpg


FORD is now using a new style retainer. The new one is on the left, old on the right. The new style compleely surounds the snap ring to prevent it from disengaging. If it did, the results were catastrophic! The new style Ford part number is E5TZ-7A527-A (actually 7A527-A ought to do it - and the dash A is the kicker!)

15286Dscn4515.jpg


Here it is on the springs

15286Dscn4516.jpg


Because it completely surrounds the snap ring, it has to be compressed completely below the ring groove area

15286Dscn4517.jpg


This may be a good place to discuss snap ring pliers. Usually when you say snap ring pliers, we think of rings with holes in them. While those DO exist in auto transmissions, most do not have holes for the pliers to insert into. You need a snap ring plier with flat surfaces to expand these rings. Here is a plier and a ring...

15286Dscn4518.jpg


Squeeze the pliers and expand the ring
15286Dscn4519.jpg


Oddly enough, these are not all that easy to find. Mine are made by Proto.

Ok install the snap ring

15286Dscn4520.jpg


and then release the compressor. Compare and see how the new retainer surrounds the ring
15286Dscn4521.jpg


another view

15286Dscn4522.jpg


Now it is time for steels and frictons. 3 to be exact. We are going to use spiral grooved ones from the 5R. As always start with steel...

15286Dscn4523.jpg


then add a soaked friction - in our case with the word "TOP" up and showing...
15286Dscn4525.jpg


Then another steel, another friction, another steel, the last friction and then the thick "pressure" plate

15286Dscn4526.jpg


Add the snap retainer and you are back together. I gauged mine, and found it (a I did in every instance in this transmisson's clutches) near the outer limits. I will be using the next thicker retaining ring (up to .082 from.068) to bring the spacing into the middle range of the specifications. [The reverse and OD clutches share the same retaining rings and so se the same FORD numbers. The Forward clutch is different.]
 






Glacier991

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FORWARD DRUM/CLUTCH ASSEMBLY

This is a pretty straight forward reassembly. We have a clutch piston with 2 seals, 6 friction and 6 steels, and some springs and a retainer. The Forward clutch IS a little odd in that it has a "cushion" made of rubber. Makes exact gapping tough, but also there was a running change in size that some may miss. Let's start with installing the piston... I will assume you lubed the seals before installing them... yes you got it - CHEAP man's TransGel ...

15286Dscn4419.jpg


This one has 2 seals.... one big and one small..

15286Dscn4415.jpg


So we go to the rebuild kit to get the replacements...

15286Dscn4416.jpg


Like I said earlier, it is like a grab bag.... but fortunately these sizes are distinct, and soon you can ferret out 2 matching rings...
15286Dscn4418.jpg


Lubricate them and install them in the piston... easy enough... Now the piston in the drum.... FORD makes two installers for this, and while I cannot say they are "MUST HAVES" I would say they are really wonderful to have. One goes over the inner snout... first apply vaseline on the entire area..
15286Dscn4420.jpg


Then place the seal protector over the end
15286Dscn4421.jpg


(This is part of the old FORD C-3 Tool set, referred to earlier)

Next lubricate the outer sealing area in the drum

15286Dscn4422.jpg


The outer seal protector is a deep ring that slips into the drum, and compresses the seal as it heads down...
15286Dscn4423.jpg


Here they are both installed
15286Dscn4424.jpg


I lubed the seal protectors too, and slide the piston down into place... it was NOT a piece of cake, but went ok. The piston has a circular ring of rubber... a cushion... between it and the clutch plates.
15286Dscn4429.jpg


Pre 90 it was thicker, and post 90 thinner. Most good rebuild kits offer both. Use the thinner one. Here are the two in my kit in my caliper... Thick one (old)
15286Dscn4425.jpg


Newer one (thinner)

15286Dscn4426.jpg


Now time for the springs again. Simply drop them on the posts
15286Dscn4430.jpg


until they are all in place...

15286Dscn4431.jpg


then add the retainer plate
15286Dscn4432.jpg


Compress it, and add the snap ring retainer (was a PITA - but I won). Here is my Rube Goldberg Spring compressor set up here

15286Dscn4434.jpg


Now it's time for the frictions (hew spiral gooved ones here) and steels. I had a question about the requirement to soak replcements in ATF for a minimum of 30 mins... I'd heard two reasons... one was becase they swelled and you needed to know proper final measurements for ring clearance meaurement. The second said because hey will glaze on initial starup dry otherwise. Well I decied to check what I could, so I checked to see if they swelled.

Here the plate is before going into the bath
15286Dscn4428.jpg


And here is coming out an hour later.verdict ? See for yourself, no swelling. So must be for glazing protection.

15286Dscn4433.jpg


So we start by adding a "steel" on top of the cushion
15286Dscn4435.jpg


Then the first friction... and since this is the new style... make sure the side marked "TOP" is UP...
15286Dscn4438.jpg


Then another steel

15286Dscn4439.jpg


We continue the alternation (making sure the "top" is up on each and every friction plate) until the last friction is in... then we add the thick steel pressure plate
15286Dscn4440.jpg


Then the snapring and time to meaure clearance... the frictions and steels are NOT under pressure, slide a thickness guage under the snap ring and pressure plate... Remember that rubber "cushion"? You might be able to gauge within + or - .002, but this is a ROUGH measurement.... the range is .055 to .083. Me I came in around .080. Some would say that's ok. I'd prefer to be around .060. - .065, for a more aggressive BITE of full engagement. Hmmm how do I do that? Selective snap rings. FORD makes 4 for this clutch. Thinnest to thickest... .054, .068, .081 and .096. What do I have? I mic'ed it.. and found

15286Dscn4442.jpg


Ok not an exact match, but probably the .068 one.... so if I want my .080 gap to be more like .060 - .065, the the next thicker snap ring of .081 is .015 bigger than my .066. 15 Thou off my approx .080 is .065! Bingo. The FOD number is E86017-S. Done. Here's the thicker one in the calipers.. it moved a little, it was dead bang .081

15286Dscn4640-med.jpg
 






zippee

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I guess those springs might be called clutch springs. If I recall a prior picture correctly, there was a total of four springs missing/four posts unsprung in a previous picture.
 






Glacier991

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Zippee - in the OD clutch, there are 3 springs, an empty post, 3 more, etc - a total of 5 sets of 3 springs. (I think the pictures are at the end of page two, part 2) In the Forward clutch and in the High/Reverse clutch there is a full complement of springs. I think you are remembering (correctly) the OD clutch disassembly.
 






zippee

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Okay!!!
 






Opera House

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Manual valve mod

Had a chance today to look at the manual valve of an A4LD and play with the Z linkage. You can get considerable rotational play just from the Z bracket that amounts to about 0.12 in and out movement. While the sleeve adaptor limits the maximum extended travel in park, it doesn't help this play any. I noticed that the Z in some cases didn't extend through the hole on the other end of the valve. It could potentially hang up and not make it through the smaller hole of the mod. Another washer where it mounts on the shift bracket would help that. A better fix would have been to have thicker metal or a small welded post on the pan side to restrain this twisting movement. Though, not sure if it really matters. What you should edit into the procedure is the maximum depth from the end of the bore (pan side of 206) to the end of the valve spool so people can check wear, etc. Also for those who might want to make one, the distance from the center of the hole to the end of sleeve that hits the valve body.
 






Glacier991

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Excellent point Opera House. The Sonnax info says that your maximum insertion into the bore from this end should not exceed .450.

15286Dscn4492.jpg


With the valve travel limiter resting against the case...

15286Dscn4495.jpg


Gauge the depth of the spool... remember under .450

15286Dscn4493.jpg


And I get....

15286Dscn4494.jpg


[Edit note : Either I misrecollected, or Sonnax changed their instrutions, this is the latest, and I think best info]


For those wanting to maybe make their own (Oh to have a lathe!)

From the end that contacts the valve body casing to the closest end of the hole measured .875. Though it's a poor way to gauge a smallish hole, the hole calipers out at .152. HTH.

ps. I pulled out my drills and a #24 is .152 - perfect fit. Inteestingly, the "original" factory hole is reputed to be .157. Maybe the "slop" OperaHouse refers to may be as a result of the hole size becoming enlarged?

In addition Sonnax adds: "S (or Z as we have been calling it) link wear at the "Rooster Comb" is very common. If the S link is worn significantly, it should be replaced with a new OEM part (D4ZZ-7E333-A)"
 






Glacier991

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HIGH/REVERSE REBUILD

Well having seen the process with the forward clutch, this s going to seem more or less deja vu. To begin with we lubricate the seals... these are lip seals and the lips aim to the bottom

15286Dscn4475.jpg


With both seals installed, use vaseline to lubricate the center sealing area and the outer sealing area

15286Dscn4477.jpg


FORD makes a seal protector to ease installation for this drum too. Candidly I found the design of this drum to be more "seal friendly" and think the tool was unnecessary... but I had it so I used it. You put it over the center...
15286Dscn4478.jpg


and then push the piston down over it. This one easily went in and bottomed out...

15286Dscn4480.jpg


This one gets springs from the Superior Kit... colorful...


15286Dscn4482.jpg


One at a time add a spring to each post

15286Dscn4483.jpg


until they are all full

15286Dscn4484.jpg


Then top that with the retainer
15286Dscn4485.jpg


Add the clutch spring compressor

15286Dscn4486.jpg


another view

15286Dscn4487.jpg


Compress the retainer, add the snap ring and remove the sompressor... on to steels and frictions. Start with a steel...

15286Dscn4488.jpg


Alternate steel and friction making sure the "TOP" printing shows on the spiral plate friction if you are using them...
15286Dscn4489.jpg


end with the presure plate, add the snap ring and you are back together. Next measure the gap between the top of the pressure plate and the retaining ring. I was .070,which is within spec (.051 - .070) on the high side. My snap ring was .067... so I plan to go to the next thicker one which is .081 (Ford Part E860128-S), so my final clearance should be .056, within spec, and a little "tighter".
 






Glacier991

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CASE MODIFICATIONS

You may recall we machined the case to sleeve the governor bore with a steel sleeve, and also removed the rear sprag race to install a new rear washer and new rear race. We'll do those in this post.

The governor bore was already machined before. So all we need to do is to install the new sleeve. Use locktite... a wise precaution..



Place the driver in the sleeve and place it in the bore, and then press it into place...



Here it is installed.



Now I'll drill the oil holes. There are 2 main ones in the sides, and one at the bottom, very small, for it I just notched the shell - so I have 2 to drill. Here is the drill coming through on the first one:



and here it is on the 2nd one:



Next I'll deburr these with a little 320 carbide paper...



And here is our new steel sleeved governor bore:



That was case upgrade 1. Now for case upgrade 2, the MAJOR one in my book. A new rear case washer and rear sprag race.

...to start we are going to place the drilling jig back into the governor bore - to serve as a strong support for what we are about to do - THIS IS IMPORTANT - case damage can result otherwise



Then with that still in place we invert the case on a steel support in the press - the case is now resting on the jig


Next the washer - notice the cutout and the tang...


This is a poor pic, but here it is installed... before the race goes in on top of it...


it is important that the tang not interfere with the washer sitting flat (mine didn't). Next add locktite to the race snout....(this is the only way to do it - with your finger)


The new race, notice the cut out side, this goes DOWN


I had a rube goldberg set up.. a short 4x4 on top of the race, the round bushing driverhead I used just to take up space - in use it was all centered. This was a bear, and to be honest I never did get it to bottom - REALLY close, maybe .030, and I think I am going to call it good.
[Edit. As I thought about this, I said to myself "NO cutting corners" on a "bulletproof rebuild". My press just cannot do it so I dropped the case off at my local friendly auto machine shop and they will finish pressing the race ALL the way down for me.]


That is it for this case. There are other "fixes" but this case does not need them. I'll add the output shaft busshing and then it's ready for guts to go back in. (I'll talk about lightly burnishing the servo bores later as we get there).
 






Glacier991

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Sorry for the hiatus on this project. I was out of town, and the auto machine shop was reluctant to put the kind of pressure on the case end that the rear race probably needed. We made a deal, they could set it up and I'd come pump it - if it broke something would be my fault that way. I looked carefully at the diagram of that end of the case,and with the drill jig tool in the governor bore, everything was well supported, so off I went. My press is only 12 ton, and it wasn't up to the job, theirs was 25 ton and while the gauge on their telling the tonnage applied was broken so we didn't know exactly at what pressure the race went down, I'm guessing 15 ton or so. So it's where it belongs, and now I am waiting for some ordered parts to arrive to put this puppy back together. Stay tuned.
 






Glacier991

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Ok.... finally.. PARTS. And time. Hey I solved one mystery, and might save you all $25. The bellhousing bolts... FORD says DO NOT REUSE. I was curious... why not ? They are not highly torqued. I canalways add locktite if that is the issue. AnywayI popped $25 for a new set and DUH.... it's the o ring seals. Look

15286Dscn4595-med.jpg


You can buy replacement O-rings for a couple bucks... I do not know what the blue coating is, but I'll blue locktite them when I reuse old ones, to be safe. We'll get this thread going again!

another pic of an installed ) ring.

15286Dscn4596-med.jpg
 






Con Seann3ry

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i've never rebuilt a transmission and I probably never will...but this is really interesting and one of the best write ups i've ever seen, thanks glacier
 






zippee

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We're following every word...
 






metalhed

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I can't believe I haven't seen this thread until now. I've spent the past 4 or 5 hours reading and researching, and this series has really shed some light on an otherwise daunting subject. Before reading this, I was worried I may not even be able to change my filter without messing something up. Armed with this knowledge, I feel like I can tackle even a partial DIY rebuild with confidence.

Still plan to release a video of some sort for this? (video/guide on cd for computer use.) Something that more concisely detailed the operation. A parts list with numbers(cross-referenced), tools needed, steps taken, outside resources, total costs, etc. All this included, I don't see how you couldn't make a killing by compiling it and releasing it for public consumption.

Honestly, this series of threads could very well become a DIY bible for a complete teardown and rebuild of this transmission (to me anyway).

Thank you. Keep it up.
 



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Glacier991

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Thank you all for the kind words.

Now starting from the back.... let's look at the governor, a potential problem child (which our rear case washer fixes should eliminate) Those with 4R44 and 4R55 and higher, do not have one, but us A4LD folks do. You can elect to replace it (not a bad choice, but about $50 to 60 bucks.... IF you buy from Torrie at Ford Parts Network (more on this wonderful source later)... or you can elect to "rebuild it". The main parts are 4. A stand and race, a valve, and a counterweight and a spring....the upgrade kit adds a spring behind to help prevent sticking... it's small, but apparently does it's job. Here is the exploded view, including the add on spring :

15286DSCN4560_1_1.JPG


I will assume you have polished the land on the stand with scotchbrite...now lube it with vaseline...

15286DSCN4561_1_1.JPG


add the springs and assemble it....

15286DSCN4562_1_1.JPG


Set it aside, for installation. (damn this is starting to sound like a cooking show)... the hot transmission fluid will melt the lube... we will use lots of Vaseline during the assembly.
 






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